Post List

  • September 4, 2014
  • 02:20 PM
  • 94 views

Pop Culture Osteology: Once Upon a Time #2

by JB in Bone Broke

Intrepid. Swashbuckling. Fearless. All adjectives that describe my tenacious approach to dissertation data collection. Oh wait, no, I’m wrong again. These are all adjectives that describe the rapscallion Captain Hook and imperturbable Emma Swan on ABC’s fairy-tale soap opera Once Upon a Time.... Read more »

Dyke, G.J., R.L.Nudds and C.A.Walker. (2007) The Pliocene Phoebastria ('Diomedea') anglica: Lydekker's English fossil albatross. Ibis, 626-631. info:/

  • September 4, 2014
  • 01:34 PM
  • 105 views

Total Recall: How the Brain Processes Color and Motion

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Despite the barrage of visual information the brain receives almost constantly, it retains a remarkable ability to focus on important and relevant items. This fall, for example, NFL quarterbacks will be rewarded handsomely for how well they can focus their attention on color and motion – being able to quickly judge the jersey colors of teammates and opponents and where they’re headed is a valuable skill. How the brain accomplishes this feat, however, has been poorly understood.... Read more »

Guilhem Ibosemail, & David J. Freedman. (2014) Dynamic Integration of Task-Relevant Visual Features in Posterior Parietal Cortex. Neuron. info:/http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuron.2014.08.020

  • September 4, 2014
  • 01:00 PM
  • 81 views

Performing Funerals in Mycenaean Greece (1600-1100 BCE)

by Katy Meyers in Bones Don't Lie

I’ve been spending the last few days learning about grave goods found with the dead during the Early Anglo-Saxon period. Grave goods are an interesting artifact- as it isn’t something […]... Read more »

Boyd, Michael. (2014) The materiality of performance in Mycenaean funerary practices. World Archaeology. info:/

  • September 4, 2014
  • 11:41 AM
  • 30 views

Internet addresses are running out in Asia!

by Wiley Asia Blog in Wiley Asia Blog - Social Science

Internet addresses are "the numbers that uniquely identify computers and devices on the Internet". Although the current version of the Internet Protocol known as IPv4 provides 4.3 billion addresses, "they have already begun to run out". Computer experts created another Internet Protocol version in mid-1990s which is known as IPv6 that can provide "nearly infinite address space". The challenge, however, is that "IPv6 Internet is not backwards compatible with the........ Read more »

Liv Coleman. (2014) Next Generation Internet Policy in Japan, China and India . Asia . info:/

  • September 4, 2014
  • 09:42 AM
  • 36 views

Drop the strut: Both men and women find humility more attractive

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

By guest blogger Temma Ehrenfeld.There’s been much debate about the “cheerleader effect,” the idea that men are wired to attract desirable mates by showing off in silly ways. The effect may not even exist, but if it does, they might try humility instead. New research suggests that both men and women prefer humble to less humble partners.The studies are part of a push to define humility, a concept associated less with science than Christianity, as in Matthew 11:29 where Jesus says “I am........ Read more »

  • September 4, 2014
  • 06:59 AM
  • 90 views

Syringammina fragilissima: World's largest unicellular organism

by beredim in Strange Animals

Syringammina fragilissimaCredit:  Andy GoodayKingdom: RhizariaPhylum: ForaminiferaClass: XenophyophoreaOrder: PsamminidaFamily: SyringamminidaeGenus: SyringamminaSpecies: Syringammina fragilissimaCommon name: NoneHard to imagine that the sponge-like thing in the photo is actually comprised of just one cell, right? Meet Syringammina fragilissima, the world's largest unicellular organism, with a maximum diameter of at least 20 cm (~8 in)!Discovery & HistoryThe species was first descr........ Read more »

Laureillard, J., Méjanelle, L., & Sibuet, M. (2004) Use of lipids to study the trophic ecology of deep-sea xenophyophores. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 129-140. DOI: 10.3354/meps270129  

  • September 4, 2014
  • 04:51 AM
  • 83 views

Epigenetic processes and autism: focusing on immune function?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Although the title of this post talks about the science of epigenetics in autism, I'm actually going to be talking about two papers today, one of which also covers exposure to prenatal immune activation and what effect that might have on epigenetic processes in the mouse brain. This may also be relevant to at least some autism..."Beneath this mask there is an idea, Mr. Creedy. And ideas are bulletproof"First off we have the paper from Nardone and colleagues [1] (open-access) which, following som........ Read more »

Nardone, S., Sharan Sams, D., Reuveni, E., Getselter, D., Oron, O., Karpuj, M., & Elliott, E. (2014) DNA methylation analysis of the autistic brain reveals multiple dysregulated biological pathways. Translational Psychiatry, 4(9). DOI: 10.1038/tp.2014.70  

