Post List

  • October 18, 2014
  • 09:34 AM
  • 66 views

Merit’s Liquidity

by nooffensebut in The Unsilenced Science

The latest SAT and ACT data suggest that America’s cognitive elite have been enjoying new geographic mobility, but difficult economic times push them out of the elite strata, contrary to a prediction of The Bell Curve by Richard Herrnstein and Charles Murray.... Read more »

nooffensebut. (2014) Parents’ Income is a Poor Predictor of SAT Score. Open Differential Psychology, 1-19. info:other/

  • October 18, 2014
  • 05:30 AM
  • 54 views

More epigenetics, EN-2 and autism... the plot thickens

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I don't mind admitting that I was to some extent 'winging it' with my previous post on epigenetics and Engrailed-2 (EN-2) as a consequence of the findings reported by Jill James and colleagues [1] with autism in mind. Although an avid follower of the science of epigenetics when (cautiously) applied to autism, I am by no means any authority on the subject matter particularly when it comes to the nitty-gritty details. You can probably therefore expect similar things in my latest discussi........ Read more »

  • October 18, 2014
  • 01:42 AM
  • 25 views

Full-term developmet of quail chick by ICSI

by Mizushima S in the Node

The eggs of domestic birds have been used in the study of developmental biology, leading to the extensive accumulation of knowledge on embryonic development. However, the early events involved in bird development, particularly the mechanism underlying fertilization, have not been elucidated in as much detail as those of other species of animals. The ooplasm in […]... Read more »

Mizushima, S., Hiyama, G., Shiba, K., Inaba, K., Dohra, H., Ono, T., Shimada, K., & Sasanami, T. (2014) The birth of quail chicks after intracytoplasmic sperm injection. Development, 141(19), 3799-3806. DOI: 10.1242/dev.111765  

  • October 17, 2014
  • 10:29 PM
  • 51 views

Translational Findings: Fruit fly contributions to research in circadian rhythms

by Bethany Christmann in Fly on the Wall

What are circadian rhythms, and why are they important to humans? Over the past century, technological innovations have changed human society dramatically, undeniably for the better. But the advent of jet travel, round-the-clock manufacturing, and internet communication has also had a disruptive effect on our bodies’ circadian rhythms. The word “circadian” comes from the latin […]... Read more »

  • October 17, 2014
  • 04:02 PM
  • 54 views

A look at Air Pollution and Your Body

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

We have all probably seen stories from China on the horrid air pollution there. Accompanying those reports of course are the statistics for air pollution that deaths have caused. For the record, the World Health Organization estimated that ambient air pollution caused 3.7 million premature deaths (worldwide) in 2012 alone – yet what exactly happens to your body when it encounters pollutants?... Read more »

  • October 17, 2014
  • 11:40 AM
  • 50 views

October 17, 2014

by Erin Campbell in HighMag Blog

For years the prettiest cells to image were flat cells in a dish. Thanks to the tireless work of many, beautiful high-resolution images can now come from tissue in a living organism. Today’s image is from a paper showing improved techniques for imaging fine cellular processes within large volumes, from the lab of recent Nobel prize winner, Eric Betzig. A material’s refractive index refers to how light travels through it; the simplest example being how light bends when passed through wat........ Read more »

Wang, K., Milkie, D., Saxena, A., Engerer, P., Misgeld, T., Bronner, M., Mumm, J., & Betzig, E. (2014) Rapid adaptive optical recovery of optimal resolution over large volumes. Nature Methods, 11(6), 625-628. DOI: 10.1038/nmeth.2925  

  • October 17, 2014
  • 08:55 AM
  • 57 views

People Are More Swayed by Things That Look Sciencey

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish

Anyone who’s paged through a women’s magazine will recognize this strategy: to make a product seem better, surround it with a scientific glow. “Clinical trials show lashes grow up to 400% fuller!” “27% reduction of dark spots in 10 weeks!” “Ceramides!” Does this actually help convince people to hand over their cash? A study using […]The post People Are More Swayed by Things That Look Sciencey appeared first on Inkfish.... Read more »

