Post List

  • July 16, 2014
  • 08:30 AM
  • 80 views

Do Puppy Tests Predict Adult Dog Behaviour?

by CAPB in Companion Animal Psychology Blog

A new study follows dogs from neonates to adults to find out if puppy tests predict adult behaviour.Photo: Mikkel Bigandt / ShutterstockLots of people want to know if a puppy’s behaviour will tell you what it will be like as an adult dog. From people choosing a pet dog from a breeder’s litter, to organizations training service, police or military dogs, making the right choice of puppy could really help later on. But there have long been concerns that puppy personality tests don’t necessari........ Read more »

McMillan, F., Serpell, J., Duffy, D., Masaoud, E., & Dohoo, I. (2013) Differences in behavioral characteristics between dogs obtained as puppies from pet stores and those obtained from noncommercial breeders. Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 242(10), 1359-1363. info:/

  • July 16, 2014
  • 08:05 AM
  • 121 views

East To West And Back Again

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

Sunflowers were named by Linnaeus for their round shape and bright color that reminded him of the sun, not because they follow the sun. But they do seem to turn to face the sun each day. A new review has looked at the molecular mechanisms that control the movement of the apex of the plant. But questions remain – how does the plant turn back to the east at night? Why is it that the flower turns but the leaves do not? Why does the movement stop when the flower matures?... Read more »

  • July 16, 2014
  • 07:12 AM
  • 98 views

Want To Look Sexier? Pick The Right Crowd

by Gunnar de Winter in United Academics

Earlier modern work has shown that men will invest more resources in potential mates when there are a lot of guys and few women around. Basically, the rarer the women in a group, the more effort the men will expend in order to impress them. Now a new study...... Read more »

  • July 16, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 69 views

The Workplace Ostracism Scale: Making the subjective objective?

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

It’s always tough to measure something that seems very subjective. Like ostracism. Are you being ostracized (excluded, left out, or shunned) or are you just way too sensitive? Intrepid researchers have pushed forward though and brought us the Workplace Ostracism Scale. Ostracism is very much like incivility which is seen as very hard to objectively […]

Related posts:
Fat bias in the workplace
Would you rather be harassed or ostracized at work?
Who benefits from racism in the workplace........ Read more »

Ferris DL, Brown DJ, Berry JW, & Lian H. (2008) The development and validation of the Workplace Ostracism Scale. The Journal of Applied Psychology, 93(6), 1348-66. PMID: 19025252  

  • July 16, 2014
  • 06:15 AM
  • 108 views

Everything you always wanted to know about language but were too afraid to ask

by Richard Kunert in Brain's Idea

The Max Planck Institute in Nijmegen has started a great initiative which tries nothing less than answer all your questions about language. How does it work? 1) Go to this website: http://www.mpi.nl/q-a/questions-and-answers 2) See whether your question has already been answered 3) If not, scroll to the bottom and ask a question yourself. The answers […]... Read more »

  • July 16, 2014
  • 04:50 AM
  • 89 views

Organic acids as biomarkers of autism?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Whilst I am always a little cautious about the use of the word 'biomarker' when applied to a heterogeneous condition like autism, even the autisms, I am nevertheless always intrigued at any reasonable prospect reported in the scientific literature. So it was when I read the paper by Joanna Kałużna-Czaplińska and colleagues [1] and their assertion that "there is a significant metabolic difference between autistic and non-autistic children" and onwards that "21 metabolites were identified ........ Read more »

  • July 16, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 60 views

Feel Like Phoning-In Your Concussion Symptoms? Not so Fast

by Kyle Harris in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Athletes who have sustained a concussion exhibit a wide range of symptom severity scores when surveyed through text-messaging at various times during the day.... Read more »

  • July 15, 2014
  • 02:47 PM
  • 63 views

Scientists Take Snapshots of Photosynthetic Water Oxidation

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

An international collaboration of scientists led by researchers with the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has taken detailed “snapshots” of the four photon-step cycle for water oxidation in photosystem II, a large protein complex in green plants.... Read more »

