Post List

  • November 6, 2014
  • 07:13 AM
  • 98 views

Countries with more gender equality score more Olympic medals - among women and men

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

There are huge benefits to be gained when women and men are given equal opportunities. For example, companies with at least one woman on their board are more successful. In countries with less stereotyped views about women's abilities, girls tend to perform better at science. Now a team led by Jennifer Berdahl has extended this line of research to the realm of sport. In countries with greater gender equality, they find, both women and men tend to perform better at the Olympics.The researchers lo........ Read more »

  • November 6, 2014
  • 04:30 AM
  • 84 views

Neurotensin, autism and tail-chasing Bull Terrriers?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I'm not kidding.The paper by Tsilioni and colleagues [1] (open-access) did indeed look at serum levels of neurotensin and corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) in a cohort of children diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) alongside levels in tail-chasing Bull Terrier dogs as compared to unaffected [non tail-chasing] Bull Terriers (BTs) and Labrador Retriever dogs. You may well smirk or even laugh at such research but, as per the recent [preliminary] broccoli chemical - autis........ Read more »

  • November 6, 2014
  • 04:25 AM
  • 117 views

Memory training boosts IQ

by Richard Kunert in Brain's Idea

Is the IQ set in stone once we hit adulthood? ‘Yes it is’ used to be the received wisdom. A new meta-analysis challenges this view and gives hope to all of us who feel that mother nature should have endowed us with more IQ points. But is the training worth it? Intelligence increases in adults […]... Read more »

  • November 6, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 69 views

Clinical Findings Triumph Baseline MRI Findings in Predicting Hamstring Re-injury Just After Return to Play

by Samantha Sisson, Grace Brooks in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Key predictors of hamstring re-injury are higher number of previous hamstring injuries, more degrees of active knee extension deficit, isometric knee flexion force deficit at 15°, and the presence of localized discomfort on posterior thigh palpation just after return to play (RTP).... Read more »

  • November 5, 2014
  • 04:08 PM
  • 87 views

A Big Break for Bio-Gasoline

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

While the world waits for a better battery (and a energy grid system that doesn't require constant power making), scientists are hard at work trying to teach old fuels a new trick. Thankfully an international team of bioengineers has boosted the ability of bacteria to produce isopentenol, a compound with desirable gasoline properties. The finding, if it is not obvious, is a significant step toward developing a bacterial strain that can yield industrial quantities of renewable bio-gasoline.... Read more »

  • November 5, 2014
  • 12:34 PM
  • 105 views

What is the most instantly recognisable song?

by Henkjan Honing in Music Matters

Everyone knows a hook when they hear one, but scientists don’t know why. By playing the Hooked on Music game you are exploring the science of songs and helping us to unlock what makes music catchy.

Last weekend the preliminary outcome of the online game was announced in Manchester, UK at the MOSI, answering the question: What is the most instantly recognisable song? Interestingly, numerous media started to report on this. A small media hype?... Read more »

J.A. Burgoyne, D. Bountouridis, J. van Balen, & H. Honing. (2013) Hooked: A Game for Discovering What Makes Music Catchy. Proceedings of the 14th International Society for Music Information Retrieval Conference , 245-250. info:/

  • November 5, 2014
  • 12:19 PM
  • 92 views

Anorexia Nervosa as a Disorder of Perception

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

A key feature in anorexia nervosa is the disturbance in perception of the body.This perceptual disturbance is encapsulated in criteria 3 from DSM-5: "Disturbance in the way in which one's body weight or shape is experienced, undue influence of body weight or shape evaluation, or denial of the seriousness of the current low weight" Santino Guadio from Italy and colleagues recently published a nice summary of the support for body image disturbance in anorexia nervosa. This study focused ........ Read more »

  • November 5, 2014
  • 12:04 PM
  • 81 views

Where do people look? Where there’s information

by neuroecology in Neuroecology

1. BusinessInsider has a great collection of pictures tracking where people actually look when they see an image. (Big takeaway: men love to look at other people’s groins.) 2. Watch the video above: people generally look at the face of the … Continue reading →... Read more »

Najemnik, J., & Geisler, W. (2005) Optimal eye movement strategies in visual search. Nature, 434(7031), 387-391. DOI: 10.1038/nature03390  

Gallup AC, Hale JJ, Sumpter DJ, Garnier S, Kacelnik A, Krebs JR, & Couzin ID. (2012) Visual attention and the acquisition of information in human crowds. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 109(19), 7245-50. PMID: 22529369  

