Post List

  • December 14, 2016
  • 03:07 AM
  • 235 views

Urinary metabolomics in autism turns up tryptophan (again)

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"The tryptophan metabolic pathway collectively displays the largest perturbations in ASD [autism spectrum disorder]."So said the findings reported by Federica Gevi and colleagues [1] (open-access) who provide yet more 'metabolomic' data when it comes to autism to add to the already quite voluminous peer-reviewed matter on this topic (see here for example).Just in case you aren't analytical chemistry-saavy, metabolomics is basically the study of the various chemical fingerprints that th........ Read more »

  • December 13, 2016
  • 12:00 PM
  • 51 views

Study points to new chronic form of liver disease associated with ingestion of Brachiaria grasses

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective | Press Releases

Researchers at the Federal University of Santa Maria in Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul State, of Federal University of Mato Grosso do Sul, in Mato Grosso do Sul state, and the University of Cuiabá, in Mato Grosso state, in Brazil, analyzed cattle livers in a abattoir and found a new form of chronic liver disease probably associated with ingestion of Brachiaria grasses. … Read More →... Read more »

Faccin, T., Kommers, G., Galiza, G., Pupin, R., Madureira, R., & Lemos, R. (2016) Chronic liver disease in cattle associated with ingestion of Brachiaria spp. Ciência Rural, 46(11), 2036-2042. DOI: 10.1590/0103-8478cr20160297  

  • December 13, 2016
  • 08:23 AM
  • 244 views

Acceleration of electrons in the solar wind by Langmuir waves produced by a decay cascade by Catherine Krafft and Alexander Volokitin

by CESRA in Solar Radio Science

It was recently reported that a significant part of the Langmuir waveforms observed by the STEREO satellite (Graham and Cairns, 2013) during type III solar radio bursts are likely consistent with the occurrence of electrostatic decay instabilities, when a Langmuir wave \(\mathcal{L}\) resonantly interacts with another Langmuir wave \(\mathcal{L}^{\prime}\) and [...]... Read more »

  • December 13, 2016
  • 04:30 AM
  • 216 views

Can Using a Whole Body Vibration Warm-up Give Athletes Quicker Feet?

by Stuart McCrory in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Whole-body vibration improves performance on quick feet test when compared to a traditional warm-up.... Read more »

Donahue RB, Vingren JL, Duplanty AA, Levitt DE, Luk HY, & Kraemer WJ. (2016) Acute Effect of Whole-Body Vibration Warm-up on Footspeed Quickness. Journal of strength and conditioning research, 30(8), 2286-91. PMID: 27328378  

  • December 13, 2016
  • 04:25 AM
  • 257 views

'My child is not talking'. Online concerns and internet-based screening for autism?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"Online communities are used as platforms by parents to verify developmental and health concerns related to their child."That was the starting point for the study results reported by Ben-Sasson & Yom-Tov [1] (open-access available here) who approached an increasingly important issue related to how the Internet and social media in particular, is fast becoming one of the 'go-to' options when it comes to parental concerns about their child's development and the question: could it be autism........ Read more »

  • December 12, 2016
  • 03:16 PM
  • 244 views

Bacteria Help Pitcher Plants Trap Prey

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish



Pity the insect that tumbles into a pitcher plant's trap. The slippery walls and waiting pool of water ensure it won't clamber back out. There's nothing left to do but wait to be digested.

