Post List

  • October 25, 2010
  • 10:49 AM
  • 1,232 views

Robot Lizard Push-ups

by Jason Goldman in The Thoughtful Animal

Have you ever been walking through the forest and thought to yourself, "Damn, its loud here...it's really, really hard to hear anything anybody else is saying"? Well, maybe that's what prompted Terry J. Ord and Judy A. Stamps, respectively from Harvard and UC Davis to investigate lizard exercise routines.

You ask: What do lizard calisthenics and communication have in common? Patience, grasshopper.

Dinosaurs also might have survived if they weren't eaten by giant snakes.


A noisy environment m........ Read more »

Ord TJ, & Stamps JA. (2008) Alert signals enhance animal communication in "noisy" environments. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 105(48), 18830-5. PMID: 19033197  

  • October 25, 2010
  • 10:42 AM
  • 806 views

Fins to limbs and beyond

by miko in Reaction Norm

Last week I wrote about an important constraint on phenotypic variation—the dependence of chromosomal position on recombination rates. This type of “genomic constraint” is a relatively recently recognized phenomenon, but constraints on variation have been noted for a long time. Developmental constraints are perhaps the most intuitive. For example, beyond engineering considerations, a winged horse [...]... Read more »

  • October 25, 2010
  • 10:30 AM
  • 647 views

The Science of Catching: Those Good Vibrations

by Psychology 379 bloggers in Cognition & the Arts

I’m no Randy Moss, and as klutzy and uncoordinated as I am it was always a surprising miracle in high school when I managed to actually catch that football. When you really consider it, the simple ability to catch something out of the air at all is a pretty spectacular feat involving an incredible amount of sensory information and nearly instantaneous processing, and particularly during high-speed athletic events it can be difficult to comprehend how our visual systems manage to keep up. M........ Read more »

Bastin, J., Calvin, S., & Montagne, G. (2006) Muscular Proprioception Contributes to the Control of Interceptive Actions. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 32(4), 964-972. DOI: 10.1037/0096-1523.32.4.964  

  • October 25, 2010
  • 09:41 AM
  • 612 views

How Much do You Confide in Friends?

by APS Daily Observations in Daily Observations

In the United States, friends often share intimate details of their lives and problems, but in Japan this degree of self-disclosure between friends is much less common. A new study ... Read more »

  • October 25, 2010
  • 08:48 AM
  • 1,321 views

50% Lower cal MIXED carb with Moderate Protein better than Higher Carb alone for Endurance

by mc in begin to dig (b2d)

Want to stay out on your bike longer? There's a nice new study that has entered the energy drink fray, returning to the question of what's a ratio of protein to carbs that's optimal? In this case one measure of optimal is Time to Exhaustion or TTE. Also checked is optimal for what level of effort (below or near ventilatory threshold or VT). Turns out that half the calories (of the right blend of... Read more »

Ferguson-Stegall L, McCleave EL, Ding Z, Kammer LM, Wang B, Doerner PG, Liu Y, & Ivy JL. (2010) The effect of a low carbohydrate beverage with added protein on cycling endurance performance in trained athletes. Journal of strength and conditioning research / National Strength , 24(10), 2577-86. PMID: 20733521  

Martínez-Lagunas V, Ding Z, Bernard JR, Wang B, & Ivy JL. (2010) Added protein maintains efficacy of a low-carbohydrate sports drink. Journal of strength and conditioning research / National Strength , 24(1), 48-59. PMID: 19924010  

  • October 25, 2010
  • 08:46 AM
  • 1,293 views

50% Lower cal MIXED carb with Moderate Protein better than Higher Carb alone for Greater Endurance

by mc in begin to dig (b2d)

Want to stay out on your bike longer? There's a nice new study that has entered the energy drink fray, returning to the question of what's a ratio of protein to carbs that's optimal? In this case one measure of optimal is Time to Exhaustion or TTE. Also checked is optimal for what level of effort (below or near ventilatory threshold or VT). Turns out that half the calories (of the right blend of carb types with protein) can give greater, go longer, harder results.

The authors of this study man........ Read more »

Ferguson-Stegall L, McCleave EL, Ding Z, Kammer LM, Wang B, Doerner PG, Liu Y, & Ivy JL. (2010) The effect of a low carbohydrate beverage with added protein on cycling endurance performance in trained athletes. Journal of strength and conditioning research / National Strength , 24(10), 2577-86. PMID: 20733521  

Martínez-Lagunas V, Ding Z, Bernard JR, Wang B, & Ivy JL. (2010) Added protein maintains efficacy of a low-carbohydrate sports drink. Journal of strength and conditioning research / National Strength , 24(1), 48-59. PMID: 19924010  

  • October 25, 2010
  • 08:24 AM
  • 671 views

Hard to be a woman? The beat goes on….