  • October 17, 2014
  • 06:50 AM
  • 50 views

The Friday Five for 10/17/2014

by Bill Sullivan in The 'Scope

Coolest science news stories of the week: stem cells to treat diabetes, fake testes, erasing memories, more!... Read more »

DeMartini DG, Ghoshal A, Pandolfi E, Weaver AT, Baum M, & Morse DE. (2013) Dynamic biophotonics: female squid exhibit sexually dimorphic tunable leucophores and iridocytes. The Journal of experimental biology, 216(Pt 19), 3733-41. PMID: 24006348  

Pagliuca, F., Millman, J., Gürtler, M., Segel, M., Van Dervort, A., Ryu, J., Peterson, Q., Greiner, D., & Melton, D. (2014) Generation of Functional Human Pancreatic β Cells In Vitro. Cell, 159(2), 428-439. DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2014.09.040  

  • October 17, 2014
  • 06:13 AM
  • 86 views

Large Sized Men Disadvantaged In Relationships

by Rangina Barakzai in United Academics

For decades men have been diffident and self-doubting about the size of their phallus. Well, luckily for the holders of the pocket rocket, there is a twist.... Read more »

  • October 17, 2014
  • 05:22 AM
  • 60 views

Altered ghrelin levels in boys with autism

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"Honey, it's the '90s, remember?"Saudi Arabia and autism research? It must be at least one author from the research tag-team that is Mostafa and Al-Ayadhi.Indeed, in today's post it is Laila Al-Ayadhi featured on the paper by Felwah S. Al-Zaid and colleagues [1] (open-access) who concluded on: "a potential role for the hormone ghrelin in the pathogenesis of autism".Ghrelin, by the way, is often called the 'hunger hormone' as a result of its effects in relation to energy homoeostasis. A........ Read more »

  • October 17, 2014
  • 03:00 AM
  • 55 views

BHD lung cysts are not degenerative, but may cause pneumothorax

by Lizzie Perdeaux in BHD Research Blog

Although 90% of BHD patients develop lung cysts, there is very little information about the natural history of BHD lung cysts. In order to determine how lung cysts change over time, Johannesma et al. (2014a) compared the results of two … Continue reading →... Read more »

Johannesma PC, Houweling AC, van Waesberghe JH, van Moorselaar RJ, Starink TM, Menko FH, & Postmus PE. (2014) The pathogenesis of pneumothorax in Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome: A hypothesis. Respirology (Carlton, Vic.), 19(8), 1248-50. PMID: 25302759  

  • October 16, 2014
  • 05:20 PM
  • 78 views

The “New” Roots of our Friends the Mitochondria

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Mitochondria, the proverbial “powerhouse” of the cell. Mitochondria are found in virtually all eukaryotic cells, plant or animal and we thought that was pretty much the end of the story. It wasn’t a great explanation but it was Now new research is turning the idea– that our ancestor cells simply “swallowed up” bacterial cells that eventually became mitochondria– on its head.... Read more »

Zhang Wang, & Martin Wu. (2014) Phylogenomic Reconstruction Indicates Mitochondrial Ancestor Was an Energy Parasite . PLoS ONE. info:/10.1371/journal.pone.0110685

  • October 16, 2014
  • 04:18 PM
  • 98 views

Inherited Memories: Too Good To Be True?

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

In December last year, researchers Brian Dias and Kerry Ressler made a splash with a paper seeming to show that memories can be inherited. This article, published in Nature Neuroscience, reported that if adult mice are taught to be afraid of a particular smell, then their children will also fear it. Which is pretty wild. […]The post Inherited Memories: Too Good To Be True? appeared first on Neuroskeptic.... Read more »

  • October 16, 2014
  • 02:19 PM
  • 71 views

Is Axon Guidance by Attraction and Repulsion, or by a Roll of the Dice?

