Post List

  • August 6, 2014
  • 08:15 AM
  • 119 views

Fall Leaves And Orange Flamingos

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

Flamingos are pink because of their diet, but greater and lesser flamingos eat different things – and neither food is pink. The spirulina food of the lesser flamingo is a cyanobacterium called Arthospira fusiformis. Unforunately, there have been large die offs in lesser flamingos. Recent research has shown that this may be due to toxic alga blooms and production of toxins even by A. fusiformis. In addition, a newer study has shown that a bacteriophage is responsible for large die offs of A........ Read more »

Anderson MJ, & Williams SA. (2010) Why do flamingos stand on one leg?. Zoo biology, 29(3), 365-74. PMID: 19637281  

Peduzzi P, Gruber M, Gruber M, Schagerl M. (2014) The virus's tooth: cyanophages affect an African flamingo population in a bottom-up cascade. ISME J. , 8(6), 1346-1351. info:/

  • August 6, 2014
  • 06:16 AM
  • 120 views

Material Efficiently Traps Gases From Nuclear Fuel

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

A new porous material called CC3 effectively traps radioactive krypton and xenon gases that are released when nuclear fuel is recycled.... Read more »

Chen, L., Reiss, P., Chong, S., Holden, D., Jelfs, K., Hasell, T., Little, M., Kewley, A., Briggs, M., Stephenson, A.... (2014) Separation of rare gases and chiral molecules by selective binding in porous organic cages. Nature Materials. DOI: 10.1038/nmat4035  

  • August 6, 2014
  • 04:40 AM
  • 54 views

Welcome to the weird world of weight illusions

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

Normally bigger objects weigh more; breaking this rule provokes illusory perceptionsVisual illusions are useful to psychologists because, by tricking the brain, they provide clues about how it works. The same is true for weight illusions, it's just that they're far less well known. Now Gavin Buckingham at Heriot-Watt University has published a handy review of weight illusions, and he explores some of the thinking about their likely causes.Among the most studied is known as the "size-weight illus........ Read more »

  • August 6, 2014
  • 04:39 AM
  • 148 views

Gastrointestinal response to A1 vs A2 milk

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I want to talk about the findings from Ho and colleagues [1] today, and in particular their observation of: "differences in gastrointestinal responses in some adult humans consuming milk containing beta-casein of either the A1 or the A2 beta-casein type". If you're wondering why such a paper finds it's way on to a blog predominantly about autism research, well stay with me on this rather long blogging entry...Start your engines... @ Wikipedia Before progressing, I am going to put a sor........ Read more »

  • August 6, 2014
  • 02:27 AM
  • 163 views

Does AA work for young people?

by DJMac in Recovery Review

Evidence has accumulated over the last couple of decades of the association between attendance at Alcoholics Anonymous and improved drinking outcomes, including abstinence. AA is sometimes seen as an organisation that is better suited to older drinkers seeking sobriety than to folk under thirty, though there are in fact young people’s meetings in various large [...]
The post Does AA work for young people? appeared first on Recovery Review.
... Read more »

  • August 6, 2014
  • 12:04 AM
  • 118 views

Female Athletic Trainers Balancing Life and Motherhood

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Female mentors/role models who are successfully maintaining work-life balance are critical to the success and retention of quality female athletic trainers at the NCAA Division I level.... Read more »

  • August 6, 2014
  • 12:03 AM
  • 111 views

Galen may have been (partly) right.

by Allison in Dormivigilia

Research in California has re-opened the ancient medical texts by identifying factors in the blood of young adult mice that may slow the rate of neurodegeneration in aged mice. Even Steven Colbert digs it. ... Read more »

Villeda, S., Plambeck, K., Middeldorp, J., Castellano, J., Mosher, K., Luo, J., Smith, L., Bieri, G., Lin, K., Berdnik, D.... (2014) Young blood reverses age-related impairments in cognitive function and synaptic plasticity in mice. Nature Medicine, 20(6), 659-663. DOI: 10.1038/nm.3569  

  • August 5, 2014
  • 11:00 PM
  • 116 views

What is the Best Way to Manage Cardiac Arrest According to the Evidence?

by Rogue Medic in Rogue Medic

There is an excellent review article by Dr. Bentley Bobrow and Dr. Gordon Ewy on the best management of sudden cardiac arrest from the bystander to the ICU (Intensive Care Unit).

They point out something that we tend to resist learning. Cardiac arrest that is not due to respiratory causes does not need respiratory treatment. A person who is unresponsive and gasping is exhibiting signs of cardiac arrest, not signs of respiratory problems.... Read more »

  • August 5, 2014
  • 07:24 PM
  • 180 views

Sink-or-swim for international students

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

It is one of the basic findings of decades of research in bilingual education that language submersion is not a productive way to educate minority students. ‘Language submersion’ refers to a situation where students are made to study exclusively through … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • August 5, 2014
  • 01:28 PM
  • 129 views

Weight loss Stalled? Kick those Hunger Cravings!