Watson KK, & Platt ML. (2012) Social signals in primate orbitofrontal cortex. Current biology : CB, 22(23), 2268-73. PMID: 23122847  

  • November 5, 2014
  • 10:30 AM
  • 73 views

Neury Thursday: Sleep and the Blood Brain Barrier, with some hesitation

by Allison in Dormivigilia

Researchers found that the permeability of the blood brain barrier is compromised with chronic sleep deprivation. However, the methods section brings these findings into question. Scientists, do your job and make those methods detailed. ... Read more »

He, J., Hsuchou, H., He, Y., Kastin, A., Wang, Y., & Pan, W. (2014) Sleep Restriction Impairs Blood-Brain Barrier Function. Journal of Neuroscience, 34(44), 14697-14706. DOI: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2111-14.2014  

  • November 5, 2014
  • 09:47 AM
  • 80 views

Video Tip of the Week: Genome Browser in a Box

by Mary in OpenHelix

We’ve been doing UCSC Genome Browser training workshops for a decade now. We’ve seen all sorts of situations–from places that had terrific bioinformatics and IT support, to places where the attendees had no idea if anyone provided support at their institution. Ironically, sometimes the places with little support were big-name research places where all the […]... Read more »

Haeussler M., B. J. Raney, A. S. Hinrichs, H. Clawson, A. S. Zweig, D. Karolchik, J. Casper, M. L. Speir, D. Haussler, & W. J. Kent. (2014) Navigating protected genomics data with UCSC Genome Browser in a Box. Bioinformatics. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/bioinformatics/btu712  

  • November 5, 2014
  • 08:34 AM
  • 93 views

Changes in Society and Diet from the Merovingian to Viking Age

by Katy Meyers Emery in Bones Don't Lie

Vikings are a hot topic right now. While I would hope this would be due to their interesting maritime culture, fascinating burial practices or an increased understanding in the important role […]... Read more »

  • November 5, 2014
  • 08:30 AM
  • 93 views

How Many Dogs is Enough for Canine Science?

by CAPB in Companion Animal Psychology Blog

And does it matter which dogs they are?Photo: Julia Remezova / ShuterstockThe number of dogs that take part in each research study is variable. Often, the sample size is small, because of the difficulty of recruiting dogs and their owners. And while scientists know how many are needed for statistical analysis, there are other things to take into account too.For example, breed may or may not be relevant. If only ten dogs take part in a study and they are all Australian Shepherds, the result........ Read more »

Berns, G., Brooks, A., & Spivak, M. (2012) Functional MRI in Awake Unrestrained Dogs. SSRN Electronic Journal. DOI: 10.2139/ssrn.2047085  

Lofgren, S., Wiener, P., Blott, S., Sanchez-Molano, E., Woolliams, J., Clements, D., & Haskell, M. (2014) Management and personality in Labrador Retriever dogs. Applied Animal Behaviour Science, 44-53. DOI: 10.1016/j.applanim.2014.04.006  

Savvides, N. (2013) Living with dogs: Alternative animal practices in Bangkok, Thailand. Animal Studies Journal, 2(2), 28-50. info:/

Westgarth, C., Christley, R., Pinchbeck, G., Gaskell, R., Dawson, S., & Bradshaw, J. (2010) Dog behaviour on walks and the effect of use of the leash. Applied Animal Behaviour Science, 125(1-2), 38-46. DOI: 10.1016/j.applanim.2010.03.007  

  • November 5, 2014
  • 08:00 AM
  • 92 views

Doing More With Less

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

Animal-like protists are similar to animal cells, but they do many things in their single cell that we have a hard time competing with. New research shows that they may be useful in medicine, as well as lethal in some cases. N. fowleri is a brain eating amoeba, but calcium tests of foraminifera may be helpful in bone grafts and repairing skull fractures.... Read more »

Sifuentes LY, Choate BL, Gerba CP, & Bright KR. (2014) The occurrence of Naegleria fowleri in recreational waters in Arizona. Journal of environmental science and health. Part A, Toxic/hazardous substances , 49(11), 1322-30. PMID: 24967566  

  • November 5, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 62 views

Simple Jury Persuasion: The “not in my town!” effect

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

A couple of years ago we were working for the Plaintiff on pretrial research for a case against a large national healthcare corporation. The Plaintiff had been injured quite dramatically due to what she alleged was the Defendant’s lack of care (i.e., negligence) in selling her what company executives knew to be a pharmaceutical product […]

