Post List

  • August 17, 2016
  • 03:17 PM
  • 225 views

How do researchers and journalists in Brazil relate to each other?

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

Scientists admit that dealing with complex issues related to their research with journalists is not an easy task. However, long they realized that communicate their results in scientific journals is not enough. To obtain research grants, attract collaboration opportunities and for career advancement, it is necessary - and advisable - to communicate with the public through journalists. Read about the details of this relationship and what can be done to improve it. … Read More →... Read more »

Peters, H., Brossard, D., de Cheveigne, S., Dunwoody, S., Kallfass, M., Miller, S., & Tsuchida, S. (2008) SCIENCE COMMUNICATION: Interactions with the Mass Media. Science, 321(5886), 204-205. DOI: 10.1126/science.1157780  

  • August 17, 2016
  • 02:20 PM
  • 254 views

Can cell phones make you feel less connected to your friends and family?

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

In this digital age, with phones at our fingertips, you would think that access to constant communication would make us feel closer to one another. But a new study shows that may not be the case. In fact, cell phone use might actually lead to feeling less socially connected, depending on your gender or cell phone habits.

... Read more »

  • August 17, 2016
  • 01:30 PM
  • 264 views

The PROCAMIO Trial – IV Procainamide vs IV Amiodarone for the Acute Treatment of Stable Wide Complex Tachycardia

by Rogue Medic in Rogue Medic

This is a very interesting trial that may surprise the many outspoken amiodarone advocates, but it should not surprise anyone who pays attention to research.

ALPS showed that we should stop giving amiodarone for unwitnessed shockable cardiac arrest. The lead researcher is still trying to spin amiodarone for witnessed shockable cardiac arrest, even though the results do not show improvement in the one outcome that matters – leaving the hospital with a brain that still works.[1],[2],[3]... Read more »

Kudenchuk PJ, Brown SP, Daya M, Rea T, Nichol G, Morrison LJ, Leroux B, Vaillancourt C, Wittwer L, Callaway CW.... (2016) Amiodarone, Lidocaine, or Placebo in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest. The New England journal of medicine, 374(18), 1711-22. PMID: 27043165  

Marill KA, deSouza IS, Nishijima DK, Senecal EL, Setnik GS, Stair TO, Ruskin JN, & Ellinor PT. (2010) Amiodarone or procainamide for the termination of sustained stable ventricular tachycardia: an historical multicenter comparison. Academic emergency medicine : official journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine, 17(3), 297-306. PMID: 20370763  

Marill KA, deSouza IS, Nishijima DK, Stair TO, Setnik GS, & Ruskin JN. (2006) Amiodarone is poorly effective for the acute termination of ventricular tachycardia. Annals of emergency medicine, 47(3), 217-24. PMID: 16492484  

Kułakowski P, Karczmarewicz S, Karpiński G, Soszyńska M, & Ceremuzyński L. (2000) Effects of intravenous amiodarone on ventricular refractoriness, intraventricular conduction, and ventricular tachycardia induction. Europace : European pacing, arrhythmias, and cardiac electrophysiology : journal of the working groups on cardiac pacing, arrhythmias, and cardiac cellular electrophysiology of the European Society of Cardiology, 2(3), 207-15. PMID: 11227590  

Bonny A, De Sisti A, Márquez MF, Megbemado R, Hidden-Lucet F, & Fontaine G. (2012) Low doses of intravenous epinephrine for refractory sustained monomorphic ventricular tachycardia. World journal of cardiology, 4(10), 296-301. PMID: 23110246  

Kowey PR. (1988) The calamity of cardioversion of conscious patients. The American journal of cardiology, 61(13), 1106-7. PMID: 3364364  

  • August 17, 2016
  • 11:45 AM
  • 241 views

Multiplicative versus additive fitness and the limit of weak selection

by Artem Kaznatcheev in Evolutionary Games Group

Previously, I have discussed the importance of understanding how fitness is defined in a given model. So far, I’ve focused on how mathematically equivalent formulations can have different ontological commitments. In this post, I want to touch briefly on another concern: two different types of mathematical definitions of fitness. In particular, I will discuss additive […]... Read more »

Wu B, García J, Hauert C, & Traulsen A. (2013) Extrapolating weak selection in evolutionary games. PLoS Computational Biology, 9(12). PMID: 24339769  