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Trying to drop the weight, but find yourself picking up more of it? Is your diet failing because you are so hungry you could eat a horse?  Well a new […]... Read more »

Li SS, Kendall CW, de Souza RJ, Jayalath VH, Cozma AI, Ha V, Mirrahimi A, Chiavaroli L, Augustin LS, Blanco Mejia S.... (2014) Dietary pulses, satiety and food intake: A systematic review and meta-analysis of acute feeding trials. Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.), 22(8), 1773-80. PMID: 24820437  

  • August 5, 2014
  • 12:29 PM
  • 47 views

Implanted Neurons Derived from Skin Become Part of the Brain

by beredim in Stem Cells Freak

Researchers at the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB) of the University of Luxembourg have grafted neurons reprogrammed from skin cells into the brains of mice for the first time with long-term stability. Six months after implantation, the neurons had become fully functionally integrated into the brain.This successful, lastingly stable, implantation of neurons raises hope for future therapies that will replace sick neurons with healthy ones in the brains of Parkinson's disease ........ Read more »

Hemmer, K., Zhang, M., van Wüllen, T., Sakalem, M., Tapia, N., Baumuratov, A., Kaltschmidt, C., Kaltschmidt, B., Schöler, H., Zhang, W.... (2014) Induced Neural Stem Cells Achieve Long-Term Survival and Functional Integration in the Adult Mouse Brain. Stem Cell Reports. DOI: 10.1016/j.stemcr.2014.06.017  

  • August 5, 2014
  • 12:17 PM
  • 37 views

Frankfurt-Based Researchers Discover Weakness of Leukemic Stem Cells

by beredim in Stem Cells Freak

Despite improvements in therapy, only one out of every two adult patients survive acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). The mean survival time for this disease, which predominantly occurs in the elderly, is less than a year for patients over 65 years. It is assumed that leukaemic stem cells, which cannot be completely eliminated during treatment, are the origin of relapse. However, as has been discovered by a team of Frankfurt-based researchers, these cells do have a weakness: In the current edition o........ Read more »

  • August 5, 2014
  • 10:51 AM
  • 102 views

Kids Name the Darnedest Animals

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish

Here’s an experiment that’s easy to do on your own. Grab the nearest elementary- or middle-school-age kid, sit her down in a quiet place, and ask her to name everything she can think of that’s alive. The results might tell you a lot about your young subject’s life. The wilder the animals, the more domestic […]The post Kids Name the Darnedest Animals appeared first on Inkfish.... Read more »

  • August 5, 2014
  • 05:29 AM
  • 241 views

Play music and you’ll see more

by Richard Kunert in Brain's Idea

  Check out the video. It is a short demonstration of the so-called attentional blink. Whenever you try to spot the two letters in the rapid sequence you’ll miss the second one. This effect is so robust that generations of Psychology undergraduates learned about it. And then came music and changed everything. Test your own […]... Read more »

  • August 5, 2014
  • 04:25 AM
  • 54 views

Why was Darth Vader so evil? Blame his lack of parental care, say psychologists

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

Image: wikipediaWhy was Darth Vader such a bad dude? According to a team of psychologists led by Peter Jonason, it's down to his lack of parental care: the fact he was separated from his mother at age 9, and his father's absence. The researchers believe such circumstances can catalyse the emergence of the Dark Triad of personality traits: Machiavellianism, Narcissism and Psychopathy. These traits are usually seen as negative, but Jonason and his colleagues believe they may be an adaptive respons........ Read more »

Jonason, P., Lyons, M., & Bethell, E. (2014) The making of Darth Vader: Parent–child care and the Dark Triad. Personality and Individual Differences, 30-34. DOI: 10.1016/j.paid.2013.10.006  

  • August 5, 2014
  • 04:05 AM
  • 124 views

Bipolar disorder is frequent in adult Asperger syndrome

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"BD [bipolar disorder] in AS [Asperger syndrome] patients is frequent, usually it onsets during adolescence and is often characterized by atypical presentation, making its correct identification particularly difficult".Maybe I'm better suited as a brunette? @ WikipediaThat was the primary finding reported by Vannucchi and colleagues [1] based on their systematic review of the relevant peer-reviewed research literature in this area. They found that the prevalence of BD ranged ........ Read more »

Vannucchi G, Masi G, Toni C, Dell׳Osso L, Erfurth A, & Perugi G. (2014) Bipolar disorder in adults with Asperger׳s Syndrome: A systematic review. Journal of affective disorders, 151-160. PMID: 25046741  

  • August 4, 2014
  • 09:32 PM
  • 115 views

The effects of shoes and barefoot on postural stability

by Craig Payne in Running Research Junkie

The effects of shoes and barefoot on postural stability... Read more »

  • August 4, 2014
  • 06:05 PM
  • 126 views

Do Sciences and Humanities Students’ Brains Differ?

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

Scholars on both sides of the science-humanities divide have been known to feel that their counterparts just don’t think in the same way. But could it be that their brains are actually different? Yes, it could, say Japanese neuroscientists Hikaru Takeuchi and colleagues, who have just published a paper about Brain structures in the sciences […]The post Do Sciences and Humanities Students’ Brains Differ? appeared first on Neuroskeptic.... Read more »

Takeuchi H, Taki Y, Sekiguchi A, Nouchi R, Kotozaki Y, Nakagawa S, Miyauchi CM, Iizuka K, Yokoyama R, Shinada T.... (2014) Brain structures in the sciences and humanities. Brain structure . PMID: 25079346  

  • August 4, 2014
  • 03:00 PM
  • 19 views

One Gene, One Cancer

by Viputheshwar Sitaraman in Draw Science

A mutation in the BRAF gene, called V599E, is purportedly the cause of several different cell pathways leading to the symptoms of melanoma. This mutation is present in many patients with melanoma, and stopping it could mean a cure or treatment.... Read more »

Hingorani SR, Jacobetz MA, Robertson GP, Herlyn M, & Tuveson DA. (2003) Suppression of BRAF(V599E) in human melanoma abrogates transformation. Cancer research, 63(17), 5198-202. PMID: 14500344  

  • August 4, 2014
  • 02:03 PM
  • 0 views

Nature Helps

by Rodney Steadman in Gravity's Pull

Exposure to scenes of natural beauty increases prosocial behaviours.... Read more »

Rodney Steadman. (2014) Nature Helps. Gravity's Pull. info:/

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