Post List

  • July 15, 2015
  • 08:25 AM
  • 90 views

Ovaries March To A Different Drummer

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

A woman’s right ovary kicks her left ovary’s behind. It puts out more hormones and more pregnancies result from right-sided ovulations than from left-sided ovulations. And there’s none of this right-left stuff you’ve been taught, the ovaries don’t have to take turns ovulating every other month. In fact, a study showed that the best chance for pregnancy is if the ovulation pattern is left-left-right over a three-cycle interval. ... Read more »

Zheng, X., O’Connor, J., Huchzermeyer, F., Wang, X., Wang, Y., Wang, M., & Zhou, Z. (2013) Preservation of ovarian follicles reveals early evolution of avian reproductive behaviour. Nature, 495(7442), 507-511. DOI: 10.1038/nature11985  

  • July 15, 2015
  • 08:09 AM
  • 99 views

Older people frequently underestimate their own memory skills

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

By guest blogger David RobsonAristotle once compared the human mind to a wax tablet. When we are young, the wax is warm and soft; it is easy to make an impression and record our thoughts and feelings. With age, the wax hardens – the older impressions fade, and it is harder to carve out new images in their place.This view of memory, at least among the general public, has changed little in the 2300 years since. Many of us still believe that the brain’s “plasticity” – its ability to adapt........ Read more »

  • July 15, 2015
  • 07:56 AM
  • 100 views

Women and Words: Women Who Read Objectifying Words More Likely to Seek Cosmetic Surgery

by Jeremiah Stanghini in Jeremiah Stanghini

I’ve tried to write about this article on a few occasions and had to stop because I simply felt terrible with the implications of the research. In short, as the headline of this post suggests, when women read words that are objectifying, they’re … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • July 15, 2015
  • 07:46 AM
  • 17 views

Primary Care Continuity Reduced Emergency Department Use and Hospitalizations

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Nadereh Pourat, PhD Professor, Department of Health Policy and Management, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health Adjunct Professor, UCLA School of Dentistry Director of Research, UCLA Center for Health Policy Research Medical Research: What is the background … Continue reading →
The post Primary Care Continuity Reduced Emergency Department Use and Hospitalizations appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

Nadereh Pourat, PhD. (2015) Primary Care Continuity Reduced Emergency Department Use and Hospitalizations. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • July 15, 2015
  • 07:26 AM
  • 28 views

Co-ingestion of Benzodiazepines and Opioids Contributes to Overdose and Death

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Christopher M. Jones, Pharm D., M.P.H Senior advisor, Office of Public Health Strategy and Analysis Office of the Commissioner, Food and Drug Administration Medical Research: What is the background for this study? Dr. Jones: Opioid analgesics and … Continue reading →
The post Co-ingestion of Benzodiazepines and Opioids Contributes to Overdose and Death appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

Christopher M. Jones, Pharm D., M.P.H. (2015) Co-ingestion of Benzodiazepines and Opioids Contributes to Overdose and Death. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • July 15, 2015
  • 05:14 AM
  • 123 views

Cochrane does chelation for autism

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Cochrane, in the title of this post, refers to the Cochrane Collaboration and the sterling work done throughout health care synthesising peer-reviewed evidence pertinent to the goal of evidence-based medicine.The collaboration has recently turned its eye towards the topic of chelation with autism in mind, a topic that has been discussed previously on this blog (see here). Their conclusions based on the findings reported by Stephen James and colleagues [1] (open-access here), looking at the ........ Read more »

James S, Stevenson SW, Silove N, & Williams K. (2015) Chelation for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The Cochrane database of systematic reviews. PMID: 26106752  

  • July 15, 2015
  • 04:09 AM
  • 103 views

Can Tetris Reduce Intrusive Memories of a Trauma Film?

by The Neurocritic in The Neurocritic

For some inexplicable reason, you watched the torture gore horror film Hostel over the weekend. On Monday, you're having trouble concentrating at work. Images of severed limbs and bludgeoned heads keep intruding on your attempts to code or write a paper. So you decide to read about the making of Hostel.You end up seeing pictures of the most horrifying scenes from the movie. It's all way too way much to simply shake off so then you decide to play Tetris. But a funny thing happens. The unwelcome i........ Read more »

  • July 15, 2015
  • 03:39 AM
  • 112 views

Frightful language tests

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

In the Middle Ages those suspected of witchcraft were often subjected to a ‘trial by fire’ to prove their innocence or guilt. The idea was that fire was a divine manifestation and hence the ordeal of being burnt would result … Continue reading →... Read more »

Young, M. M. (1989) Comment: The Salem Witch Trials 300 Years Later: How Far Has the American Legal System Come? How Much Further Does It Need to Go?. Tulane Law Review, 234-258. info:/

  • July 15, 2015
  • 12:05 AM
  • 84 views

Does Sport Participation Give You a Longer Life?

by Kyle Harris in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Former elite athletes have a longer life expectancy than demographically-matched control patients. Those athletes participating in soccer, basketball, ice hockey, jumping, short distance running, hurdling, cross-country skiing, middle and long distance runners suffer from heart disease less than control patients.... Read more »

Kettunen, J., Kujala, U., Kaprio, J., Backmand, H., Peltonen, M., Eriksson, J., & Sarna, S. (2014) All-cause and disease-specific mortality among male, former elite athletes: an average 50-year follow-up. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 49(13), 893-897. DOI: 10.1136/bjsports-2013-093347  

