Post List

  • January 13, 2017
  • 05:00 AM
  • 241 views

Friday Fellow: Branching Vase Sponge

by Piter Boll in Earthling Nature

by Piter Kehoma Boll A fascinating group of animals that has not yet joined the Friday Fellows are the sponges. Different from all other animals, sponges have a unique body structure that behaves more like a plant or fungus. They … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • January 13, 2017
  • 03:13 AM
  • 298 views

Exercise as an intervention for anxiety?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"Our data suggest that exercise is more effective than control at reducing anxiety symptoms."So said the meta-analysis published by Brendan Stubbs and colleagues [1] who surveyed the peer-reviewed literature "investigating the benefits of exercise compared to usual treatment or control conditions in people with an anxiety and/or stress-related disorders." From the 6 randomised, controlled trials found "from inception until December 2015" exercise (various types of exercise regime) did seem to ha........ Read more »

  • January 13, 2017
  • 02:40 AM
  • 256 views

Acute coronary syndrome on Friday the 13th: a case for re-organising services?

by Rogue Medic in Rogue Medic

"However, patients admitted on five day/number combinations were 20-30% more likely to survive at 13 years. These findings could be explained by subgroup analysis inflation of the type I error, although supernatural causes merit further investigation.[1]"

No. Supernatural causes do not merit further investigation, at least, not based on anything in this paper.

The authors used Friday the 13th as their "normal" date for comparison with every other date, but the outcomes ........ Read more »

Protty, M., Jaafar, M., Hannoodee, S., & Freeman, P. (2016) Acute coronary syndrome on Friday the 13th: a case for re-organising services?. The Medical Journal of Australia, 205(11), 523-525. DOI: 10.5694/mja16.00870  

  • January 12, 2017
  • 04:28 AM
  • 261 views

On autism risk and immigrant status

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"Fifteen studies suggest a higher prevalence rate of ASDs [autism spectrum disorder] among children of immigrants in comparison to native children."Those fifteen studies formed a large part of the seventeen studies included in the review by Rafal Kawa and colleagues [1] who set out to look at the collected peer-reviewed literature on the topic of the "prevalence and risk for ASD in Europe among immigrants and ethnic minorities." Carried out as part of a European Union (EU) initiative t........ Read more »

Kawa R, Saemundsen E, Lóa Jónsdóttir S, Hellendoorn A, Lemcke S, Canal-Bedia R, García-Primo P, & Moilanen I. (2016) European studies on prevalence and risk of autism spectrum disorders according to immigrant status-a review. European journal of public health. PMID: 28013245  

  • January 11, 2017
  • 12:00 PM
  • 215 views

The Five Domains Model Aims to Help Animals Thrive

by CAPB in Companion Animal Psychology Blog

An updated approach to animal welfare includes opportunities for positive experiences for our companion (and other) animals.  “…the overall objective is to provide opportunities for animals to ‘thrive’, not simply ‘survive’” (Mellor, 2016)The Five FreedomsAnimal welfare is traditionally defined by the Five Freedoms. These areFreedom from hunger and thirstFreedom from discomfortFreedom from pain, injury and diseaseFreedom to express normal behaviourFreedom from fear and distres........ Read more »

  • January 11, 2017
  • 08:00 AM
  • 335 views

DNA Methylation in the Placenta: accelerated aging in pregnancy complications

by Tina Bianco-Miotto in EpiBeat

The placenta is a unique organ as it is an extra-embryonic tissue primarily regulated by the fetal genome and shared between mother and fetus. However, it is a transient organ that is only needed throughout pregnancy and gestation and then is discarded after delivery. The essential role of the placenta in pregnancy is unquestionable but, surprisingly, as highlighted by the NIH NICHD Human Placenta Project (https://www.nichd.nih.gov/research/HPP/Pages/default.aspx), it is the human organ we know ........ Read more »

Bianco-Miotto T, Mayne BT, Buckberry S, Breen J, Rodriguez Lopez CM, & Roberts CT. (2016) Recent progress towards understanding the role of DNA methylation in human placental development. Reproduction (Cambridge, England), 152(1). PMID: 27026712  

Ehrlich M, Gama-Sosa MA, Huang LH, Midgett RM, Kuo KC, McCune RA, & Gehrke C. (1982) Amount and distribution of 5-methylcytosine in human DNA from different types of tissues of cells. Nucleic acids research, 10(8), 2709-21. PMID: 7079182  

Fuke C, Shimabukuro M, Petronis A, Sugimoto J, Oda T, Miura K, Miyazaki T, Ogura C, Okazaki Y, & Jinno Y. (2004) Age related changes in 5-methylcytosine content in human peripheral leukocytes and placentas: an HPLC-based study. Annals of human genetics, 68(Pt 3), 196-204. PMID: 15180700  

