Post List

  • September 8, 2014
  • 02:41 AM
  • 85 views

A Dangerous New Dish

by The Neurocritic in The Neurocritic

Bibimbop Brugmansia ** Do NOT try this at home.Edible flowers can make for a beautiful garnish on salads and trendy Brooklyn cocktails, but those decorative flourishes can be a disaster for the oblivious amateur. An unusual case report in BMC Research Notes summarizes what happens when you sprinkle toxic flower petals on your bibimbop (Kim et al., 2014).A 64 year old Koren woman came to the emergency room with incoherent speech and fluctuations in attention, orientation and comprehension. She ha........ Read more »

Evans Schultes, R., & Plowman, T. (1979) The ethnobotany of Brugmansia. Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 1(2), 147-164. DOI: 10.1016/0378-8741(79)90004-7  

  • September 7, 2014
  • 09:18 PM
  • 64 views

The effect of forefoot varus on the hip and knee and the effect of the hip and knee on forefoot supinatus …

by Craig Payne in Running Research Junkie

The effect of forefoot varus on the hip and knee and the effect of the hip and knee on forefoot supinatus …... Read more »

  • September 7, 2014
  • 03:30 PM
  • 61 views

Can You Hear Me Now?

by Kyle Harris in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Take Home Message: The use of a tuning fork in ruling out fractures is not currently recommended due to low diagnostic accuracy. Little clinical standards, low study quality and small sample size limits the results therefore more standardization and training should be done to improve its clinical efficiency.

In some situations radiographic imaging is not readily available and clinicians must attempt to assess an injury with other tools such as a tuning fork. Unfortunately, the diagnostic accu........ Read more »

  • September 7, 2014
  • 01:46 PM
  • 82 views

A new Hope for Muscle Wasting Diseases

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Muscle wasting diseases can be difficult to watch. They are typically slow and have a very painful progression, some to the point of not even being able to breath on ones own. But new research might change all that. Scientists have developed a novel technique to promote tissue repair in damaged muscles. The technique also creates a sustainable pool of muscle stem cells needed to support multiple rounds of muscle repair.... Read more »

Vittorio Sartorelli, & Alessandra Sacco. (2014) STAT3 signaling controls satellite cell expansion and skeletal muscle repair. Nature Medicine. info:/10.1038/nm.3656

  • September 7, 2014
  • 10:03 AM
  • 85 views

Fist Bump, Don't Handshake

by Viputheshwar Sitaraman in Draw Science

Fist bumps minimize contact time and surface area, diminishing germ transfer in terms of greetings--especially compared to handshakes.... Read more »

  • September 6, 2014
  • 06:34 PM
  • 80 views

Clustering of foot strike patterns when running

by Craig Payne in Running Research Junkie

Clustering of foot strike patterns when running... Read more »

  • September 6, 2014
  • 06:22 PM
  • 109 views

Is the Internet of Things the Real Thing?

by Aurametrix team in Health Technologies

The Internet of Things: an exciting new world with a digital nervous system or a nightmare where objects take decisions while we are unconscious?15 years ago, when the term was first coined, it was about assigning everything around us a unique identity with RFID tags, to enable all material things to talk to each other and save us time for gathering and using information. As RFID tags dropped below 1 cent cost, and sensors, modems and devices are getting smaller, smarter and cheaper, this vision........ Read more »

Ashton K. (2009) That 'Internet of Things' Thing, in the real world things matter more than ideas. RFID Journal. info:/

Schreier G. (2014) The internet of things for personalized health. Studies in health technology and informatics, 22-31. PMID: 24851958  

Perera, C., Zaslavsky, A., Christen, P., & Georgakopoulos, D. (2014) Sensing as a service model for smart cities supported by Internet of Things. Transactions on Emerging Telecommunications Technologies, 25(1), 81-93. DOI: 10.1002/ett.2704  

  • September 6, 2014
  • 02:11 PM
  • 67 views

Unpacking Recovery Part 5: Clinical Recovery without a Clinic?