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

If you like to keep track of such things, we’ve written a number of times on how it’s hard to be a woman. Tammy Wynette did the original (although it’s better if you don’t listen to the lyrics too closely) and the hits just keep on coming! You may remember the controversy around Clarence Thomas’ [...]

Related posts:Redux: Sometimes it’s hard to be a woman (with appreciation to Tammy Wynette, Linda Ronstadt and Anne Reed)

“I didn’t know truth had ........ Read more »

  • October 25, 2010
  • 08:04 AM
  • 1,288 views

Meteorite tea, and the failures of genius

by Lab Lemming in Lounge of the Lab Lemming

In the early 1970’s, Io, the innermost large moon of Jupiter, was somewhat of an enigma. Unlike Europa and Ganymede, it did not exhibit water ice adsorption bands it its IR spectra. Its density suggested that it was a rock and metal planet, but the surface reflectance was unlike anything known to science. This problem was addressed brilliantly in a Science paper by Fanale, Johnson, and Matson,... Read more »

Fanale, F., Johnson, T., & Matson, D. (1974) Io: A Surface Evaporite Deposit?. Science, 186(4167), 922-925. DOI: 10.1126/science.186.4167.922  

  • October 25, 2010
  • 08:00 AM
  • 1,237 views

Free Will is NOT An Illusion

by Shaheen Lakhan in Brain Blogger

Many scientists think that free-will is an illusion. That is, intentions, choices, and decisions are made by subconscious mind, which only lets the conscious mind know what was willed after the fact. This argument was promoted long ago by scholars like Darwin, Huxley, and Einstein. Many modern scientists also hold that position and have even [...]... Read more »

  • October 25, 2010
  • 07:51 AM
  • 674 views

Feed me, Seymour

by Becky in It Takes 30

The diversity of life is a puzzle for ecologists and evolutionary biologists.  The principle of competitive exclusion suggests that if two species are competing for the same resource, one of them should eventually win and the other should become extinct.  So if you have n different food sources, you should end up with (at most) [...]... Read more »

Jennings DE, Krupa JJ, Raffel TR, & Rohr JR. (2010) Evidence for competition between carnivorous plants and spiders. Proceedings. Biological sciences / The Royal Society, 277(1696), 3001-8. PMID: 20462904  

  • October 25, 2010
  • 06:36 AM
  • 1,171 views

Body odor, Asians, and earwax

by Razib Khan in Gene Expression

When I was in college I would sometimes have late night conversations with the guys in my dorm, and the discussion would random-walk in very strange directions. During one of these quasi-salons a friend whose parents were from Korea expressed some surprise and disgust at the idea of wet earwax. It turns out he had [...]... Read more »

  • October 25, 2010
  • 06:23 AM
  • 1,217 views

Supply Chain Crisis Management

by Daniel Dumke in SCRM Blog - Supply Chain Risk Management


Supply Chain Risk Management is one way to look at risks within a company (and beyond). But there are broader and more narrow disciplines as well, with Business Continuity on the one end and Supply Chain Crisis Management on the other.

I wanted to get an overview of current research on Supply Chain Crisis Management first, so today I explore "Managing supply chains in times of crisis: a review of literature and insights" by Natarajarathinam, Capar and Narayanan. The article is focussed on ........ Read more »

Natarajarathinam, M., Capar, I., & Narayanan, A. (2009) Managing supply chains in times of crisis: a review of literature and insights. International Journal of Physical Distribution , 39(7), 535-573. DOI: 10.1108/09600030910996251  

  • October 25, 2010
  • 06:00 AM
  • 828 views

Article review: EM in medical schools

by Michelle Lin in Academic Life In Emergency Medicine

Similar to JAMA, which publishes an annual publication focusing on Medical Education, the Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) journal just published a AEM-CORD supplement focusing on EM education. I was fortunate to be involved with one of the papers published in this supplement.This paper, written on behalf of the Clerkship Directors in EM (CDEM) and the Association of Academic Chairs of EM (AACEM), reviews the past, present, and future of EM in the U.S. medical school curriculum.EM faculty membe........ Read more »

Wald, D., Lin, M., Manthey, D., Rogers, R., Zun, L., & Christopher, T. (2010) Emergency Medicine in the Medical School Curriculum. Academic Emergency Medicine. DOI: 10.1111/j.1553-2712.2010.00896.x  

  • October 25, 2010
  • 05:32 AM
  • 1,517 views

'Don't do it!' - how your inner voice really does aid self-control

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

As you stretch for yet another delicious cup cake, the abstemious little voice in your head pleads 'Don't do it!'. Does this self talk really have any effect on your impulse control or is it merely providing a private commentary on your mental life? A new study using a laboratory test of self-control suggests that the inner voice really does help.