  • September 4, 2014
  • 04:48 AM
  • 85 views

Want people to care about the environment? Don't overplay the power of science

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

When people are presented with a picture of rapid scientific progress, they are less likely to engage in environmentally friendly behaviours. This is the conclusion reached across a series of experiments in which students were presented with a short newspaper article on science's achievements and future prospects.The news article came in two flavours. Participants in the "progress" condition read a uniformly positive perspective, lauding medical advances and new technologies to combat climate ch........ Read more »

  • September 3, 2014
  • 07:27 PM
  • 79 views

Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) and autophagy: anti - and proviral effects

by thelonevirologist in Virology Tidbits

Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) is small non-enveloped ssRNA with a genome of 7.8 kb and thus considerably smaller than CoV. Being the causative agent of myocarditis, encephalitis, reproductive disorders, diabetes, and neurological diseases, EMCV pathogenesis is viral strain and host specific. Although EMCV infection in humans are only associated with low morbidity, the use porcine xenografts may cause future problems. The expression of the EMCV 2C and 3D proteins has been shown to induce all ........ Read more »

Carocci, M., & Bakkali-Kassimi, L. (2012) The encephalomyocarditis virus. Virulence, 3(4), 351-367. DOI: 10.4161/viru.20573  

Maurel M, Chevet E, Tavernier J, & Gerlo S. (2014) Getting RIDD of RNA: IRE1 in cell fate regulation. Trends in biochemical sciences, 39(5), 245-54. PMID: 24657016  

Chakrabarti A, Ghosh PK, Banerjee S, Gaughan C, & Silverman RH. (2012) RNase L triggers autophagy in response to viral infections. Journal of virology, 86(20), 11311-21. PMID: 22875977  

Hamasaki M, Furuta N, Matsuda A, Nezu A, Yamamoto A, Fujita N, Oomori H, Noda T, Haraguchi T, Hiraoka Y.... (2013) Autophagosomes form at ER-mitochondria contact sites. Nature, 495(7441), 389-93. PMID: 23455425  

  • September 3, 2014
  • 07:27 PM
  • 73 views

Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) and autophagy: anti - and proviral effects

by thelonevirologist in Virology Tidbits

Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) is small non-enveloped ssRNA with a genome of 7.8 kb and thus considerably smaller than CoV. Being the causative agent of myocarditis, encephalitis, reproductive disorders, diabetes, and neurological diseases, EMCV pathogenesis is viral strain and host specific. Although EMCV infection in humans are only associated with low morbidity, the use porcine xenografts may cause future problems. The expression of the EMCV 2C and 3D proteins has been shown to induce all ........ Read more »

Carocci, M., & Bakkali-Kassimi, L. (2012) The encephalomyocarditis virus. Virulence, 3(4), 351-367. DOI: 10.4161/viru.20573  

Maurel M, Chevet E, Tavernier J, & Gerlo S. (2014) Getting RIDD of RNA: IRE1 in cell fate regulation. Trends in biochemical sciences, 39(5), 245-54. PMID: 24657016  

Chakrabarti A, Ghosh PK, Banerjee S, Gaughan C, & Silverman RH. (2012) RNase L triggers autophagy in response to viral infections. Journal of virology, 86(20), 11311-21. PMID: 22875977  

Hamasaki M, Furuta N, Matsuda A, Nezu A, Yamamoto A, Fujita N, Oomori H, Noda T, Haraguchi T, Hiraoka Y.... (2013) Autophagosomes form at ER-mitochondria contact sites. Nature, 495(7441), 389-93. PMID: 23455425  

  • September 3, 2014
  • 04:25 PM
  • 99 views

HIV and Dementia

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

With the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy (or cART) during the mid-90s, the life expectancy of HIV patients has significantly improved. An unfortunate side effect of this is that long-term complications are becoming more relevant: almost every second HIV patient is affected by neurocognitive disorders, which can lead to dementia. It has not as yet been fully understood how these disorders occur, but new research is shining a light on the culprit.... Read more »

  • September 3, 2014
  • 01:22 PM
  • 81 views

Adopting Shelter Dogs: Should Fido Lie Down or Play?

by CAPB in Companion Animal Psychology Blog

 If you go down to the shelter today, will you bring home a dog? A new study by Alexandra Protopopova and Clive Wynne (2014) finds that interactions between dogs and potential adopters predict the likelihood of adoption.Photo: Alexey Shinkevich / ShutterstockEvery year in the USA, 3-4 million healthy, potentially-adoptable, homeless animals are euthanized (AHA and PetSmart 2012). Many would be saved if there was a better understanding of how to increase adoptions from animal shelters. Previ........ Read more »

