Post List

  • November 4, 2010
  • 06:28 PM
  • 1,159 views

Why religious Austrians have more children

by Tom Rees in Epiphenom

On average, the more religious you are, the more kids you'll have. It's a widespread phenomenon, seen across pretty much all of the modern world.

The problem is, no-one really knows why this happens.

It could be something about religious beliefs. Maybe they make you more attractive to potential mates, or maybe they drive you to have more kids once you have found your mate.

Or maybe they encourage traditional, rather than modern, approaches to relationships. The traditional role for women is t........ Read more »

  • November 4, 2010
  • 03:21 PM
  • 917 views

First members of the ATLAS of lenses

by Emma in we are all in the gutter

Its been a good week for the Herschel-ATLAS survey that I work on – last Friday we released our first set of data to the public and this Friday we’re publishing some exciting results, led by Mattia Negrello from the Open University, on a new way to find cosmic lenses. Gravitational lensing occurs when light [...]... Read more »

Negrello, M., Hopwood, R., De Zotti, G., Cooray, A., Verma, A., Bock, J., Frayer, D., Gurwell, M., Omont, A., Neri, R.... (2010) The Detection of a Population of Submillimeter-Bright, Strongly Lensed Galaxies. Science, 330(6005), 800-804. DOI: 10.1126/science.1193420  

  • November 4, 2010
  • 03:06 PM
  • 1,169 views

Stress: Does Gender Matter?

by A. Goldstein in WiSci

According to the Anxiety Disorders Association of America, 40 million Americans suffer from anxiety disorders—over twice the number of people who suffer from alcoholism,1 and nearly three times the number who suffer from depression.2 Of these 40 million people, two-thirds are female. While culture and environment might play contributing roles, science suggests that women may [...]... Read more »

  • November 4, 2010
  • 02:59 PM
  • 1,298 views

Pitfalls in the Diagnosis of Adult ADHD

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

The diagnosis of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in adults poses a challenge for patients and clinicians alike.  Hyperactivity is a less prominent sign in adults with ADHD than in children.  Attention problems may be due to a variety of conditions.  A common mistake is for a diagnosis of ADHD to be made based on a scale assessing attention problems.   This is an inappropriate diagnostic strategy unless attention symptoms can be liked specifically to an ADHD and ........ Read more »

  • November 4, 2010
  • 02:16 PM
  • 1,316 views

Another Way Kickboxing is Good for the Heart

by Sanford- Burnham in Beaker


Dr. Barbara Ranscht is a neuroscientist. While studying brain development and cancer for more than 20 years, she has come to know a molecule called T-cadherin. This protein is anchored to the cell membrane, where it senses changes in the extracellular environment to ultimately regulate cellular motility and growth. T-cadherin has multiple functions in the [...]... Read more »

Denzel, M., Scimia, M., Zumstein, P., Walsh, K., Ruiz-Lozano, P., & Ranscht, B. (2010) T-cadherin is critical for adiponectin-mediated cardioprotection in mice. Journal of Clinical Investigation. DOI: 10.1172/JCI43464  

  • November 4, 2010
  • 02:10 PM
  • 1,527 views

Neurologists Take A Stand Against Concussions

by Brian Mossop in The Decision Tree

More and more young athletes are reporting symptoms of concussions at emergency rooms across the country. Now, the American Academy of Neuorlogists (AAN) have released formal guidelines that those suspected of suffering a concussion should not return to play until they are evaluated by a physician. As I reported at Wired Playbook, this is a [...]... Read more »

  • November 4, 2010
  • 01:00 PM
  • 2,715 views

One Symbiont Is Good, Two Are Better: The Forever Fascinating Story of the Leaf-Cutting Ants and Their Bacteria

by Moselio Schaechter in Small Things Considered

by Elio

Now here’s a question you’ve been asking all along about the interaction between the leaf cutting (Attine) ants, the fungi they cultivate, and the bacteria that make antifungals against unwanted fungal species. Have these bacteria evolved along with the ants to protect their gardens from unwanted "weeds," or do the ants pick up such bacteria from their environment? New data suggest both things happen.

To remind you, leaf-cutting ants practice fungiculture, and have been doing this ........ Read more »

  • November 4, 2010
  • 11:39 AM
  • 2,299 views

Teenage depression treatment: Medication, therapy or both? It may depend on marital conflict.

by Nestor Lopez-Duran PhD in Child-Psych

Recently I discussed a study that examined the rates of psychiatric conditions in children and adolescents. I mentioned how by age 18, about 16% of girls and 8% of boys will experience a depressive disorder (major depressive disorder or dysthymia). Depression is one of the most prevalent psychiatric conditions in adolescents and unfortunately it is [...]... Read more »

  • November 4, 2010
  • 11:27 AM
  • 1,700 views

Erotic Romance, Condoms, and Social Responsibility

by Livia Blackburne in A Brain Scientist's Take on Writing

Hey folks. Sorry for the sporadic posting lately. My writing time for the last two months has been tied up on a sekrit project. In true graduate student fashion, I attacked the project with some top sekrit procrastination, and things got pretty hectic towards the end. But that should be wrapping up soon.