  • August 17, 2016
  • 11:45 AM
  • 215 views

In Dog Training, Balance Is Off

by CAPB in Companion Animal Psychology Blog

It’s not a good thing when dog trainers describe themselves as ‘balanced’. Here’s why.When you think about balancing dogs, your first thoughts might be of a dog walking along a beam, all nicely balanced and not falling off. Or maybe of a dog posing for a photo with a pile of cookies balanced on their muzzle, to show off how good their balancing skills are.But, unfortunately, this is not what people mean when they refer to ‘balanced’ dog training.Balance is one of those weasel words i........ Read more »

  • August 17, 2016
  • 11:02 AM
  • 229 views

Goblin Shark Gives a Lesson in Dismantling Your Face to Eat

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish



The goblin shark is a weird deep-sea creature first discovered off the coast of Japan in 1898. It has a ghoulish appearance, thanks to jaws that can stretch well away from the rest of its head. Scientists have assumed the goblin shark uses this trick to eat—but until recently, no one had actually watched one catching prey in the wild.

In 2008 and 2011, divers working with the Japanese television broadcaster NHK managed to capture two goblin sharks (Mitsukurina owstoni). Before rerele........ Read more »

Nakaya, K., Tomita, T., Suda, K., Sato, K., Ogimoto, K., Chappell, A., Sato, T., Takano, K., & Yuki, Y. (2016) Slingshot feeding of the goblin shark Mitsukurina owstoni (Pisces: Lamniformes: Mitsukurinidae). Scientific Reports, 27786. DOI: 10.1038/srep27786  

  • August 17, 2016
  • 07:02 AM
  • 235 views

Slow motion videos and juror perception of time for  intentional acts

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

New research tells us you may not want to have slow motion videos played at trial if you are the defense attorney. However, if you are the prosecutor—push hard for that video! It’s really a simple lesson: when jurors see slowed down footage of an event, they are more likely to think the person on […]

Related posts:
Do you want to make your juror “think fast”?
“Aggression genes”, Asperger’s and Absolution (for criminal acts)
Trustworthiness, real adulthood, cat videos and h........ Read more »

Caruso, E., Burns, Z., & Converse, B. (2016) Slow motion increases perceived intent. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 201603865. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1603865113  

  • August 17, 2016
  • 05:01 AM
  • 202 views

76% of youths with autism meet ADHD diagnostic criteria? No, more like 59%

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"In a population of children diagnosed with ASD [autism spectrum disorder], the rate of ADHD [attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder] + ASD was 42% and the rate of ADHD + ASD + ID [intellectual disability] was 17%, resulting in a 59% total comorbidity rate of ADHD and ASD."That was one of the important findings reported by Tara Stevens and colleagues [1] who using data from the Survey of Pathways to Diagnosis and Services (Pathways), a US initiative that has previ........ Read more »

  • August 17, 2016
  • 04:30 AM
  • 216 views

Integrating Injury Prevention in Schools!

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

An injury prevention warm-up two to three times a week in a junior high school physical education class decreased injuries and improved overall fitness.... Read more »

  • August 16, 2016
  • 05:01 PM
  • 230 views

A dog's dilemma: Do canines prefer praise or food?

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

A new study suggests that given the choice, many dogs prefer praise from their owners over food. The study is one of the first to combine brain-imaging data with behavioral experiments to explore canine reward preferences.

... Read more »

Cook, P., Prichard, A., Spivak, M., & Berns, G. (2016) Awake Canine fMRI Predicts Dogs’ Preference for Praise Versus Food. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience. DOI: 10.1093/scan/nsw102  

  • August 16, 2016
  • 01:57 PM
  • 208 views

Science Without Open Data Isn't Science

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

A new position paper published in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) has generated a lot of controversy among some scientists: Toward Fairness in Data Sharing.

It's not hard to see why: the piece criticizes the concept of data sharing in the context of clinical trials. Data sharing is the much-discussed idea that researchers should make their raw data available to anyone who wants to access it. While the NEJM piece is specifically framed as a rebuttal to this recent pro-data sharing N... Read more »

International Consortium of Investigators for Fairness in Trial Data Sharing. (2016) Toward Fairness in Data Sharing. The New England journal of medicine, 375(5), 405-7. PMID: 27518658  

  • August 16, 2016
  • 10:43 AM
  • 176 views

The Angry Silence

by AG McCluskey in Zongo's Cancer Diaries

The experience of cancer patients has changed in many ways over the last 30 years. One massive improvement is that patients can talk about their diseases more freely.

