Post List

  • January 3, 2017
  • 02:56 PM
  • 365 views

Provided Examples vs. Generated Examples

by Joshua Fisher in Text Savvy

For learning declarative concepts in a domain and then identifying those concepts in novel real-world situations, provided examples proved to be better than student-generated examples for both long-term learning and for instructional efficiency. The second experiment in the study replicated these findings.... Read more »

  • January 3, 2017
  • 07:01 AM
  • 240 views

Observation of quasi-periodic solar radio bursts associated with propagating fast-mode waves by C. R. Goddard et al.*

by CESRA in Solar Radio Science

Flaring activity on the Sun triggers waves and oscillations in the solar corona. The study of these waves and oscillations allows comparisons to magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory and modelling to be made, and seismological inversions based on this comparison allow local plasma parameters to be measured indirectly (e.g. De Moortel & [...]... Read more »

  • January 3, 2017
  • 06:28 AM
  • 274 views

Suicidality in children and young adults with 'high-functioning' autism

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"Consistent with the previous findings, [the] rate of suicidality is higher in individuals with ASD [autism spectrum disorder]."That was one of the conclusions reported in the paper by Sevcan Karakoç Demirkaya and colleagues [1] (open-access) yet again touching on a most important topic when it comes to autism, particularly the part of the autism spectrum labelled as 'high-functioning'. Personally, I'm not a great fan of the 'functioning' description typically added to autism to ........ Read more »

  • January 3, 2017
  • 06:00 AM
  • 32 views

How Did People of Chaco Canyon Grow Their Food? Expert Says, They Didn’t

by Blake de Pastino in Western Digs

Recently, researchers have been at odds over a simple, central question in Southwestern history: How did the people of Chaco Canyon manage to grow food in such an arid environment?

... Read more »

  • January 2, 2017
  • 08:31 AM
  • 200 views

Research describes the physiology of Dimorphandra garneriana

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective | Press Releases

Researchers at the Federal University of Paraíba, in Areia, Paraíba state, Brazil, described the physiology of Dimorphandra garneriana and demonstrated that this forest specie does not tolerate water stress in its initial stages of development. … Read More →... Read more »

Faccin, T., Kommers, G., Galiza, G., Pupin, R., Madureira, R., & Lemos, R. (2016) Chronic liver disease in cattle associated with ingestion of Brachiaria spp. Ciência Rural, 46(11), 2036-2042. DOI: 10.1590/0103-8478cr20160297  

  • January 2, 2017
  • 04:30 AM
  • 263 views

How Much Do You Know About How Sunscreen Affects Thermoregulation?

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Athletes need to use sunscreen when exercising outdoors; however, they need to be selective and ensure the sunscreen is not impeding effective sweating.... Read more »

Aburto-Corona, J., & Aragón-Vargas, L. (2016) Sunscreen Use and Sweat Production in Men and Women. Journal of Athletic Training, 51(9), 696-700. DOI: 10.4085/1062-6050-51.11.01  

  • January 2, 2017
  • 04:06 AM
  • 260 views

This Month in Blastocystis Research (DEC 2016)

by Christen Rune Stensvold in Blastocystis Parasite Blog

2016 is coming to an end, and in the last post of the year, I highlight three of the most important articles on Blastocystis published in 2016.... Read more »

Scanlan PD, Knight R, Song SJ, Ackermann G, & Cotter PD. (2016) Prevalence and genetic diversity of Blastocystis in family units living in the United States. Infection, genetics and evolution : journal of molecular epidemiology and evolutionary genetics in infectious diseases, 95-97. PMID: 27545648  

Kurt Ö, Doğruman Al F, & Tanyüksel M. (2016) Eradication of Blastocystis in humans: Really necessary for all?. Parasitology international, 65(6 Pt B), 797-801. PMID: 26780545  