by Andrea in Science of Eating Disorders


It can be somewhat controversial to suggest that untreated recovery from eating disorders is possible. Certainly, people have varied opinions about whether someone can enact the difficult behavioral and attitudinal changes necessary to recover without the help of (at the very least) a therapist and a dietitian. Nonetheless, we still hear stories about individuals who consider themselves recovered without having sought out external sources of professional support.
When I think about untreat........ Read more »

  • September 6, 2014
  • 12:10 PM
  • 108 views

Women and sexual assault: Unfortunate news…

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

I was debating about this new study. On one hand it’s important to share all sorts of different findings. On the other hand, my faith in humanity was more than just a little shaken, but there is no point on sweeping it under the rug. So disturbing news for women on college campuses, a new study indicates that female college students who are victims of sexual assault are at a much higher risk of becoming victims again. Please hold your disgust till the end…... Read more »

  • September 6, 2014
  • 06:26 AM
  • 131 views

“Cyranoids”: Stanley Milgram’s Creepiest Experiment

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

Imagine that someone else was controlling your actions. You would still look like you, and sound like you, but you wouldn’t be the one deciding what you did and what you said. Now consider: would anyone notice the difference? In this nightmarish scenario, you would be a “cyranoid” – in the terminology introduced by psychologist […]The post “Cyranoids”: Stanley Milgram’s Creepiest Experiment appeared first on Neuroskeptic.... Read more »

  • September 6, 2014
  • 05:38 AM
  • 90 views

Mind to mind transfer

by Janet Kwasniak in Neuro-patch

  I read the abstract of a new paper (see citation below) about brain-to-brain communication. I had been thinking while I read the title that we already do brain-to-brain communication – it’s called language. And sure enough the first sentence of the abstract said, “Human sensory and motor systems provide the natural means for the […]... Read more »

Grau C, Ginhoux R, Riera A, Nguyen TL, Chauvat H, Berg M, Amengual JL, Pascual-Leone A, & Ruffini G. (2014) Conscious Brain-to-Brain Communication in Humans Using Non-Invasive Technologies. PloS one, 9(8). PMID: 25137064  

  • September 5, 2014
  • 06:31 PM
  • 103 views

Higgs what?

by Marco Frasca in The Gauge Connection

In these days it has been announced the new version of Review of Particle Physics by the Particle Data Group (PDG). This is the bread and butter of any particle physicist and contains all the relevant data about this area of research. It is quite common for us to search the on-line version or using […]... Read more »

Marco Frasca. (2013) Scalar field theory in the strong self-interaction limit. Eur. Phys. J. C (2014) 74:2929. arXiv: 1306.6530v5

  • September 5, 2014
  • 06:28 PM
  • 90 views

Breaking research: A recent study in fruit flies suggests that sleep loss during childhood could lead to abnormal brain development

by Bethany Christmann in Fly on the Wall

Discussions about whether schools for children should start later have been making headlines recently, highlighting the importance of getting enough sleep at night. We all know how important sleep is for day-to-day performance—you’ve likely experienced firsthand how hard it can be to think and focus after a bad night’s sleep. Luckily, these effects are reversible: […]... Read more »

  • September 5, 2014
  • 01:56 PM
  • 123 views

Artificial Cells: They’re alive!!

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Frankenstein’s monster was (in the story) a scientific marvel that could not be matched. Growing up with the story, the idea of creating life where there was none was a feat that I had once thought was going to always be science fiction. Maybe this is why I was so surprised when I found out that scientists, using only a few ingredients, have successfully implemented a minimalistic model of the cell that can change its shape and move on its own.... Read more »

Keber, F., Loiseau, E., Sanchez, T., DeCamp, S., Giomi, L., Bowick, M., Marchetti, M., Dogic, Z., & Bausch, A. (2014) Topology and dynamics of active nematic vesicles. Science, 345(6201), 1135-1139. DOI: 10.1126/science.1254784  

  • September 5, 2014
  • 11:08 AM
  • 85 views

September 5, 2014

by Erin Campbell in HighMag Blog

It is so nice to have a friend who truly complements you…someone similar to you, but different enough to pick up the slack of your own shortcomings. Today’s image is from a paper about the Laverne and Shirley partnership of Ena/VASP and mDia2. Crawling cells extend finger-like filopodia to probe the environment for cues and to establish adhesion of the cell to the substrate. Filopodia are composed of parallel bundles of actin that are quickly dynamic. Countless actin regulators affec........ Read more »

