Post List

  • July 11, 2014
  • 10:21 AM
  • 109 views

Part 2. Epigenetics. Rat Tounges & Ham Sandwiches Can Influence Children

by The Lab Hippo in The Lab Hippo

Picture your parents having sex. No..no good, too weird? OK then, picture your grandparents having sex. Even weirder? Fine, picture your great-grandparents having sex. That one might not be as bad. Chances are you never met your great-grandparents, which makes them somewhat strangers to you. You had eight great-grandparents and though you might not even know their names, about 12.5 percent of your DNA was inherited from them. Now imagine your great-grandmother eating a ham sandwich while having ........ Read more »

Pembrey, M., Bygren, L., Kaati, G., Edvinsson, S., Northstone, K., Sjöström, M., & Golding, J. (2005) Sex-specific, male-line transgenerational responses in humans. European Journal of Human Genetics, 14(2), 159-166. DOI: 10.1038/sj.ejhg.5201538  

  • July 11, 2014
  • 10:19 AM
  • 115 views

Epigenetics. Rat Tounges & Ham Sandwiches Can Influence Children (Part 1)

by The Lab Hippo in The Lab Hippo

There’s a concept in biology that has begun to break into mainstream culture that makes the mishmosh of genetics even more complicated. It’s called ‘epigenetics’, and it can explain how our environment, such as what we eat and breath, can influence our DNA. Biologists have known about epigenetics for some time, but it seems to have gained widespread traction lately largely due to findings that a mother can influence her unborn child’s DNA during pregnancy. This is called ‘intergenera........ Read more »

Rönn T, Volkov P, Davegårdh C, Dayeh T, Hall E, Olsson AH, Nilsson E, Tornberg A, Dekker Nitert M, Eriksson KF.... (2013) A six months exercise intervention influences the genome-wide DNA methylation pattern in human adipose tissue. PLoS genetics, 9(6). PMID: 23825961  

Weaver, I., Cervoni, N., Champagne, F., D'Alessio, A., Sharma, S., Seckl, J., Dymov, S., Szyf, M., & Meaney, M. (2004) Epigenetic programming by maternal behavior. Nature Neuroscience, 7(8), 847-854. DOI: 10.1038/nn1276  

  • July 11, 2014
  • 10:16 AM
  • 104 views

Adults, like children, have a tendency to think vision is more informative than it is

by Christian Jarrett in BPS Research Digest

Among the cute mistakes that children make, one is to overestimate how much information they can garner through vision. For instance, asked to judge whether they can tell apart two identical-looking, but differently weighted (or different sounding) objects, simply by looking at them, five-year-olds tend to say Yes. Now an intriguing new paper suggests this is an error that we adults fail to completely outgrow.In the second and more persuasive of their experiments, Jessica Wang and her colleagues........ Read more »

Wang JJ, Diana Miletich D, Ramsey R, & Samson D. (2014) Adults see vision to be more informative than it is. Quarterly journal of experimental psychology (2006), 1-14. PMID: 24853581  

  • July 11, 2014
  • 10:15 AM
  • 93 views

Can antioxidants accelerate cancer growth? Why you shouldn’t smoke and drink Vitamin Water

by The Lab Hippo in The Lab Hippo

Recently a paper was published that showed adding antioxidants, such as vitamin E, to the diet of mice accelerated the growth of lung tumors. This finding contradicts the commonly held belief that antioxidants act to protect us from cancer and other diseases.... Read more »

Sayin VI, Ibrahim MX, Larsson E, Nilsson JA, Lindahl P, & Bergo MO. (2014) Antioxidants accelerate lung cancer progression in mice. Science translational medicine, 6(221). PMID: 24477002  

  • July 11, 2014
  • 09:12 AM
  • 85 views

Night-Time Lights Intensity Indicates Regional Favoritism

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

Researchers at Monash University and the University of St Gallen have used satellite data on night-time light intensity and information about the birthplaces of political leaders in 126 countries to pinpoint regional favoritism.... Read more »

Hodler, R., & Raschky, P. (2014) Regional Favoritism. The Quarterly Journal of Economics, 129(2), 995-1033. DOI: 10.1093/qje/qju004  