Schroeder DI, Blair JD, Lott P, Yu HO, Hong D, Crary F, Ashwood P, Walker C, Korf I, Robinson WP.... (2013) The human placenta methylome. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 110(15), 6037-42. PMID: 23530188  

Robinson WP, & Price EM. (2015) The human placental methylome. Cold Spring Harbor perspectives in medicine, 5(5). PMID: 25722473  

Marioni RE, Shah S, McRae AF, Chen BH, Colicino E, Harris SE, Gibson J, Henders AK, Redmond P, Cox SR.... (2015) DNA methylation age of blood predicts all-cause mortality in later life. Genome biology, 25. PMID: 25633388  

  • January 11, 2017
  • 05:46 AM
  • 447 views

Two Manifestos for Better Science

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover



Two new papers outline urge scientists to make research more reproducible.



First off, Russ Poldrack and colleagues writing in Nature Reviews Neuroscience discuss how to achieve transparent and reproducible neuroimaging research. Neuroimaging techniques, such as fMRI, are enormously powerful tools for neuroscientists but, Poldrack et al. say, they are at risk of "a ‘perfect storm’ of irreproducible results". because the "high dimensionality of fMRI data, the relatively low power of mos... Read more »

Poldrack RA, Baker CI, Durnez J, Gorgolewski KJ, Matthews PM, Munafò MR, Nichols TE, Poline JB, Vul E, & Yarkoni T. (2017) Scanning the horizon: towards transparent and reproducible neuroimaging research. Nature reviews. Neuroscience. PMID: 28053326  

Marcus R. Munafò, Brian A. Nosek, Dorothy V. M. Bishop, Katherine S. Button,, Christopher D. Chambers, Nathalie Percie du Sert, Uri Simonsohn, Eric-Jan Wagenmakers,, & Jennifer J. Ware and John P. A. Ioannidis. (2017) A manifesto for reproducible science. Nat Hum Behav. info:/

  • January 11, 2017
  • 04:30 AM
  • 262 views

A Call for High Quality Evidence Linking Movement Screenings to Injury Risk

by Laura McDonald in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

There is limited evidence that poor movement quality is associated with a greater risk of lower extremity injury in athletic and military/first-responder populations.... Read more »

Whittaker JL, Booysen N, de la Motte S, Dennett L, Lewis CL, Wilson D, McKay C, Warner M, Padua D, Emery CA.... (2016) Predicting sport and occupational lower extremity injury risk through movement quality screening: a systematic review. British journal of sports medicine. PMID: 27935483  

  • January 11, 2017
  • 03:24 AM
  • 297 views

"the patient improved significantly when a gluten-free diet was started"

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The quote making up the title of this post comes from the case report described by Albino J Oliveira-Maia and colleagues [1] talking yet again about how coeliac disease - the archetypal autoimmune condition where dietary gluten is the baddie - may have effects well beyond just the physical.Describing the experiences of a woman who was admitted to a psychiatry inpatient unit on the basis of "suicidal behaviours" who also "developed an agitated catatonic state", a mix of "antidepressants, anx........ Read more »

Oliveira-Maia AJ, Andrade I, & Barahona-Corrêa JB. (2016) Case of coeliac disease presenting in the psychiatry ward. BMJ case reports. PMID: 28003229  

  • January 10, 2017
  • 09:00 AM
  • 270 views

The Rise Of Superbugs: How Bacteria Defeat Antibiotics

by Bill Sullivan in The 'Scope

Mechanisms of antibiotic resistance... Read more »

Blair, J., Webber, M., Baylay, A., Ogbolu, D., & Piddock, L. (2014) Molecular mechanisms of antibiotic resistance. Nature Reviews Microbiology, 13(1), 42-51. DOI: 10.1038/nrmicro3380  

  • January 10, 2017
  • 07:24 AM
  • 282 views

Adoption of open peer review is increasing

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

In analyzing how the 'peer review' institution has emerged and evolved, it is possible to understand the current transition the assessment process is going through towards greater openness, transparency and accountability. … Read More →... Read more »

Csiszar, A. (2016) Peer review: Troubled from the start. Nature, 532(7599), 306-308. DOI: 10.1038/532306a  

Callaway, E. (2016) Open peer review finds more takers. Nature, 539(7629), 343-343. DOI: 10.1038/nature.2016.20969  

  • January 10, 2017
  • 03:19 AM
  • 277 views

PACE trial recovery data and chronic fatigue syndrome

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

PACE mentioned in the title of this post refers to the PACE trial [1] which concluded that: "CBT [cognitive behaviour therapy] and GET [graded exercise therapy] can safely be added to SMC [specialist medical care] to moderately improve outcomes for chronic fatigue syndrome, but APT [adaptive pacing therapy] is not an effective addition."The recent paper by Carolyn Wilshire and colleagues [2] who drew on "relevant normative data and other research" continue........ Read more »