Kern, J., Tran, R., Alonso-Mori, R., Koroidov, S., Echols, N., Hattne, J., Ibrahim, M., Gul, S., Laksmono, H., Sierra, R.... (2014) Taking snapshots of photosynthetic water oxidation using femtosecond X-ray diffraction and spectroscopy. Nature Communications. DOI: 10.1038/ncomms5371  

  • July 15, 2014
  • 01:30 PM
  • 84 views

Schizophrenia and Autism: A New Connection

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Autism and Schizophrenia, at first glance there probably isn’t a whole lot in common other than they are disorders that fall in that lovely book the DCM-5. The brain is […]... Read more »

Chie Shimamoto1,, Tetsuo Ohnishi, Motoko Maekawa, Akiko Watanabe, Hisako Ohba, Ryoichi Arai, Yoshimi Iwayama, Yasuko Hisano, Tomoko Toyota, Manabu Toyoshima.... (2014) Functional characterization of FABP3, 5 and 7 gene variants identified in schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorder and mouse behavioral studies. Human Molecular Genetics. info:/10.1093/hmg/ddu369

  • July 15, 2014
  • 12:18 PM
  • 74 views

Here’s What Happens When You Put Camera Traps in Trees

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish

The world holds very few unexplored places between zero and six feet off the ground. If humans can walk right up to it and take a picture, we probably already have. But the tops of the trees, like the bottom of the ocean, are a different story. “We know so much less about arboreal mammal […]The post Here’s What Happens When You Put Camera Traps in Trees appeared first on Inkfish.... Read more »

Gregory, T., Carrasco Rueda, F., Deichmann, J., Kolowski, J., & Alonso, A. (2014) Arboreal camera trapping: taking a proven method to new heights. Methods in Ecology and Evolution, 5(5), 443-451. DOI: 10.1111/2041-210X.12177  

  • July 15, 2014
  • 11:50 AM
  • 75 views

Breaking Up is Hard to Do: Photosynthesis, Water-Splitting, and the OEC

by Melissa Chernick in Science Storiented

A very very cool paper was recently published online. The paper details a study that shows the first images of water splitting apart during photosynthesis. So pick you jaw up off the table and we’ll get into the nitty-gritty details. Let’s start by accessing your long-term memory, dragging out some of that basic biology information you buried after high school and grabbing on to that dusty file about photosynthesis. If you remember, plants have little green, bean-shaped energy factories in t........ Read more »

Kupitz, C., Basu, S., Grotjohann, I., Fromme, R., Zatsepin, N., Rendek, K., Hunter, M., Shoeman, R., White, T., Wang, D.... (2014) Serial time-resolved crystallography of photosystem II using a femtosecond X-ray laser. Nature. DOI: 10.1038/nature13453  

  • July 15, 2014
  • 10:13 AM
  • 72 views

Hosting the World Cup: is it worth it?

by Flora Brils in United Academics

The World Cup has come to an end. Brazil asks: do the costs outweigh the benefits? An economic analysis. ... Read more »

  • July 15, 2014
  • 08:53 AM
  • 69 views

Understanding Privileged Access to Water from the Dead

by Katy Meyers in Bones Don't Lie

As humans, we cannot survive without water. In the first world, we are privileged to have consistent access to fresh clean water. In many countries, access to water is based […]... Read more »

Lightfoot, E., Šlaus, M., & O'Connell, T. (2014) Water consumption in Iron Age, Roman, and Early Medieval Croatia. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 154(4), 535-543. DOI: 10.1002/ajpa.22544  

  • July 15, 2014
  • 08:00 AM
  • 77 views

The Pressure of the World Cup Penalty Kick

by THE 'SCOPE in The 'Scope

Tim Howard was brilliant in goal for the United States at the 2014 World Cup. Flying all over the place, catching, punching, kicking – he looked like he was protecting his family home from post-apocalyptic cannibals. It was very impressive, but the US went out against Belgium 2-1 in extra time, despite Howard’s 17 saves, the most in a single World Cup game in 50 years. Tim Howard had a great game for the US, heck, a great tournament. So great in fact, that Wikipedia temporarily&nbs........ Read more »