  • July 11, 2014
  • 06:17 AM
  • 35 views

What ‘P.S. I Love You’ Taught Me About Blue Stress

by Samiiksha Rohilla in Workout Trends

Last evening, while watching people passing by my lane, I realized how lucky it is to be happy and alive. It wasn’t the same with me a few months back. I used to prefer staying alone. I had locked my guitar inside the cupboard. And I had quit my work. Was I in a state of […]
The post What ‘P.S. I Love You’ Taught Me About Blue Stress appeared first on .
... Read more »

  • July 11, 2014
  • 05:24 AM
  • 45 views

Reward Prediction Error Signals are Meta-Representational

by Doctor Spurt / David Spurrett in Effortless Incitement

Critical discussion of Nicholas Shea's (2014) paper with the same title. (Trying import because embedded citation didn't get picked up after 48 hours.)... Read more »

  • July 11, 2014
  • 05:24 AM
  • 39 views

Reward Prediction Error Signals are Meta-Representational

by Doctor Spurt / David Spurrett in Common Currencies

Explanatory and constructive discussion of a recent paper by Nicholas Shea with the title "Reward Prediction Error Signals are Meta-Representational". Contains Research Blogging citation code, but has not been picked up in nearly four days.... Read more »

  • July 11, 2014
  • 05:17 AM
  • 90 views

Get Your 8 Hours Sleep: How Your Brain Makes Memories

by Rebekah Morrow in United Academics

Conventional wisdom says that sleep is an important part of learning (remember your teachers telling you to get a good night’s sleep before a big test?), but what is your brain actually doing while you are sleeping? New studies confirm and explain this notion... Read more »

Yang G, Lai CS, Cichon J, Ma L, Li W, & Gan WB. (2014) Sleep promotes branch-specific formation of dendritic spines after learning. Science (New York, N.Y.), 344(6188), 1173-8. PMID: 24904169  

Euston DR, & Steenland HW. (2014) Neuroscience. Memories--getting wired during sleep. Science (New York, N.Y.), 344(6188), 1087-8. PMID: 24904140  

  • July 11, 2014
  • 04:53 AM
  • 75 views

FLCN is important for cardiomyocyte development

by Lizzie Perdeaux in BHD Research Blog

Cardiac hypertrophy is an adaptive response that occurs following increased stress on the heart wall, and can be caused by strenuous exercise, hypertension, heart attack or heart valve disease. In some cases, this can lead to heart failure. Although the … Continue reading →... Read more »

Hasumi Y, Baba M, Hasumi H, Huang Y, Lang M, Reindorf R, Oh HB, Sciarretta S, Nagashima K, Haines DC.... (2014) Folliculin (Flcn) inactivation leads to murine cardiac hypertrophy through mTORC1 deregulation. Human molecular genetics. PMID: 24908670  

  • July 11, 2014
  • 04:48 AM
  • 74 views

Maternal C-Reactive Protein (CRP) and offspring schizophrenia

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

A big quote to start this post: "This finding provides the most robust evidence to date that maternal inflammation may play a significant role in schizophrenia, with possible implications for identifying preventive strategies and pathogenic mechanisms in schizophrenia and other neurodevelopmental disorders".Ophelia @ Wikipedia The source for this quote was the paper by Sarah Canetta and colleagues [1] based on an analysis of serum samples from mums for C-reactive protein (CRP) as ........ Read more »

Canetta, S., Sourander, A., Surcel, H., Hinkka-Yli-Salomäki, S., Leiviskä, J., Kellendonk, C., McKeague, I., & Brown, A. (2014) Elevated Maternal C-Reactive Protein and Increased Risk of Schizophrenia in a National Birth Cohort. American Journal of Psychiatry. DOI: 10.1176/appi.ajp.2014.13121579  

  • July 11, 2014
  • 01:23 AM
  • 79 views

When running, lean forward at the ankle or the hip?

by Craig Payne in Running Research Junkie

When running, lean forward at the ankle or the hip?... Read more »

  • July 11, 2014
  • 12:15 AM
  • 73 views

Remote CPR Skills Testing Online - A Crazy Idea?

by Rogue Medic in Rogue Medic

On the MedicCast, Jamie Davis interviews Roy Shaw of SUMO about a method of remote CPR certification for health care providers.