The California pitcher plant (Darlingtonia californica) is also called the cobra lily for its curled-over shape that hides its exit from its victims. Unlike other pitcher plants, it doesn't fill its trap from above with rainwater but from below, drawing water up with its roots. But like others, it seems... Read more »

  • December 12, 2016
  • 10:43 AM
  • 223 views

Simple Jury Persuasion: Why you don’t want your  trial videos to elicit awe from jurors 

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

While you don’t want jurors to think your visual evidence was made by poorly trained technicians—here’s a study that tells us something counter-intuitive that you may find useful (we have). It may not make obvious sense, but you also don’t want jurors to be blown away (i.e., awed, in wonder, overwhelmed by the majesty of […]

Related posts:
Simple Jury Persuasion: Educating jurors about science may have no effect
Simple Jury Persuasion: Telling jurors where to look
Simple Jury Pe........ Read more »

Farias M, Newheiser AK, Kahane G, & de Toledo Z. (2013) Scientific faith: Belief in science increases in the face of stress and existential anxiety. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 49(6), 1210-1213. PMID: 24187384  

  • December 12, 2016
  • 04:37 AM
  • 241 views

Maternal immune activation (MIA) and Old World monkeys

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Old World monkeys detailed in the title of this post, specifically refers to a type of animal called a rhesus macaque who were the 'participants' of choice as detailed in a recent study by Destanie Rose and colleagues [1] looking at a concept called maternal immune activation (MIA).Those who followed this blog down the years will no doubt have seen me discuss MIA before in the context of autism and/or schizophrenia (see here for example). The basic theory is that whilst in-utero a........ Read more »

  • December 12, 2016
  • 04:30 AM
  • 208 views

Substance Use by Gender and Race Among Teenage Athletes

by Jessica Pope in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

While general substance use patterns are seen in adolescent athletes, some gender and racial/ethnic groups are at more risk than others. Prevention and educational programs should be designed with this in mind.... Read more »

Parent, M., Bradstreet, T., Piper, M., Brace, T., & Parkman, T. (2016) Racial Disparities in Substance Use by Sport Participation Among High School Students. Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, 77(6), 980-985. DOI: 10.15288/jsad.2016.77.980  

  • December 11, 2016
  • 02:07 PM
  • 221 views

MS2 mRNA imaging in yeast: more evidence for artefacts

by Gal Haimovich in Green Fluorescent Blog

Previously, on the story of MS2 in yeast: Last year, Roy Parker published a short article, in which he claimed that using the MS2 system in yeast causes the accumulation of 3′ RNA fragments, probably due to inhibition of mRNA … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • December 10, 2016
  • 04:48 PM
  • 204 views

Yet again, more of the same …

by Craig Payne in Running Research Junkie

Yet again, more of the same …... Read more »

  • December 10, 2016
  • 04:28 AM
  • 295 views

"Are we expecting too much from the extreme male brain theory of autism?"

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The title of this post reflects the commentary published by Andrew Whitehouse [1] (open-access) discussing the meaning of the findings reported by Kung and colleagues [2] who quite categorically stated that there was: "No relationship between prenatal androgen exposure and autistic traits" in their study.OK, androgen exposure and psychology basically refers to the extreme male brain theory and autism which suggests that the so-called over-representation of autism in males is potentiall........ Read more »

  • December 9, 2016
  • 07:18 PM
  • 263 views

The Most Interesting Stellar System Of All?

by Jeffrey Daniels in United Academics

Researchers at the Carnegie Institution of Washington re-examined the Kepler data and determined that it had also been steadily dimming over the course of those four years, on top of its sporadic dips in brightness. For 1,000 days, the rate of dimming observed was constant; then, for 200 days after, its dimming rate suddenly increased by some order of magnitude; finally, for the remaining 200 days, its brightness had remained largely unchanged.... Read more »

Boyajian, T., LaCourse, D., Rappaport, S., & et al. (2016) Planet Hunters IX. KIC 8462852 – where's the flux?. Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 457(4), 3988-4004. DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stw218  

Montet, B., & Simon, J. (2016) KIC 8462852 FADED THROUGHOUT THE MISSION . The Astrophysical Journal, 830(2). DOI: 10.3847/2041-8205/830/2/L39  

  • December 9, 2016
  • 10:02 AM
  • 65 views

Research presents favorable results of psychological intervention with women victims of intimate partner violence