by Wadsworth in Wadsworth Guidance

Attractants and repellants guide axons to their targets.  On its journey, a migrating axon may be confronted with multiple attractive and repulsive guidance cues.  This presents a conundrum. How does the axon avoid a tug-of-war between attractants and repellants?  Does the strongest cue win?  Can one cue negate the effects of another?  Can an axon switch its responsiveness to cues until they all match?   0 0 1 83 474 Robert Wood Johnson Medical School ........ Read more »

Tang, X., & Wadsworth, W. (2014) SAX-3 (Robo) and UNC-40 (DCC) Regulate a Directional Bias for Axon Guidance in Response to Multiple Extracellular Cues. PLoS ONE, 9(10). info:/10.1371/journal.pone.0110031

  • October 16, 2014
  • 01:11 PM
  • 67 views

Deceased & Living Liver Transplant Comparable For Hepatorenal Syndrome

by Cristy at Living Donor 101 in Living Donors Are People Too

30 patients with HRS receiving a live donor liver transplantation (LDLT) and 90 HRS patients (Hepatorenal Syndrome) receiving a full graft deceased donor liver transplantation (DDLT) were compared. No difference was detected between LDLT and DDLT patients regarding graft survival at 1 (80% vs. 82%), at 3 (69% vs. 76%) and 5 years (65% vs. 76%) …
Continue reading »
The post Deceased & Living Liver Transplant Comparable For Hepatorenal Syndrome appeared first on Living Donors Are........ Read more »

  • October 16, 2014
  • 09:40 AM
  • 75 views

Blood. It’s What’s For Dinner.

by Bill Sullivan in The 'Scope

The practice of feeding on blood, known as hematophagy, is actually a lot more common than you might realize.... Read more »

  • October 16, 2014
  • 07:40 AM
  • 67 views

Linking RAGE in Lung Transplants To Traumatic Brain Injury

by Rebekah Morrow in United Academics

Lung transplants are the least successful type of organ transplant. Now a group of scientists in Indiana has identified a possible cause of organ failure in lung transplants.... Read more »

Whitson BA, & Hayes D Jr. (2014) Indications and outcomes in adult lung transplantation. Journal of thoracic disease, 6(8), 1018-23. PMID: 25132968  

  • October 16, 2014
  • 04:59 AM
  • 70 views

MicroRNAs and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"No one User wrote me! I'm worth millions of their man-years!"Not so long ago I posted an entry talking about microRNAs and autism (see here). As well as including some rather interesting, if preliminary findings, that particular piece of work also served to introduce yet another layer of complexity to our genome and its expression: microRNAs.I was therefore always going to be more than a little intrigued by the results published by Ekua Brenu and colleagues [1] and their observations on ci........ Read more »

  • October 16, 2014
  • 02:18 AM
  • 64 views

World Food Day - Food Security through the Lens of Nutrition

by Wiley Asia Blog in Wiley Asia Blog - Life Sciences

The Foresight report has described an unprecedented confluence of pressures whereby a growing, and in some cases, increasingly prosperous global population, alongside increasing demand for limited resources and the pressing need to address environmental challenges, including climate change and changing weather patterns, means that food security is seriously and increasingly threatened. Much of the discussion has focused on greenhouse gas emissions associated with food production and the contribu........ Read more »

Buttriss, J. (2013) Food security through the lens of nutrition. Nutrition Bulletin, 38(2), 254-261. DOI: 10.1111/nbu.12031  

  • October 16, 2014
  • 02:03 AM
  • 67 views

JUST PUBLISHED: Resilience and Responses to Persistent Pain

by Mark Rubin in The University of Newcastle's School of Psychology Newsline

The concept of resilience is of considerable interest in clinical practice.  The resilient person shows relatively speedy recovery from a disturbance and an ability to resume their former work practices, habits and normal life.  In addition, they are able to maintain that recovery over the long-term.The maintenance of recovery is of particular interest in patients suffering from chronic pain, since the presence of persistent pain leads to a raft of behavioural and cognitive changes all........ Read more »

Newton-John TR, Mason C, & Hunter M. (2014) The role of resilience in adjustment and coping with chronic pain. Rehabilitation psychology, 59(3), 360-5. PMID: 25019306  

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