"The Single Use Manikin Option, or SUMO™, is an AHA-compliant way of getting certified in CPR completely online.[1]"

What different ways of dealing with certification/recertification problems should we use?... Read more »

Sutton RM, Niles D, Meaney PA, Aplenc R, French B, Abella BS, Lengetti EL, Berg RA, Helfaer MA, Nadkarni V. (2011) Low-Dose, High-Frequency CPR Training Improves Skill Retention of In-Hospital Pediatric Providers. PEDIATRICS, 128(1). DOI: 10.1542/peds.2010-2105d  

  • July 10, 2014
  • 05:58 PM
  • 89 views

Sponge-Like Material Helps Li-Ion Batteries Run Longer

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have developed a new porous, sponge-like material that can be used as an anti-pulverization structure for high-performance lithium-ion battery anodes.... Read more »

  • July 10, 2014
  • 03:32 PM
  • 82 views

July 10, 2014

by Erin Campbell in HighMag Blog

Do your thoughts and feelings have colors? Do you feel red with rage during traffic, or green with envy when your lady swoons over Ryan Gosling? A recent methods paper introduces a very cool technique that allows the visualization and measurement of voltage within an excited neuron. Biologists build tools that are ideally accurate, fast, and non-damaging to the cells and organisms on which they are used. In a recent paper in Nature Methods, Hochbaum and colleagues describe the improved techn........ Read more »

Hochbaum, D., Zhao, Y., Farhi, S., Klapoetke, N., Werley, C., Kapoor, V., Zou, P., Kralj, J., Maclaurin, D., Smedemark-Margulies, N.... (2014) All-optical electrophysiology in mammalian neurons using engineered microbial rhodopsins. Nature Methods. DOI: 10.1038/nmeth.3000  

  • July 10, 2014
  • 01:59 PM
  • 111 views

Don’t Listen to the Voices: Understanding Consciousness

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

There is a voice in my head. Don't worry it's mine... I think [a story for another time I'm sure], but why is my voice inside my head? What causes me to hear myself while I type these very words, or even better you to hear them in your voice as you read them? Consciousness is a complex and very confusing thing. I think therefore I am? Science has had trouble cracking that nut and philosophy just won't cut it in the realm of neuroscience. [...]... Read more »

Paller, K., & Suzuki, S. (2014) The source of consciousness. Trends in Cognitive Sciences. DOI: 10.1016/j.tics.2014.05.012  

  • July 10, 2014
  • 12:18 PM
  • 70 views

Learning for Survival? Venom Overrides Other Snake Categories

by amikulak in Daily Observations

We deal with the world around us by putting it into categories. We are constantly trying to understand the things we encounter by classifying them: Is this a food I […]... Read more »

  • July 10, 2014
  • 11:19 AM
  • 88 views

Haha, kkkk, 555, LOL, jaja: Globalization Through Internet Jokes

by Nura Rutten in United Academics

In a recent article from Shifman, Levy and Thelwall, internet jokes are found to serve as an important and powerful agent of globalization and americanization. To research the role of internet jokes, they look at the concept of “user-generated globalization”, where internet users are the focal points through which user-generated content (in this case jokes) is translated, customized and distributed across the globe.... Read more »

Shifman, L., Levy, H., & Thelwall, M. (2014) Internet Jokes: The Secret Agents of Globalization?. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication. DOI: 10.1111/jcc4.12082  

  • July 10, 2014
  • 07:17 AM
  • 108 views

Can a Failed Schizophrenia Drug Prevent PTSD?

by The Neurocritic in The Neurocritic

In the 2000s, enthusiasm was high that a novel class of drugs would reach the market as blockbuster treatments for psychiatric disorders. These drugs act on receptors for a group of neuropeptides known as tachykinins (or neurokinins). These peptides — substance P (SP), neurokinin A (NkA), and neurokinin B (NkB) — function as neurotransmitters or neuromodulators in the central nervous system, but are quite different from the usual monoamines targeted by current psychotropic medications prescr........ Read more »

  • July 10, 2014
  • 05:00 AM
  • 53 views

By treating depression, do we also treat suicidality? The answer is far from straightforward

by Christian Jarrett in BPS Research Digest

By guest blogger James Coyne.Edgar Allan Poe’s fictional detective C. Auguste Dupin warns against tackling questions that are too complicated to test, but too fascinating to give up. Whether psychotherapy or medication can reduce suicidality is probably such a question. Particularly if we are really interested in whether treatments can reduce attempted suicides, not whether they change patients’ answers in an interview or on a questionnaire.There is no doubt about the clinical and publi........ Read more »

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