Post List

  • June 29, 2015
  • 08:00 AM
  • 55 views

Stand and Deliver: We Think Better on Our Feet — Literally

by Jeremiah Stanghini in Jeremiah Stanghini

Did you see the post from ScienceDaily a couple of months ago? As it turns out, we think better when we’re on our feet. Maybe more importantly though, given how much we tend to sit throughout the day, standing is a good way to … Continue reading →... Read more »

Dornhecker, M., Blake, J., Benden, M., Zhao, H., & Wendel, M. (2015) The effect of stand-biased desks on academic engagement: an exploratory study. International Journal of Health Promotion and Education, 1-10. DOI: 10.1080/14635240.2015.1029641  

  • June 29, 2015
  • 06:49 AM
  • 40 views

Cancer Breakthrough: New Devise Optomizes Lymphoma Treatment

by Agnese Mariotti in United Academics

CIVO tests cancer drugs in human lymphomas in only 72 hours.... Read more »

Klinghoffer, R., Bahrami, S., Hatton, B., Frazier, J., Moreno-Gonzalez, A., Strand, A., Kerwin, W., Casalini, J., Thirstrup, D., You, S.... (2015) A technology platform to assess multiple cancer agents simultaneously within a patient's tumor. Science Translational Medicine, 7(284), 284-284. DOI: 10.1126/scitranslmed.aaa7489  

  • June 29, 2015
  • 04:57 AM
  • 57 views

Fermented foods and social anxiety?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Stumbling across a headline that reads: 'Study Finds Decreased Social Anxiety Among Young Adults Who Eat Fermented Foods' was bound to pique my blogging interest. When I eventually tracked down the source paper behind the headline I became more and more intrigued as today I bring to your attention the study findings reported by Matthew Hilimire and colleagues [1].Implementing "a cross-sectional approach to determine whether consumption of fermented foods likely to contain probiotics interac........ Read more »

Hilimire MR, DeVylder JE, & Forestell CA. (2015) Fermented foods, neuroticism, and social anxiety: An interaction model. Psychiatry research, 228(2), 203-8. PMID: 25998000  

  • June 28, 2015
  • 03:10 PM
  • 45 views

Blood & Fog: The Military's Germ Warfare Tests in San Francisco

by Rebecca Kreston in BODY HORRORS

The Nuremberg Code was drafted in 1947 following the appalling revelations of human experimentation committed in Nazi concentration camps. The overarching goal of the Code was to establish a set of rules for the ethical conduct of research using human subjects, guaranteeing that the rights and welfare of such participants would be protected. Two important principles guide and define this Code: the concept of voluntary, informed consent and that no experiment shall be conducted in which "there i........ Read more »

WHEAT RP, ZUCKERMAN A, & RANTZ LA. (1951) Infection due to chromobacteria; report of 11 cases. A.M.A. archives of internal medicine, 88(4), 461-6. PMID: 14867953  

  • June 28, 2015
  • 01:34 PM
  • 54 views

Pharma Make The Most of A Negative Result

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

A misleading piece of statistical rhetoric has appeared in a paper about an experimental antidepressant treatment. The study is published in the Journal of Affective Disorders. JAD is a respectable mid-ranked psychiatry journal - yet on this occasion they seem to have dropped the ball badly.



The study examined whether the drug armodafinil (Nuvigil) improved mood in people with bipolar disorder who were in a depressive episode. In a double-blind trial, 462 patients were randomized to treat... Read more »

  • June 28, 2015
  • 12:58 PM
  • 58 views

Rare neurons enable mental flexibility

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Behavioral flexibility — the ability to change strategy when the rules change — is controlled by specific neurons in the brain, Researchers have confirmed. Cholinergic interneurons are rare — they make up just one to two percent of the neurons in the striatum, a key part of the brain involved with higher-level decision-making. Scientists have suspected they play a role in changing strategies, and researchers at OIST recently confirmed this with experiments.... Read more »

Aoki, S., Liu, A., Zucca, A., Zucca, S., & Wickens, J. (2015) Role of Striatal Cholinergic Interneurons in Set-Shifting in the Rat. Journal of Neuroscience, 35(25), 9424-9431. DOI: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0490-15.2015  

  • June 28, 2015
  • 10:11 AM
  • 38 views

Cellular Senescence in Regeneration

by Max_Yun in the Node

Salamanders are remarkable organisms. Following the amputation or loss of complex structures such as parts of their eyes, hearts and brains, tails -including the spinal cord-, jaws and even full limbs, they are able to set up a regeneration programme which leads to the exact replacement of the missing structure, even as adults. As such, […]... Read more »

Eguchi, G., Eguchi, Y., Nakamura, K., Yadav, M., Millán, J., & Tsonis, P. (2011) Regenerative capacity in newts is not altered by repeated regeneration and ageing. Nature Communications, 384. DOI: 10.1038/ncomms1389  

van Deursen, J. (2014) The role of senescent cells in ageing. Nature, 509(7501), 439-446. DOI: 10.1038/nature13193  