Related posts:
Simple Jury Persuasion: The ‘Scott Peterson Effect’—Displayed remorse and conviction
Simple Jury Persuasion: The innuendo effec........ Read more »

  • November 5, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 102 views

You've heard of "Owls" and "Larks", now sleep scientists propose two more chronotypes

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

For many years psychologists have divided people into two types based on their sleeping habits. There are Larks who rise early, feel sprightly in the morning, and retire to bed early; and Owls, who do the opposite, preferring to get up late and who come alive in the evening.Have you ever thought that you don't fit either pattern; that you're neither a morning nor evening person? Even in good health, maybe you feel sluggish most of the time, or conversely, perhaps you feel high energy in the morn........ Read more »

  • November 5, 2014
  • 04:39 AM
  • 98 views

(Partly) explaining the increase in the prevalence of autism

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"Changes in reporting practices can account for most (60%) of the increase in the observed prevalence of ASDs [autism spectrum disorders] in children born from 1980 through 1991 in Denmark."Prince of Denmark @ Wikipedia That was the headline conclusion reported by Stefan Nygaard Hansen and colleagues [1] based on an analysis of births in Denmark between 1st January 1980 and 31st December 1991 (N=677,915) followed up until 31st December 2011 (or "until ASD diagnosis, deat........ Read more »

  • November 5, 2014
  • 12:39 AM
  • 74 views

New type of vaccine-resistant polio virus

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Point:

Scientists have found a new type of polio virus that is thought to be responsible for the major epidemics of polio cases in the recent times. This polio virus is not affected by polio vaccines.

Published in:

PNAS

Study Further:

Polio is an acute form of viral disease that is caused by inflammation of nerve cells of the brain stem and spinal cord. Virus behind this disease is poliomyelitis. Science has successfully helped humanity in reducing the number of polio cases b........ Read more »

Drexler, J., Grard, G., Lukashev, A., Kozlovskaya, L., Bottcher, S., Uslu, G., Reimerink, J., Gmyl, A., Taty-Taty, R., Lekana-Douki, S.... (2014) Robustness against serum neutralization of a poliovirus type 1 from a lethal epidemic of poliomyelitis in the Republic of Congo in 2010. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 111(35), 12889-12894. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1323502111  

  • November 5, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 78 views

Cool It Down Before You Work It Out

by Kyle Harris in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Among knees with a history of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and chronic quadriceps dysfunction, the application of cryotherapy prior to performing exercises may help mitigate arthrogenic muscle inhibition and improve muscle function.... Read more »

  • November 4, 2014
  • 05:46 PM
  • 128 views

Steak is bad for the Heart and now We Know why

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

“Red meat is bad for your heart”, that is typically the story we hear from people. While some might take this as meat is bad for us, or that it is wrong to eat red meat, science has been trying to find a better answer to that question. After all it wouldn’t do for science to say, it just does. Well as luck may have it, new research provides details on how gut bacteria turn a nutrient found in red meat into metabolites that increase the risk of developing heart disease. The findings may lea........ Read more »

Koeth RA, Wang Z, Levison BS, Buffa JA, Org E, Sheehy BT, Britt EB, Fu X, Wu Y, Li L.... (2013) Intestinal microbiota metabolism of L-carnitine, a nutrient in red meat, promotes atherosclerosis. Nature medicine, 19(5), 576-85. PMID: 23563705  

Robert A. Koeth, Bruce S. Levison, Miranda K. Culley, Jennifer A. Buff, Zeneng Wang, Jill C. Gregory, Elin Org, Yuping Wu, Lin Li, Jonathan D. Smith, W.H. Wilson Tang, Joseph A. DiDonato.... (2014) g-Butyrobetaine is a proatherogenic intermediate in gut microbial metabolism of L-carnitine to TMAO. Cell Press. info:/10.1016/j.cmet.2014.10.006.

  • November 4, 2014
  • 02:28 PM
  • 91 views

How many smells can a smelly person smell? 1 trillion or 10?

by neuroecology in Neuroecology

Earlier this year, a paper in Science attempted to answer the question: how many smells can we actually smell? At least one trillion, they claimed. Recently, Markus Meister posted a paper on arxiv which made the bold claim that we can … Continue reading →... Read more »

Bushdid, C., Magnasco, M., Vosshall, L., & Keller, A. (2014) Humans Can Discriminate More than 1 Trillion Olfactory Stimuli. Science, 343(6177), 1370-1372. DOI: 10.1126/science.1249168  

Meister M. (2014) Can Humans Really Discriminate 1 Trillion Odors?. arXiv. info:/

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