  • January 1, 2017
  • 01:20 AM
  • 231 views

Antibiotic cream is NOT 100% effective in preventing Lyme disease

by Microbe Fan in Spirochetes Unwound

A topical antibiotic cream applied to tick bites did not perform any better than placebo in preventing Lyme disease, according to results of a randomized clinical trial conducted in Europe.  The study was published in Lancet Infectious Diseases.I wasn't planning to blog about the study, but I changed my mind after a reader emailed me a link to a news article reporting that the antibiotic cream was 100% effective.  The lead investigator even claimed, "None of the test subjects went on t........ Read more »

Schwameis M, Kündig T, Huber G, von Bidder L, Meinel L, Weisser R, Aberer E, Härter G, Weinke T, Jelinek T.... (2016) Topical azithromycin for the prevention of Lyme borreliosis: a randomised, placebo-controlled, phase 3 efficacy trial. The Lancet. Infectious Diseases. PMID: 28007428  

  • December 31, 2016
  • 10:52 AM
  • 427 views

No Need To Worry About False Positives in fMRI?

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

Earlier this year, neuroscience was shaken by the publication in PNAS of Cluster failure: Why fMRI inferences for spatial extent have inflated false-positive rates. In this paper, Anders Eklund, Thomas E. Nichols and Hans Knutsson reported that commonly used software for analysing fMRI data produces many false-positives.



But now, Boston College neuroscientist Scott D. Slotnick has criticized Eklund et al.'s alarming conclusions in a new piece in Cognitive Neuroscience.



In my view, ... Read more »

  • December 31, 2016
  • 07:13 AM
  • 291 views

Population Differences in Androgens Fail to Support Differential-K Theory

by Scott McGreal in Eye on Psych

A recent paper attempts to test predictions of Differential-K Theory about race differences using data on population differences in androgens.Close examination of this data shows that the predictions fail.... Read more »

Dutton, E., van der Linden, D., & Lynn, R. (2016) Population differences in androgen levels: A test of the Differential K theory. Personality and Individual Differences, 289-295. info:/

  • December 30, 2016
  • 06:30 PM
  • 231 views

This Month in Blastocystis Research (DEC 2016)

by Christen Rune Stensvold in Blastocystis Parasite Blog

2016 is coming to an end, and in the last post of the year, I highlight three of the most important articles on Blastocystis published in 2016.... Read more »

Scanlan PD, Knight R, Song SJ, Ackermann G, & Cotter PD. (2016) Prevalence and genetic diversity of Blastocystis in family units living in the United States. Infection, genetics and evolution : journal of molecular epidemiology and evolutionary genetics in infectious diseases, 95-97. PMID: 27545648  

Kurt Ö, Doğruman Al F, & Tanyüksel M. (2016) Eradication of Blastocystis in humans: Really necessary for all?. Parasitology international, 65(6 Pt B), 797-801. PMID: 26780545  

  • December 30, 2016
  • 02:51 PM
  • 260 views

What is Turmeric and How to Use it to Prevent of Heart Diseases

by Maggie Martin in United Academics

If you are thinking of using turmeric for heart disease, first understand how it works and then know how it is supposed to be consumed. Turmeric works in numerous ways to boost heart health. It is considered a powerful antioxidant with an active ingredient known as curcumin, responsible for the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antiseptic properties of turmeric.... Read more »

Govindarajan, V., & Stahl, W. (2009) Turmeric — chemistry, technology, and quality. C R C Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition, 12(3), 199-301. DOI: 10.1080/10408398009527278  

  • December 30, 2016
  • 12:20 PM
  • 255 views

Yang-Mills theory paper gets published!

by Marco Frasca in The Gauge Connection

Exact solutions of quantum field theories are very rare and, normally, refer to toy models and pathological cases. Quite recently, I put on arxiv a pair of papers presenting exact solutions both of the Higgs sector of the Standard Model and the Yang-Mills theory made just of gluons. The former appeared a few month ago […]... Read more »

Marco Frasca. (2015) A theorem on the Higgs sector of the Standard Model. Eur. Phys. J. Plus (2016) 131: 199. arXiv: 1504.02299v3