Alexa Tullett and Michael Inzlicht had 37 undergrads perform the Go/No Go task. Briefly, this involved one on-screen symbol indicating that a button ........ Read more »

  • October 25, 2010
  • 04:28 AM
  • 1,035 views

The brain creates something out of nothing

by Björn Brembs in bjoern.brembs.blog

Brains are what mathematicians call "information sources". At least this is one of the results of a set of elaborate experiments together with sophisticated analyses and computations reported in the current issue of Nature Neuroscience (subscription required). The article, entitled "Intrinsic biophysical diversity decorrelates neuronal firing while increasing information content", studies a set of neurons in the brain's main olfactory center, the olfactory bulb. These ne........ Read more »

  • October 25, 2010
  • 04:21 AM
  • 1,662 views

Racial Differences in the Concept of Beauty

by Psychothalamus in Psychothalamus

Are average composite faces the most attractive faces or are highly attractive faces markedly different from average faces? Rhee & Lee (2010) agrees with Perrett & Yoshikawa (1994) that the most attractive face is actually the average of attractive faces and that an average face; while attractive, is not the most attractive.They also argue that previous concepts of beauty such as the divine proportion (golden ratio) are not a good measure of beauty across different races and should not b........ Read more »

Rhee SC, & Lee SH. (2010) Attractive Composite Faces of Different Races. Aesthetic plastic surgery. PMID: 20953953  

Perrett DI, May KA, & Yoshikawa S. (1994) Facial shape and judgements of female attractiveness. Nature, 368(6468), 239-42. PMID: 8145822  

  • October 25, 2010
  • 03:55 AM
  • 1,569 views

A nanomedicine approach for ocular neuroprotection in glaucoma

by Michael Berger in nanowerk

Medical researchers believe that the best way to protect eye from glaucoma is to protect the optic nerve from a sudden increase in intraocular pressure since ocular hypertension is the most important risk factor for glaucoma. Accordingly, for the past few years, huge research efforts have been made to develop a powerful biotechnical approach to protect the optic nerve. As a result, scientists discovered that Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) can be a new powerful modality for the protection of optic ne........ Read more »

  • October 25, 2010
  • 02:09 AM
  • 1,713 views

What Do Med Students Think About the Dangers of Facebook?

by Dr Shock in Dr Shock MD PhD


A lot his been written on this blog about medical professionalism and online social networks such as Facebook. There’s a lack of policies on Internet use for many med schools. In short, on social networking sites patients may learn information about their doctors or medical students that compromises the professional relationship. Threats to patient confidentiality [...]


Related posts:Med Schools lack of policies for facebook and twitter use
Facebook and Professionalism
The Dangers of Fa........ Read more »

  • October 25, 2010
  • 02:07 AM
  • 665 views

The Bobo Doll Experiment

by John Wayland in The Darwin Tribune

Social psychology is a fascinating area of psychological research.One of the many famous pieces of research to come out in the history of social psychology is the Bobo Doll Experiment, conducted by Albert Bandura. Essentially, Philips (2007) states that Bandura showed children images of either an actor attacking a clown, or not. After watching the film, the children were then allowed to play in a room full of toys. Philips (2007) states that those children who had watched the film would go on to........ Read more »

Bandura, A., Ross, D., & Ross, S. (1963) Imitation of film-mediated aggressive models. The Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, 66(1), 3-11. DOI: 10.1037/h0048687  

Bandura, A. (2009) Social Cognitive Theory Goes Global. The Psychologist, 22(6), 504-506. info:/

PHILLIPS, H. (2007) Mind-altering media. The New Scientist, 194(2600), 33-37. DOI: 10.1016/S0262-4079(07)61000-8  

  • October 25, 2010
  • 01:16 AM
  • 1,098 views

Parametric Bootstrap Power Analysis of GISS Temp Data

by apeescape in mind of a Markov chain

Previosly, I calculated a bunch of ad-hoc power curves from GISTEMP data. Power is essentially a reframing of the p-value, to see the significance of the trend lines in the global temps. However, power calculations are inherently very noisy, hence, my ad-hoc way of aggregating the data. Another method is to bootstrap through the responses [...]... Read more »

Gerard, P., Smith, D., & Weerakkody, G. (1998) Limits of Retrospective Power Analysis. The Journal of Wildlife Management, 62(2), 801. DOI: 10.2307/3802357  

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