But enough about me. Let's talk about something more interesting. Like erotic romance novels. And condoms. And of course, science.

Raymond Moore at On Fiction recently described a study abou........ Read more »

Diekman, A., McDonald, M., & Gardner, W. (2000) LOVE MEANS NEVER HAVING TO BE CAREFUL. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 24(2), 179-188. DOI: 10.1111/j.1471-6402.2000.tb00199.x  

  • November 4, 2010
  • 10:45 AM
  • 1,123 views

Brentuximab Vedotin (SGN-35) for Relapsed CD30-Positive Lymphomas

by Sally Church in Pharma Strategy Blog

This morning I was delighted to see that one of my favourite medical doctors on Twitter, Dr Anas Younes from MD Anderson, has published a paper in the New England Journal of Medicine on a clinical trial of a promising … Continue reading →... Read more »

Younes, A., Bartlett, N., Leonard, J., Kennedy, D., Lynch, C., Sievers, E., & Forero-Torres, A. (2010) Brentuximab Vedotin (SGN-35) for Relapsed CD30-Positive Lymphomas. New England Journal of Medicine, 363(19), 1812-1821. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1002965  

  • November 4, 2010
  • 10:35 AM
  • 727 views

So you think you know nothing about dance?

by Psychology 379 bloggers in Cognition & the Arts

Take a look at this contemporary dance choreographed by Mia Michaels and performed on the television show, So You Think You Can Dance… The dance starts at 1:15 sec.

After watching this video, do you know anything about contemporary dance? By simply watching this dance you have in fact unconsciously learned something about the sequencing of this dance. This happens for dancers and non-dancers alike. In a study by Opacic, Stevens and Tilmann, they explored this unconscious learning of s........ Read more »

Opacic, T., Stevens, C., & Tillmann, B. (2009) Unspoken knowledge: Implicit learning of structured human dance movement. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 35(6), 1570-1577. DOI: 10.1037/a0017244  

  • November 4, 2010
  • 10:15 AM
  • 940 views

Man Fingers and Neanderthals

by Brit Trogen in Science in Seconds

Finger length has always been a point of contention for me.

In the womb, finger development is affected by exposure to androgens like testosterone, high levels of which cause an increase in the length of the fourth finger (the ring finger) relative to the second finger (index). In other words, if your ring finger is longer than your index, you're basically a dude. ... Read more »

  • November 4, 2010
  • 10:14 AM
  • 2,095 views

C is for Cookie: Cookie Monster, Network Pressure, and Identity Formation

by Krystal D'Costa in Anthropology in Practice



Cookie Monster © Sesame Street
It’s not quite news that Cookie Monster no longer eats cookies. Well, he eats ONE cookie. After he fills up on vegetables! Vegetables!! Understandably, the public was outraged, and in response, Cookie felt the need to clarify: He still eats cookies—for dessert—but he likes fruit and vegetables too. Cookie Monster needed to reassert his identity, so he did what anyone would do: He interviewed with Matt Lauer.* The message was plain:He’s a Cookie Monster a........ Read more »

  • November 4, 2010
  • 10:05 AM
  • 1,205 views

Cretaceous Croc Bones Were Dinosaur Table Scraps

by Brian Switek in Dinosaur Tracking

The traditional, simplified recipe for how to make a fossil goes something like this: take a dead animal, keep it safe from scavengers, cover it up with sediment, add a heaping dollop of time and presto!, you have a petrified skeleton. The second step is often cited as being especially important—a skeleton can’t enter the [...]... Read more »

Lucas Ernesto Fiorelli. (2010) Predation bite-marks on a peirosaurid crocodyliform from the Upper Cretaceous of Neuquén Province, Argentina. Ameghiniana, 47(3). info:/

  • November 4, 2010
  • 09:37 AM
  • 1,228 views

The Science of Makeup

by Christie Wilcox in Observations of a Nerd

I couldn't help but be intrigued that my stiffest competition for winning the $10,000 Blogging Scholarship is a makeup blogger. What is it about cosmetics that is so appealing? Why do people wear makeup, and what might have caused early man to play around with blush and lipstick? Well, like everything else in life, a lot can be explained by science. Meanwhile, after you read this post, I encourage you to go vote for me whomever you think is the best blogger in the competition (PS I'm Christie Wi........ Read more »

Zilhao, J., Angelucci, D., Badal-Garcia, E., d'Errico, F., Daniel, F., Dayet, L., Douka, K., Higham, T., Martinez-Sanchez, M., Montes-Bernardez, R.... (2010) Symbolic use of marine shells and mineral pigments by Iberian Neandertals. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 107(3), 1023-1028. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0914088107  