Marco Frasca. (2015) Quantum Yang-Mills field theory. arXiv. arXiv: 1509.05292v1

Carl M. Bender, Kimball A. Milton, & Van M. Savage. (1999) Solution of Schwinger-Dyson Equations for ${\cal PT}$-Symmetric Quantum Field Theory. Phys.Rev.D62:085001,2000. arXiv: hep-th/9907045v1

  • December 30, 2016
  • 07:05 AM
  • 236 views

Annual review 2016

by Joana Guedes in BHD Research Blog

2016 has been a busy year for BHD research. With the new year approaching, this week’s blog will review the studies we’ve particularly enjoyed writing about and revisit the year’s highlights.... Read more »

Gupta, N., Sunwoo, B., & Kotloff, R. (2016) Birt-Hogg-Dubé Syndrome. Clinics in Chest Medicine, 37(3), 475-486. DOI: 10.1016/j.ccm.2016.04.010  

  • December 30, 2016
  • 05:00 AM
  • 237 views

Friday Fellow: Peacock Spikemoss

by Piter Boll in Earthling Nature

by Piter Kehoma Boll This is the last Friday Fellow of the year and I decided to choose a beautiful and little known plant, the peacock spikemoss, more commonly known as Willdenow’s spikemoss or peacock fern, and scientifically known as Selaginella … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • December 29, 2016
  • 08:20 PM
  • 289 views

Believe in miracles... and yourself

by Aurametrix team in Aurametrix Blog

End of the year is a very special time as Holiday lights melt away our inner Grinch and we start to believe in miracles and new beginnings. ​Belief is not a religious phenomenon. It is our way of coping with the future and finding existential meaning. Scientific studies show that belief in miracles contributes to greater life satisfaction. Belief in science and technological progress can make people satisfied with their lives even more. The stronger the sense of personal control, the higher s........ Read more »

  • December 29, 2016
  • 05:57 AM
  • 312 views

The Myth of "Darwin's Body-Snatchers"

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

Did Charles Darwin's thirst for skulls contribute to the near-extinction of the Aboriginal Tasmanian people?





If you believe certain creationists, Darwin sought examples of Tasmanian skulls in order to prove that this unfortunate race was a 'missing link' between humans and apes. However, according to John van Wyhe in a new paper called Darwin's body-snatchers?, this story has zero basis in fact.
As a Darwin scholar, I thought I had heard all the myths concerning Charles Darwin but on... Read more »

van Wyhe J. (2016) Darwin's body-snatchers?. Endeavour. PMID: 28012688  

  • December 28, 2016
  • 05:00 AM
  • 249 views

Sometimes academics do overthink things

by Craig Payne in Running Research Junkie

Sometimes academics do overthink things. I call it limping... Read more »

  • December 28, 2016
  • 04:30 AM
  • 266 views

Ocular Injuries May Not Be the Most Common, But Are They Easily Preventable?

by Kyle Harris in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Sport-related ocular injuries are most commonly open wounds to the eye or surrounding visual structures. Advocating for, or implementing rule changes to require protective eyewear could greatly mitigate this risk.... Read more »

Haring RS, Sheffield ID, Canner JK, & Schneider EB. (2016) Epidemiology of Sports-Related Eye Injuries in the United States. JAMA ophthalmology, 134(12), 1382-1390. PMID: 27812702  

  • December 27, 2016
  • 02:04 PM
  • 406 views

Why we have not met Aliens yet?

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

A huge of number of people keeps on thinking about the existence of some other intelligent beings in the universe but still we have not met any aliens. Why?

Earth is rare

Earth is special planet

One of the reasons that we have not met aliens is that Earth is rare and there is nothing just like Earth in the universe. In this regard, Paleontologist Peter Ward and astronomer Donald Brownlee presented the Rare Earth Hypothesis about 17 years ago.

According to the Rare Earth Hypothesis, t........ Read more »

Heller, R., & Armstrong, J. (2014) Superhabitable Worlds. Astrobiology, 14(1), 50-66. DOI: 10.1089/ast.2013.1088  

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