  • July 14, 2015
  • 04:33 PM
  • 17 views

Putting More People On Statins Would Be Cost Effective and Improve Heart Health

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Ankur Pandya Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Health Decision Science Department of Health Policy and Management Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Boston, MA Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the … Continue reading →
The post Putting More People On Statins Would Be Cost Effective and Improve Heart Health appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

Dr. Ankur Pandya Ph.D. (2015) Putting More People On Statins Would Be Cost Effective and Improve Heart Health. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • July 14, 2015
  • 03:18 PM
  • 145 views

Intellectual pursuits may buffer the brain against addiction

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Challenging the idea that addiction is hardwired in the brain, a new study suggests that even a short time spent in a stimulating learning environment can rewire the brain’s reward system and buffer it against drug dependence. Scientists tracked cocaine cravings in more than 70 adult male mice and found that those rodents whose daily drill included exploration, learning and finding hidden tasty morsels were less likely than their enrichment-deprived counterparts to seek solace in a chamber whe........ Read more »

  • July 14, 2015
  • 02:14 PM
  • 81 views

Extremely harmful chemicals have all sorts of smells

by Rosin Cerate in Rosin Cerate

Our sense of smell likely evolved to help us avoid eating harmful stuff such as poisonous plants or spoiled foods. It's particularly useful since we can employ it prior to actually placing anything in our mouth. To smell something is to detect and interpret airborne molecules, which often arise from a nearby liquid or solid. These molecules enter our nose and activate olfactory receptors, producing signals that travel to the brain where a smell is perceived. We have hundreds of receptor typ........ Read more »

Erickson, T., Thompson, T., & Lu, J. (2007) The approach to the patient with an unknown overdose. Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America, 25(2), 249-281. DOI: 10.1016/j.emc.2007.02.004  

  • July 14, 2015
  • 10:20 AM
  • 21 views

Lack of Sleep May Impair Memory Functions In Stressful Situations

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Jonathan Cedernaes M.D., Ph.D. Department of Neuroscience Uppsala University Sweden Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Cedernaes: Sleep is known to facilitate the formation of long-term memory in … Continue reading →
The post Lack of Sleep May Impair Memory Functions In Stressful Situations appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

Jonathan Cedernaes M.D., Ph.D. (2015) Lack of Sleep May Impair Memory Functions In Stressful Situations. medicalresearch. info:/

  • July 14, 2015
  • 09:57 AM
  • 79 views

May Be Possible To Use Video Games To Block PTSD Intrusive Memories

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com interview with Dr. Ella James, Post-Doctoral Investigator Scientist Medical Research Council Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit Cambridge, UK. MedicalResearch: What is the background for this study? Dr. James: Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is experienced by some people after a … Continue reading →
The post May Be Possible To Use Video Games To Block PTSD Intrusive Memories appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

Dr. Ella James, Post-Doctoral Investigator Scientist. (2015) May Be Possible To Use Video Games To Block PTSD Intrusive Memories. medicalresearch.com. info:/

  • July 14, 2015
  • 09:00 AM
  • 78 views

Complexities Of Allergic Disease

by Julia van Rensburg in The 'Scope

Approximately 25% of the world’s population suffers from allergies, making it one of the most common chronic diseases. What factors may be contributing to this?... Read more »

  • July 14, 2015
  • 07:37 AM
  • 89 views

What is the correct way to talk about autism? There isn't one

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

Image: National Autistic Society. The language we use reflects our attitudes but perhaps more important, it can shape those attitudes. A new study considers this power in the context of autism. Lorcan Kenny and his colleagues have conducted a UK survey of hundreds of autistic people; parents, relatives and carers of autistic adults and children; and professionals in the field, about their preferences for the language used to discuss autism. The research was conducted online with the help of........ Read more »

  • July 14, 2015
  • 06:09 AM
  • 100 views

Laughing Hyenas Have Social Network Too

by jeffrey daniels in United Academics

Hyenas, like humans, are social animals. It turns out that a hyena, as is usually the case with humans, won’t befriend all the members in their clan. Extensive research reveals their social network strategies... Read more »

  • July 14, 2015
  • 04:55 AM
  • 98 views

Vitamin D, schizophrenia and CRP

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

A quote to begin: "The evidence suggested that high levels of vitamin D may be linked to reduced risk of schizophrenia with elevated CRP [C-reactive protein]."That was the bottom line reported by Dao-min Zhu and colleagues [1] who measured plasma concentrations of CRP and 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] in 93 people with schizophrenia and "93 family-matched controls." Finding that: "Mean levels of CRP and 25(OH)D were 43.3% higher and 26.7% lower for patients compared to contro........ Read more »

  • July 13, 2015
  • 08:06 PM
  • 67 views

Women’s Out-of-Pocket Expenses For Contraceptives Drop After ACA

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Nora V. Becker MD/PhD candidate Department of Health Care Management and Economics Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, in Philadelphia. Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: The Affordable Care … Continue reading →
The post Women’s Out-of-Pocket Expenses For Contraceptives Drop After ACA appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

Nora V. Becker MD/PhD candidate. (2015) Women's Out-of-Pocket Expenses For Contraceptives Drop After ACA. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • July 13, 2015
  • 07:53 PM
  • 61 views

Clinically Silent Maternal Cancer Detectable By Prenatal Testing

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Diana W. Bianchi, M.D. Executive Director, Mother Infant Research Institute Vice Chair for Research and Academic Affairs Department of Pediatrics Tufts Medical Center Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? … Continue reading →
The post Clinically Silent Maternal Cancer Detectable By Prenatal Testing appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

Diana W. Bianchi, M.D. (2015) Clinically Silent Maternal Cancer Detectable By Prenatal Testing. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

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