And this may not just make them feel better, it might help to make them better too.......... Read more »

MacMillan Cancer Support. (2016) Cancer: Then and Now. Diagnosis, treatment and aftercare from 1970–2016. MacMillan Cancer Support. info:/

  • August 16, 2016
  • 09:04 AM
  • 61 views

Decameter U-burst Harmonic Pair from a High Loop by Dorovskyy, Melnik, Konovalenko, Bubnov , Gridin, Shevchuk, Rucker, Poedts and Panchenko

by CESRA in Solar Radio Science

We discuss the results of recent observations of a solar U-burst harmonic pair in the frequency range 10-70 MHz, performed by the radio telescope UTR-2 ...... Read more »

Dorovskyy et al. (2016) Decameter U-burst Harmonic Pair from a High Loop by Dorovskyy et al. Solar Physics. info:/

  • August 16, 2016
  • 04:36 AM
  • 218 views

Group A Streptococcal infections and paediatric neuropsychiatric disorders: Taiwan style

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

There they go again. Taiwan and their 'big data' publishing, yet again, some rather interesting population-based research trends derived from data from the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD).This time around it is the paper by Han-Cheng Wang and colleagues [1] and the hypothesis to evaluate the "association between group A streptococcal (GAS) infections and the risks of developing tic disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disord........ Read more »

  • August 15, 2016
  • 02:44 PM
  • 290 views

Prostitution has gone online -- and pimps are thriving

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

With the sale of sex shifting online, today's pimps are avoiding police detection by using underground websites, social media, mobile apps and even by hiding their ads on mainstream sites such as Craigslist and Backpage. In a first-of-its-kind study, criminologists interviewed 71 pimps in Atlanta and Chicago to determine how their marketing decisions are influenced by police enforcement of online prostitution.

... Read more »

  • August 15, 2016
  • 04:09 AM
  • 226 views

Offending behaviour and ADHD

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"Although some associations between ADHD [attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder] and offending may be accounted for by co-morbidity with substance use disorders, early onset of offending and repeated violent offending appear to be directly related to ADHD."That was the conclusion reached by Jan Román-Ithier and colleagues [1] reporting on their study designed to "examine correlates of childhood ADHD symptoms among prisoners." Based on a sample adult prison population (N=1179) where........ Read more »

  • August 14, 2016
  • 05:40 PM
  • 234 views

Exercise can tackle symptoms of schizophrenia

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Aerobic exercise can significantly help people coping with the long-term mental health condition schizophrenia, according to a new study. Through combining data from 10 independent clinical trials with a total of 385 patients with schizophrenia, Joseph Firth found that around 12 weeks of aerobic exercise training can significant improve patients' brain functioning.

... Read more »

  • August 13, 2016
  • 02:43 PM
  • 288 views

Intestinal flora effects drug response

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Intestinal flora has multiple influences on human health, but researchers have revealed that it is also likely to have an effect on the body's response to drugs. Recent research suggests that changes in the intestinal flora, caused by antibacterial and antibiotic drugs or individual differences between people, may have an effect on a person's response to drugs including side effects. The research focused on the changes in proteins due to the condition of intestinal flora that affect th........ Read more »

  • August 13, 2016
  • 03:26 AM
  • 314 views

Inflammation is part of Gulf War Syndrome

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Although mostly trying to avoid any politics-talk on this blog I am going to make some reference to it in this post set in the context of the Persian Gulf War otherwise known at the First Iraq War.The recent publication of the Chilcot report describing the case for the UK's involvement in the 2003 Iraq War (the second Iraq War) has further lit up an already illuminating year in British politics, by perhaps adding fuel to the notion that 'finishing the job' might have been an ........ Read more »

Johnson GJ, Slater BC, Leis LA, Rector TS, & Bach RR. (2016) Blood Biomarkers of Chronic Inflammation in Gulf War Illness. PloS one, 11(6). PMID: 27352030  

  • August 12, 2016
  • 03:37 PM
  • 328 views

Sugar addiction: Discovery of a brain sugar switch

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Researchers have discovered that our brain actively takes sugar from the blood. Prior to this, researchers around the world had assumed that this was a purely passive process. An international team reports that transportation of sugar into the brain is regulated by so-called glial cells that react to hormones such as insulin or leptin; previously it was thought that this was only possible for neurons.

... Read more »

García-Cáceres, C., Quarta, C., Varela, L., Gao, Y., Gruber, T., Legutko, B., Jastroch, M., Johansson, P., Ninkovic, J., Yi, C.... (2016) Astrocytic Insulin Signaling Couples Brain Glucose Uptake with Nutrient Availability. Cell, 166(4), 867-880. DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2016.07.028  

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