Barzik, M., McClain, L., Gupton, S., & Gertler, F. (2014) Ena/VASP regulates mDia2-initiated filopodial length, dynamics, and function. Molecular Biology of the Cell, 25(17), 2604-2619. DOI: 10.1091/mbc.E14-02-0712  

  • September 5, 2014
  • 11:00 AM
  • 91 views

The Friday Five for 9/5/14

by Bill Sullivan in The 'Scope

A look at some of the neatest things science did this week, including solving the mystery of the "wandering stones", what coffee and alcohol do to your brain, and Lego economics!... Read more »

  • September 5, 2014
  • 10:58 AM
  • 105 views

Corals Engineer Their Own Currents

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish

There are few more monastic lives in the animal kingdom than a coral’s. In adulthood it gives up swimming to settle on the ocean floor, surround its spineless body with clones, and become a rock. Mouth facing the ocean, it waits passively for whatever drifts by—or maybe not so passively. Taking a closer look at […]The post Corals Engineer Their Own Currents appeared first on Inkfish.... Read more »

Orr H. Shapiro, Vicente I. Fernandez, Melissa Garren, Jeffrey S. Guasto, François P. Debaillon-Vesque, Esti Kramarsky-Winter, Assaf Vardi, & Roman Stocker. (2014) Vortical ciliary flows actively enhance mass transport in reef corals. PNAS. info:/10.1073/pnas.1323094111

  • September 5, 2014
  • 08:03 AM
  • 46 views

People's belief in free will is lower when they need to urinate or desire sex

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

Embodied or grounded cognition is the name for the idea that physical states affect our thoughts and emotions. It's a controversial field, but typical findings include people's judgments of social closeness being shaped by room temperature, and their attentional style by the clothes they wear. A new paper takes things further, asking whether bodily states affect people's philosophical beliefs, specifically their belief in the notion of free will, defined and measured here in the lay sense o........ Read more »

  • September 5, 2014
  • 05:04 AM
  • 110 views

Extremes of a self-limiting diet in autism

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I'll draw your attention to three papers in today's post which represent the extremes of where self-imposed dietary restrictions can potentially lead in relation to the autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Issues with diet - outside of use of diet as an intervention measure - are something which have been talked about quite a bit in the autism research literature (see here)."You look like a gangster"The first paper by Baird & Ravindranath [1] describes a case report of an 11-year old with ........ Read more »

Baird JS, & Ravindranath TM. (2014) Vitamin B Deficiencies in a Critically Ill Autistic Child With a Restricted Diet. Nutrition in clinical practice : official publication of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition. PMID: 25112945  

Gulko E, Collins LK, Murphy RC, Thornhill BA, & Taragin BH. (2014) MRI findings in pediatric patients with scurvy. Skeletal radiology. PMID: 25109378  

  • September 5, 2014
  • 04:49 AM
  • 76 views

FLCN modulates autophagy via its interactions with GABARAP and ULK1

by Lizzie Perdeaux in BHD Research Blog

A number of studies have suggested that FLCN regulates autophagy, although precisely how was unknown. A recent study by Dr Elaine Dunlop and Dr Andy Tee from Cardiff University report that FLCN regulates autophagy through interactions with GABARAP and ULK1. … Continue reading →... Read more »

Dunlop EA, Seifan S, Claessens T, Behrends C, Kamps MA, Rozycka E, Kemp AJ, Nookala RK, Blenis J, Coull BJ.... (2014) FLCN, a novel autophagy component, interacts with GABARAP and is regulated by ULK1 phosphorylation. Autophagy, 10(10). PMID: 25126726  

join us!

Do you write about peer-reviewed research in your blog? Use ResearchBlogging.org to make it easy for your readers — and others from around the world — to find your serious posts about academic research.

If you don't have a blog, you can still use our site to learn about fascinating developments in cutting-edge research from around the world.

Register Now

Research Blogging is powered by SMG Technology.

To learn more, visit seedmediagroup.com.