Roberts, S., Havlicek, J., Flegr, J., Hruskova, M., Little, A., Jones, B., Perrett, D., & Petrie, M. (2004) Female facial attractiveness increases during the fertile phase of the menstrual cycle. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 271(Suppl_5). DOI: 10.1098/rsbl.2004.0174  

Mulhern, R., Fieldman, G., Hussey, T., Leveque, J., & Pineau, P. (2003) Do cosmetics enhance female Caucasian facial attractiveness?. International Journal of Cosmetic Science, 25(4), 199-205. DOI: 10.1046/j.1467-2494.2003.00188.x  

Nash, R., Fieldman, G., Hussey, T., Lévêque, J., & Pineau, P. (2006) Cosmetics: They Influence More Than Caucasian Female Facial Attractiveness. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 36(2), 493-504. DOI: 10.1111/j.0021-9029.2006.00016.x  

Nicolas Guéguen. (2008) Brief Report: The Effects of Women's Cosmeticson Men's Approach: An Evaluation in a Bar. North American Journal of Psychology, 10(1), 221-228. info:/

  • November 4, 2010
  • 09:37 AM
  • 1,364 views

The Science of Makeup [Observations of a Nerd]

by Christie Wilcox none@example.com in Food Matters

I couldn't help but be intrigued that my stiffest competition for winning the $10,000 Blogging Scholarship is a makeup blogger. What is it about cosmetics that is so appealing? Why do people wear makeup, and what might have caused early man to play around with blush and lipstick? Well, like everything else in life, a lot can be explained by science. Meanwhile, after you read this post, I encourage you to go vote for me whomever you think is the best blogger in the competition (PS I'm Christie Wi........ Read more »

Zilhao, J., Angelucci, D., Badal-Garcia, E., d'Errico, F., Daniel, F., Dayet, L., Douka, K., Higham, T., Martinez-Sanchez, M., Montes-Bernardez, R.... (2010) Symbolic use of marine shells and mineral pigments by Iberian Neandertals. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 107(3), 1023-1028. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0914088107  

Roberts, S., Havlicek, J., Flegr, J., Hruskova, M., Little, A., Jones, B., Perrett, D., & Petrie, M. (2004) Female facial attractiveness increases during the fertile phase of the menstrual cycle. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 271(Suppl_5). DOI: 10.1098/rsbl.2004.0174  

Mulhern, R., Fieldman, G., Hussey, T., Leveque, J., & Pineau, P. (2003) Do cosmetics enhance female Caucasian facial attractiveness?. International Journal of Cosmetic Science, 25(4), 199-205. DOI: 10.1046/j.1467-2494.2003.00188.x  

Nash, R., Fieldman, G., Hussey, T., Lévêque, J., & Pineau, P. (2006) Cosmetics: They Influence More Than Caucasian Female Facial Attractiveness. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 36(2), 493-504. DOI: 10.1111/j.0021-9029.2006.00016.x  

Nicolas Guéguen. (2008) Brief Report: The Effects of Women's Cosmeticson Men's Approach: An Evaluation in a Bar. North American Journal of Psychology, 10(1), 221-228. info:/

  • November 4, 2010
  • 09:16 AM
  • 904 views

Did You Cut Your Hair?

by APS Daily Observations in Daily Observations

“Hey! You look different! Did you cut your hair?”
When we change our appearance, for example, by getting a haircut, friends will often note that we look different, but they may ... Read more »

  • November 4, 2010
  • 08:00 AM
  • 2,510 views

How Obesity Affects Your Liver

by Arya M. Sharma in Dr. Sharma's Obesity Notes

Obesity is rapidly overtaking alcohol as one of the major causes of fatty liver disease.
The term non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is now widely used to describe hepatic steatosis resulting from excess weight in the absence of a history of significant alcohol use or other known liver diseases.
Already NAFLD is one of the most common [...]... Read more »

  • November 4, 2010
  • 06:41 AM
  • 1,117 views

Mutation rates in man and virus

by iayork in Mystery Rays from Outer Space

John Hawks1 has a long and very interesting post on the human mutation rate — not just the actual number (which turns out to be less well documented and much more slippery than I had realized), but the techniques used to calculate the rate, and difficulties therein. So much of the literature in this area [...]... Read more »

  • November 4, 2010
  • 05:42 AM
  • 1,917 views

Markets and on farm conservation: it’s complicated

by Jeremy in Agricultural Biodiversity Weblog

Eating blue tortilla chips during a recent visit to the US reminded me that I had intended to blog about a paper just out in the Journal of Latin American Geography. Entitled “Specialty maize varieties in Mexico: A case study in market-driven agro-biodiversity conservation,” it looks in detail at the economics of growing blue and [...]... Read more »

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