  • September 3, 2014
  • 09:46 AM
  • 87 views

Video Tip of the Week: NIH 3D Print Exchange

by Mary in OpenHelix

The other day I was joking about how I was 3D-printing a baby sweater–the old way, with yarn and knitting needles. And I also mentioned that I assumed my niece-in-law was 3D-printing the baby separately. I’ve been musing (and reading) about 3D printing a lot lately–sometimes the plastic model part, sometimes the bioprinting of tissues […]... Read more »

Murphy Sean V. (2014) 3D bioprinting of tissues and organs. Nature Biotechnology, 32(8), 773-785. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nbt.2958  

  • September 3, 2014
  • 08:01 AM
  • 93 views

The Kanisza Triangle: You Can’t Believe Your Eyes

by Rebecca A. Zarate in United Academics

How does the brain decide what the larger, gestalt picture is? From this demonstration, Kok and De Lange concluded it is “an interactive process between higher-order visual areas and V1, wherein activity in V1 is modulated in a highly specific way according to the perceptual hypothesis provided by higher-order areas.” In essence, higher areas of the brain (top-down processes) are making gestalt type guesses, expectations, and assumptions that affect what your senses perceive... Read more »

  • September 3, 2014
  • 08:00 AM
  • 84 views

Bacteria Are Intelligent Designers

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

The bacterial flagellum is quite an intricate system for such a “primitive” organism. New research is telling us about how the flagellum is assembled and how it is regulated. A series of new work is related to the switching of the torque in the C ring so that flagella can spin counter clockwise or clockwise without a change in proton ion gradient flow. A series of conformation changes in the FLiD alter the position of charge clouds so that opposite charges drive a turn in the opposit........ Read more »

  • September 3, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 68 views

“S/he is just not one of us…”

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

Just over a year ago, The Jury Expert published an article on bias and ambiguity in times of economic stress. The article was titled Does This Recession Make Me Look Black? –and it focused on how White Americans see racially ambiguous appearing others as in-group members until times are tough and then we see them […]

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Nice guys really do finish last! (Or at ........ Read more »

Kteily, N, Cotterill, S, Sidanius, J, Sheehy-Skeffington, J, & Bergh, R. (2014) “Not one of us”: Predictors and consequences of denying in-group characteristics to ambiguous targets. . Personality . info:/

  • September 3, 2014
  • 04:36 AM
  • 81 views

An observation-based classifier for rapid detection of autism risk

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"Keep clear of the moors"Among the many researchers and research groups admired on this blog for their contribution to the world of autism research, the name Dennis Wall is fast becoming a real favourite. Aside from mention of the words 'systems biology' in his profile at Stanford University, I'm particularly interested in the way the Wall research group are looking at trying to apply machine-learning approaches to things like autism assessment.I've covered a few of their past research reports w........ Read more »

M Duda, J A Kosmicki, & D P Wall. (2014) Testing the accuracy of an observation-based classifier for rapid detection of autism risk. Translational Psychiatry. info:/10.1038/tp.2014.65

  • September 3, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 81 views

Education and Interaction may be the Key to Successful Subacromial Impingement Syndrome Therapy

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Scapular mobilizations, sham mobilizations, and supervised exercise can help alleviate symptoms related to subacromial impingement syndrome but no intervention was most effective.... Read more »

  • September 2, 2014
  • 12:52 PM
  • 113 views

Epigenetics: Taking Control of the Music

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

When I try to explain epigenetics to someone, I like to use the musician metaphor. Your genes are the sheet music and how your body reads those genes, that is your body acting like a musician, making those notes it’s own. This is even more evident when you realize that all human cells contain essentially the same DNA sequence. Up until now we've had to be the audience to this genetic symphony, but new research is helping scientists take control of the music.... Read more »

Müller-Ott K, Erdel F, Matveeva A, Mallm JP, Rademacher A, Hahn M, Bauer C, Zhang Q, Kaltofen S, Schotta G.... (2014) Specificity, propagation, and memory of pericentric heterochromatin. Molecular systems biology, 10(8), 746. PMID: 25134515  

  • September 2, 2014
  • 10:41 AM
  • 86 views

Pigeon Gamblers Treat Risk Just Like Humans Do

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish

If you watch poker coverage on television, you probably won’t hear the commentators compare players to pigeons. Maybe they should. The birds don’t play a great game of hold ‘em, but the way they think about risk might be strikingly similar to the way we do. Researchers discovered this by putting humans and birds through […]The post Pigeon Gamblers Treat Risk Just Like Humans Do appeared first on Inkfish.... Read more »

Ludvig EA, Madan CR, Pisklak JM, & Spetch ML. (2014) Reward context determines risky choice in pigeons and humans. Biology letters, 10(8). PMID: 25165453  

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