Sousa-Victor, P., Gutarra, S., García-Prat, L., Rodriguez-Ubreva, J., Ortet, L., Ruiz-Bonilla, V., Jardí, M., Ballestar, E., González, S., Serrano, A.... (2014) Geriatric muscle stem cells switch reversible quiescence into senescence. Nature, 506(7488), 316-321. DOI: 10.1038/nature13013  

Yun, M., Gates, P., & Brockes, J. (2013) Regulation of p53 is critical for vertebrate limb regeneration. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 110(43), 17392-17397. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1310519110  

Muñoz-Espín D, Cañamero M, Maraver A, Gómez-López G, Contreras J, Murillo-Cuesta S, Rodríguez-Baeza A, Varela-Nieto I, Ruberte J, Collado M.... (2013) Programmed cell senescence during mammalian embryonic development. Cell, 155(5), 1104-1118. PMID: 24238962  

Storer, M., Mas, A., Robert-Moreno, A., Pecoraro, M., Ortells, M., Di Giacomo, V., Yosef, R., Pilpel, N., Krizhanovsky, V., Sharpe, J.... (2013) Senescence Is a Developmental Mechanism that Contributes to Embryonic Growth and Patterning. Cell, 155(5), 1119-1130. DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2013.10.041  

Demaria, M., Ohtani, N., Youssef, S., Rodier, F., Toussaint, W., Mitchell, J., Laberge, R., Vijg, J., Van Steeg, H., Dollé, M.... (2014) An Essential Role for Senescent Cells in Optimal Wound Healing through Secretion of PDGF-AA. Developmental Cell, 31(6), 722-733. DOI: 10.1016/j.devcel.2014.11.012  

  • June 28, 2015
  • 03:33 AM
  • 87 views

What personality features do heroes and psychopaths have in common?

by Scott McGreal in Eye on Psych

The search for a positive face of psychopathy prompted a study examining whether psychopaths and heroes share certain personality traits. Both psychopathy and heroism were correlated with a history of antisocial behavior, but the reasons for this remain unclear. Heroes might have more mature personalities than psychopaths, in spite of what features they may have in common. ... Read more »

  • June 28, 2015
  • 03:05 AM
  • 49 views

Who Will Pay for All the New DBS Implants?

by The Neurocritic in The Neurocritic

Recently, Science and Nature had news features on big BRAIN funding for the development of deep brain stimulation technologies. The ultimate aim of this research is to treat and correct malfunctioning neural circuits in psychiatric and neurological disorders. Both pieces raised ethical issues, focused on device manufacturers and potential military applications, respectively.A different ethical concern, not mentioned in either article, is who will have access to these new devices, and who is goin........ Read more »

  • June 27, 2015
  • 07:26 PM
  • 55 views

Brain scan can predict who responds best to certain treatment for OCD

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Tens of millions of Americans — an estimated 1 to 2 percent of the population — will suffer at some point in their lifetimes from obsessive-compulsive disorder, a disorder characterized by recurrent, intrusive, and disturbing thoughts (obsessions), and/or stereotyped recurrent behaviors (compulsions). Left untreated, OCD can be profoundly distressing to the patient and can adversely affect their ability to succeed in school, hold a job or function in society.... Read more »

  • June 27, 2015
  • 02:17 PM
  • 64 views

Natural wilderness areas need buffer zones to protect from human development

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Despite heavy development, the U.S. still has millions of acres of pristine wild lands. Coveted for their beauty, these wilderness areas draw innumerable outdoor enthusiasts eager for a taste of primitive nature. But University of Georgia researchers say these federally protected nature areas have a problem: Their boundaries have become prime real estate.... Read more »

Lauren K. Ward, & Gary T. Green. (2015) Wilderness Zoning: Applying an Adapted Biosphere Reserve Model to Wilderness Areas. Illuminare. info:/http://scholarworks.iu.edu/journals/index.php/illuminare/article/view/13341

  • June 27, 2015
  • 08:18 AM
  • 59 views

Probiotics, schizophrenia and inflammation

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I have to say that I was initially pretty interested to read the paper by Jakub Tomasik and colleagues [1] (open-access available here) discussing results examining the "possible immunomodulatory effects of probiotic supplementation in chronic schizophrenia patients."Interested because not only was this a partnership paper including Robert Yolken and Faith Dickerson on the authorship list (names who have appeared a few times on this blog) but also because of the subject matter extending som........ Read more »

  • June 27, 2015
  • 06:38 AM
  • 22 views

Friendly hello and a bit about stress & adult hippocampal neurogenesis

by cathlau in the Node

This is my first post for the Node, so I thought I would introduce myself a little bit… I just finished my MSc in Experimental Psychology (Behavioural Neuroscience) and now I am striving towards becoming a science communicator. Although, I would like to share the research that I am interested in and was involved in, […]... Read more »