BENJAMIN NOËL and JOHN VAN DER KAMP. (2012) Gaze behaviour during the soccer penalty kick: An investigation of the effects of strategy and anxiety. Int. J. Sport Psychol., 1-20. info:/

  • July 15, 2014
  • 04:33 AM
  • 85 views

It's possible to "forget" unwanted habits

by Christian Jarrett in BPS Research Digest

New research shows that we can weaken and even undo practised habits by deliberately deciding to forget them.Gesine Dreisbach and Karl-Heinz Bäuml from Regensburg University first instilled new habits in their participants by presenting them with German words and training them over many trials to make the same response to each word - a left-handed key-press for half of them, a right-hand response for the remainder.Later, participants had to categorise the same words by gender, with key-presses ........ Read more »

Dreisbach, G., & Bauml, K. (2014) Don't Do It Again! Directed Forgetting of Habits. Psychological Science, 25(6), 1242-1248. DOI: 10.1177/0956797614526063  

  • July 15, 2014
  • 03:38 AM
  • 50 views

Treating Sports Injuries The Drug Free Way

by Pushkar Sikka in Workout Trends

Did you just roll your ankle while playing your favorite sport? Has the back pain been bothering you for a while now? Or did your knee just suffer a bang because of that fall? One of the methods here may just be the answer of getting relief from that pain and treating it the drug free way. […]
The post Treating Sports Injuries The Drug Free Way appeared first on .
... Read more »

Garra G, Singer AJ, Leno R, Taira BR, Gupta N, Mathaikutty B, & Thode HJ. (2010) Heat or cold packs for neck and back strain: a randomized controlled trial of efficacy. Academic emergency medicine : official journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine, 17(5), 484-9. PMID: 20536800  

French SD, Cameron M, Walker BF, Reggars JW, & Esterman AJ. (2006) A Cochrane review of superficial heat or cold for low back pain. Spine, 31(9), 998-1006. PMID: 16641776  

  • July 14, 2014
  • 11:08 PM
  • 84 views

Post-traumatic amnesia: why Kramer can’t remember his play in the World Cup Final

by Shelly Fan in Neurorexia

Image: screamer.deadspin.com It was 17 minutes into his second World Cup appearance when German midfielder Christoph Kramer slammed brutally into his Argentine opponent. Kramer’s head swerved...... Read more »

  • July 14, 2014
  • 03:37 PM
  • 63 views

Laser Helps Understand Inner Workings of Solar Panels

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

Believe it or not we don’t totally understand how solar cells work, particularly organic thin-film photovoltaics. But scientists Canada, London and Cyprus have recently used lasers to shed some light into the process, which could help make more efficient solar panels tomorrow.... Read more »

Provencher, F., Bérubé, N., Parker, A., Greetham, G., Towrie, M., Hellmann, C., Côté, M., Stingelin, N., Silva, C., & Hayes, S. (2014) Direct observation of ultrafast long-range charge separation at polymer–fullerene heterojunctions. Nature Communications. DOI: 10.1038/ncomms5288  

  • July 14, 2014
  • 02:48 PM
  • 82 views

Can We Grasp The Brain’s Complexity?

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

An entertaining paper just out in Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience offers a panoramic view of the whole of neuroscience: Enlarging the scope: grasping brain complexity The paper is remarkable not just for its content but also for its style. Some examples: How does the brain work? This nagging question is an habitué from the top […]The post Can We Grasp The Brain’s Complexity? appeared first on Neuroskeptic.... Read more »

Tognoli E, & Kelso JA. (2014) Enlarging the scope: grasping brain complexity. Frontiers in systems neuroscience, 122. PMID: 25009476  

  • July 14, 2014
  • 02:27 PM
  • 62 views

History of neuroscience: Hodgkin and Huxley

by neurosci in Neuroscientifically Challenged







Hodgkin and Huxley used the large axons of the giant squid to measure voltage changes during an action potential.






By the late 1930s, researchers had come to understand several important things about the conduction of signals within neurons. For example, they knew that signaling within neurons is electrical in nature (as opposed to signaling between neurons, which is usually chemical), and that it occurs in bursts of activity called action potentials. And th........ Read more »

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