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective | Press Releases

One of the factors for violence perpetuation is the transmission of coercitive practices through family generations. The Parceria Project (Projeto Parceria) aims at teaching parenting skills to Brazilian women victims of intimate partner violence and shows that it is possible to intervene in order to contribute to the development of healthier family relationships. … Read More →... Read more »

  • December 9, 2016
  • 04:53 AM
  • 258 views

'Big data' Taiwan and schizophrenia risk

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Today I bring the findings reported by Chou and colleagues [1] (open-access available here) to the blogging table and how the research might of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Database (NHIRD) brought it's 'big data' ("n = 23 422 955") to bear on the question: what is the risk of developing schizophrenia where one or more first-degree or other relatives are affected?The answer: "Having an affected co-twin, first-degree relative, second-degree relative, or spouse was associate........ Read more »

  • December 9, 2016
  • 04:30 AM
  • 229 views

Balancing on the BACK

by Abbis Haider Jaffri in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Patients who suffer from current or previous symptoms of lower back pain demonstrated lower reach distances in the posterior directions of the Y-Balance Test compared to healthy individuals.... Read more »

  • December 8, 2016
  • 05:12 PM
  • 294 views

Do We All Have Split Brains?

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

When you're doing two things at once - like listening to the radio while driving - your brain organizes itself into two, functionally independent networks, almost as if you temporarily have two brains. That's according to a fascinating new study from University of Wisconsin-Madison neuroscientists Shuntaro Sasai and colleagues. It's called Functional split brain in a driving/listening paradigm



In referring to 'split brains' in their title, Sasai et al. are linking their work to the litera... Read more »

Sasai, S., Boly, M., Mensen, A., & Tononi, G. (2016) Functional split brain in a driving/listening paradigm. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 201613200. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1613200113  

  • December 8, 2016
  • 03:14 PM
  • 103 views

ExAC presents a catalogue of human protein-coding genetic variation

by Kamil S. Jaron in genome ecology evolution etc

Exploration of variability of human genomes represents a key step in the holy grail of human genetics – to link genotypes with phenotypes, it also provides insights to human evolution and history. For this purpose Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC) have … Continue reading →... Read more »

Lek M, Karczewski KJ, Minikel EV, Samocha KE, Banks E, Fennell T, O'Donnell-Luria AH, Ware JS, Hill AJ, Cummings BB.... (2016) Analysis of protein-coding genetic variation in 60,706 humans. Nature, 536(7616), 285-91. PMID: 27535533  

  • December 8, 2016
  • 10:56 AM
  • 287 views

The Reconstruction of Ships: Sailing the Seas of International Collaboration

by Filipe Castro in United Academics

Working for both public and private institutions, archaeologists constantly construct and deconstruct narratives about our past, but traditionally publish only a fraction of the sites they excavate and thus destroy. Computers and the internet present a vast range of opportunities for archaeologists to share primary data and foster intercultural online collaborations and reinterpretations of archaeological contexts. ... Read more »

Bass, G. (1961) The Cape Gelidonya Wreck: Preliminary Report. American Journal of Archaeology, 65(3), 267. DOI: 10.2307/501687  

  • December 8, 2016
  • 09:14 AM
  • 227 views

What are Hierarchical Orthologous Groups (HOGs)?

by Christophe Dessimoz in Open Reading Frame


One central concept in the OMA project and other
work we do to infer relationships between genes is that of Hierarchical
Orthologous Groups, or “HOGs” for the initiated.

We’ve written several papers on aspects pertaining to HOGs—how to infer
them,
how to evaluate them, they being
increasingly adopted by orthology
resources, etc.—but there is
still a great deal of confusion as to what HOGs are and why they matter.

Natasha Glover, talented postdoc in the lab,........ Read more »

Sonnhammer, E., Gabaldon, T., Sousa da Silva, A., Martin, M., Robinson-Rechavi, M., Boeckmann, B., Thomas, P., Dessimoz, C., & , . (2014) Big data and other challenges in the quest for orthologs. Bioinformatics, 30(21), 2993-2998. DOI: 10.1093/bioinformatics/btu492  

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