Cohen, H., Zohar, J., Gidron, Y., Matar, M., Belkind, D., Loewenthal, U., Kozlovsky, N., & Kaplan, Z. (2006) Blunted HPA Axis Response to Stress Influences Susceptibility to Posttraumatic Stress Response in Rats. Biological Psychiatry, 59(12), 1208-1218. DOI: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2005.12.003  

Hanson, N., Owens, M., Boss-Williams, K., Weiss, J., & Nemeroff, C. (2011) Several stressors fail to reduce adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 36(10), 1520-1529. DOI: 10.1016/j.psyneuen.2011.04.006  

Schoenfeld, T., & Gould, E. (2012) Stress, stress hormones, and adult neurogenesis. Experimental Neurology, 233(1), 12-21. DOI: 10.1016/j.expneurol.2011.01.008  

  • June 26, 2015
  • 05:50 PM
  • 74 views

A single mutation helped last year’s flu virus gain an advantage over the vaccine

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

The 2014-2015 flu vaccine didn’t work as well compared to previous years because the H3N2 virus recently acquired a mutation that concealed the infection from the immune system. A new study reveals the major viral mutation responsible for the mismatch between the vaccine strain and circulating strains. The research will help guide the selection of viral strains for future seasonal flu vaccines.... Read more »

  • June 26, 2015
  • 02:27 PM
  • 56 views

Gut Microbiome May Drive Colon Cancer

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Michael B. Burns, Ph.D. HHMI Post-Doctoral Fellow Dept. of Genetics, Cell Biology and Development Dept. of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior Masonic Cancer Center Dept. of Biology Teaching and Learning University of Minnesota, Twin Cities St. Paul, MN … Continue reading →
The post Gut Microbiome May Drive Colon Cancer appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

Michael B. Burns, Ph.D.HHMI Post-Doctoral Fellow, & Dept. of Genetics, Cell Biology and Development. (2015) Gut Microbiome May Drive Colon Cancer. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • June 26, 2015
  • 02:05 PM
  • 52 views

Drug Nanocarrier Helps Overcome Medication Resistance

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Jose A. Garcia Salcedo, PhD. Unidad de Enfermedades Infecciosas Hospital Universitario San Cecilio Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria de Granada Granada Spain Medical Research: What is the background for this study? Response: Drug resistance is complicating the treatment … Continue reading →
The post Drug Nanocarrier Helps Overcome Medication Resistance appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

Jose A. Garcia Salcedo, PhD., Unidad de Enfermedades Infecciosas, & Hospital Universitario San Cecilio. (2015) Drug Nanocarrier Helps Overcome Medication Resistance. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • June 26, 2015
  • 01:55 PM
  • 51 views

JAK Inhibitors Offer Hope For Vitiligo

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Brett King, M.D., Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Dermatology Yale University School of Medicine Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. King: Treatment options for vitiligo are limited and often … Continue reading →
The post JAK Inhibitors Offer Hope For Vitiligo appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

Brett King, M.D., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Dermatology, & Yale University School of Medicine. (2015) JAK Inhibitors Offer Hope For Vitiligo. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • June 26, 2015
  • 12:44 PM
  • 52 views

Electromagnetic Interference Between Smart Phones and Cardiac Devices Rare But Possible

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Carsten Lennerz Deutsches Herzzentrum München Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: The number of cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) is increasing. Worldwide more than 4 million people … Continue reading →
The post Electromagnetic Interference Between Smart Phones and Cardiac Devices Rare But Possible appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews an........ Read more »

Dr. Carsten Lennerz, Deutsches Herzzentrum, & München. (2015) Electromagnetic Interference Between Smart Phones and Cardiac Devices Rare But Possible. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • June 26, 2015
  • 12:33 PM
  • 57 views

Nervous Sea Squirts Squirt Out Their Stomachs and Grow New Ones

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish



We may call someone gutless who's acting afraid. But certain coral-reef dwellers take gutless to a whole other level: they shoot their digestive tracts out of their bodies when they feel threatened. This seems to deter nearby fish from taking a bite. Even more amazing, though, is how quickly the gutless animals grow back their organs.

Polycarpa mytiligera is a little tube-shaped creature called an ascidian, or sea squirt. It resides in tropical waters of the Indian and Pacific oceans. Wit... Read more »

  • June 26, 2015
  • 12:06 PM
  • 62 views

Study finds pet owners reluctant to face up to their cats’ kill count

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Cats are increasingly earning themselves a reputation as wildlife killers with estimates of animals killed every year by domestic cats in the UK numbering into the millions. This new study on the attitudes of cat owners suggests that proposals to keep cats indoors in order to preserve wildlife would not be well received.... Read more »

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