  • January 10, 2017
  • 01:49 AM
  • 258 views

Blocking obesity with a protein-sugar combination

by adam phillips in It Ain't Magic

Discovery of an enzyme that prevents obesity in mice through glycosylation of a protein involved fat-cell differentiation.... Read more »

Kaburagi T, Kizuka Y, Kitazume S, & Taniguchi N. (2016) Inhibitory role of α2,6-sialylation in adipogenesis. The Journal of biological chemistry. PMID: 28031460  

  • January 9, 2017
  • 08:09 AM
  • 75 views

Study shows vulnerabilities of GPS-dependent systems to electromagnetic attacks

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective | Press Releases

The study identifies the levels of jamming power and distance required to disable GPS-dependent systems such as cell phones, and those used in automotive and aeronautical applications. Open source software was used to analyze the data collected to identify vulnerabilities in these systems, as well as proper countermeasures to undertake. The results were published by the research team from the Brazilian Aeronautical Institute of Technology in the Journal of Aerospace Technology and Management. &#........ Read more »

Faria, L., Silvestre, C., & Correia, M. (2016) GPS-Dependent Systems: Vulnerabilities to Electromagnetic Attacks. Journal of Aerospace Technology and Management, 8(4), 423-430. DOI: 10.5028/jatm.v8i4.632  

  • January 9, 2017
  • 07:02 AM
  • 292 views

 Tattoo you—On attraction, impulsivity, pathology, and trustworthiness

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

Here’s an update on the stash of tattoo posts we have here. This is a collection of new research on tattoos (to make sure we are up to date) that will undoubtedly help you decide what your individual ink means/will mean, and of course, what it suggests about your jurors, your clients, your kids, and […]... Read more »

  • January 9, 2017
  • 05:48 AM
  • 285 views

The curious effect of a musical rhythm on us

by Richard Kunert in Brain's Idea

Do you know the feeling of a musical piece moving you? What is this feeling? One common answer by psychological researchers is that what you feel is your attention moving in sync with the music. In a new paper I show that this explanation is mistaken. Watch the start of the following video and observe […]... Read more »

Kunert R, & Jongman SR. (2017) Entrainment to an auditory signal: Is attention involved?. Journal of experimental psychology. General, 146(1), 77-88. PMID: 28054814  

  • January 9, 2017
  • 04:48 AM
  • 243 views

H255Y and K508R missense mutations in FLCN promote kidney neoplasia

by Joana Guedes in BHD Research Blog

The germline FLCN missense mutations H255Y (Hasumi et al., 2009) and K508R (Toro et al., 2008) have been identified in patients with bilateral multifocal (BMF) kidney tumours and other clinical symptoms of Birt-Hogg-Dube (BHD) syndrome, or with BMF kidney tumours as the only manifestation. Building on their previous work identifying the H255Y mutation in human BHD kidney tumour, Hasumi et al. (2016) investigated whether these mutations have an impact on FLCN function. The authors evaluated the F........ Read more »

  • January 9, 2017
  • 04:26 AM
  • 322 views

T. gondii and OCD?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

It's been a while since I've talked about Toxoplasma gondii on this blog; the parasite that more than most, has been linked with all-manner of different psychiatric labels (see here for example). Although still the topic of some discussion, I'm swayed towards the possibility that there may be some important *associations* to be seen when it comes to this survivor and human behaviour(s) outside of just making rats attracted to cat urine (see here) to improve reproduction chances.Indeed, in t........ Read more »

  • January 7, 2017
  • 04:15 AM
  • 302 views

ADHD and vitamin levels

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"ADHD [attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder] patients were overrepresented in the group with low levels of some vitamins, possibly indicative of inadequate dietary intake of these micronutrients in a subgroup of patients. It is important to identify these patients in dietary intervention trials of ADHD."So said the study findings reported by Elisabeth Toverud Landaas and colleagues [1] (open-access) providing some potentially important data on how nutritional factors might int........ Read more »

Landaas ET, Aarsland TI, Ulvik A, Halmøy A, Ueland PM, & Haavik J. (2016) Vitamin levels in adults with ADHD. BJPsych open, 2(6), 377-384. PMID: 27990293  

  • January 6, 2017
  • 07:02 AM
  • 247 views

White collar criminals, bad presentations, smartphones, and a salary  negotiation edge

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

It is very cold outdoors (even in Texas) and it is time once again for a number of important things we decided did not merit an entire post but wanted to share. Think of it as a series of holiday gifts for you… Ever wonder why white-collar criminals did what they did?  Wonder no more. […]... Read more »

Shaw, H., Ellis, D., Kendrick, L., Ziegler, F., & Wiseman, R. (2016) Predicting Smartphone Operating System from Personality and Individual Differences. Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, 19(12), 727-732. DOI: 10.1089/cyber.2016.0324  

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