Post List

  • November 22, 2010
  • 01:27 PM
  • 1,522 views

Frank Fenner, MD, 1914-2010

by Vincent Racaniello in virology blog

Australian virologist Frank Fenner, MD was born in Ballarat, Victoria in 1914. He earned a Doctor of Medicine in 1942 at the University of Adelaide, and from 1940 – 1946 he worked on the malaria parasite in Egypt and Papua New Guinea as an officer in the Australian Army Medical Corps. He subsequently began studying the [...]... Read more »

  • November 22, 2010
  • 01:07 PM
  • 1,511 views

Playing with cars - can crows make their own roadkill?

by davesbrain in Dave Hubble's ecology spot

It is well known that carrion crows (Corvus corone) frequently feed from roadkill. As they lack a bill specialised for tearing into flesh, they may need a carcass to be opened by another animal before being able to scavenge – a job done very effectively by the impact of a vehicle.In Japan, they have been seen to use cars to crack walnuts, placing them on pedestrian crossings when the traffic stops, and after traffic has passed, waiting for the lights to change again in order to collect the ope........ Read more »

  • November 22, 2010
  • 11:52 AM
  • 859 views

Stepping in a Pile of…New Genomic Data

by Rob Mitchum in ScienceLife

Genomic sequencing has made incredible strides in recent years, with both the cost and the time required to sequence an individual’s entire DNA sequence dropping meteorically. Yet one rate-limiting step for securing an organism’s genome remains: in order to sequence a species’ genetic information, you need a sample to start with. In humans or laboratory [...]... Read more »

  • November 22, 2010
  • 11:11 AM
  • 1,119 views

Is “Bottom Up” Science Possible?

by Jörg Friedrich in Reading Nature

Research projects waste millions or billions of euros, so is it conceivable and possible for amateurs to operate serious scientific research in their garage or at their home desk? Can you imagine that individual amateur scientists or small groups of … Continue reading →... Read more »

Ledford H. (2010) Garage biotech: Life hackers. Nature, 467(7316), 650-2. PMID: 20930820  

Nature Editorial. (2010) Garage biology. Nature, 467(7316), 634. PMID: 20930797  

  • November 22, 2010
  • 11:01 AM
  • 1,094 views

Stressing Motherhood: A primatologist discovers the social factors responsible for maternal infanticide. (Scientific American)

by Eric Michael Johnson in The Primate Diaries

The latest stop in the #PDEx tour is being hosted by Scientific American:Throughout history, from the fictional Medea to the tragic reports of modern times, women have taken the lives of their children under a variety of contexts, whether it is to punish the father, escape from the burden of motherhood, or even to protect a child from what they perceive as a fate worse than death. In this regard humans share yet another feature, albeit a tragic one, with nonhuman animals since females in a varie........ Read more »

  • November 22, 2010
  • 11:01 AM
  • 884 views

Stressing Motherhood: A primatologist discovers the social factors responsible for maternal infanticide. (Scientific American)

by Eric Michael Johnson in The Primate Diaries in Exile

The latest stop in the #PDEx tour is being hosted by Scientific American:Throughout history, from the fictional Medea to the tragic reports of modern times, women have taken the lives of their children under a variety of contexts, whether it is to punish the father, escape from the burden of motherhood, or even to protect a child from what they perceive as a fate worse than death. In this regard humans share yet another feature, albeit a tragic one, with nonhuman animals since females in a varie........ Read more »

  • November 22, 2010
  • 10:46 AM
  • 1,326 views

Research – The World’s Smallest Water Bottle (Literally)

by Paul Vallett in Electron Cafe

How small is the world’s smallest water bottle? Well, imagine a water bottle that can only hold a single water molecule. As ridiculous as it sounds that’s what a group in Beijing has been able to achieve. They were able to use a modified carbon cage, commonly known as a buckyball, as the bottle to [...]... Read more »

Zhang, Q., Pankewitz, T., Liu, S., Klopper, W., & Gan, L. (2010) Switchable Open-Cage Fullerene for Water Encapsulation. Angewandte Chemie International Edition. DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004879  

  • November 22, 2010
  • 10:32 AM
  • 999 views

Koreaceratops—A Swimming Ceratopsian?

by Brian Switek in Dinosaur Tracking

Hot on the heels of a team of researchers who described Zhuchengceratops from the Cretaceous of China, paleontologists Yuong-Nam Lee, Michael J. Ryan and Yoshitsugu Kobayashi have just announced the discovery of another ceratopsian dinosaur—Koreaceratops hwaseongensis—from the 103-million-year-old rock of South Korea. It is the first dinosaur of its kind to be found in the [...]... Read more »

  • November 22, 2010
  • 09:36 AM
  • 870 views

Run For Your Life! Detecting Living and Nonliving Threats

by APS Daily Observations in Daily Observations

It is important to be able to quickly detect threats in the environment, but how clear and detailed do dangerous stimuli need to be for us to avoid them?
Also, do ... Read more »

Mermillod, M., Droit-Volet S., Devaux, D., Schaefer, A., & Vermeulen, N. (2010) Are coarse scales sufficient for fast detection of visual threat?. Psychological science : a journal of the American Psychological Society / APS. PMID: 20817781  

  • November 22, 2010
  • 09:27 AM
  • 1,598 views

roger penrose hunts for traces of other big bangs

by Greg Fish in weird things

Inflationary cosmology, which is the current model of how physics sees space and time, gets pretty tangled in how it describes the Big Bang and its immediate after-effects. All sorts of odd quantum states, asymmetries, and exotic particles had to come into existence after a violent event that carved out an ever-expanding bubble of space, [...]... Read more »

  • November 22, 2010
  • 09:13 AM
  • 1,048 views

DNA methylation and microRNA expression in pancreatic cancer

by Sally Church in Pharma Strategy Blog

Pancreatic cancer is particularly nasty, mainly because there is no easy way to detect it by screening or biomarkers in the general population, symptoms are often insidious and thus the cancer is sadly not picked up until the advanced stages. … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • November 22, 2010
  • 08:57 AM
  • 1,068 views

A step towards treating advanced cancer

by Cancer Research UK in Cancer Research UK - Science Update

Cancer is a challenging yet fascinating problem for researchers all over the world. And a new paper from US researchers, looking at a way to treat cancer that has spread, shows just how surprising cancer research can be. The research, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), shows that an antibody [...]... Read more »

DeLisser, H., Liu, Y., Desprez, P., Thor, A., Briasouli, P., Handumrongkul, C., Wilfong, J., Yount, G., Nosrati, M., Fong, S.... (2010) Vascular endothelial platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1) regulates advanced metastatic progression. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 107(43), 18616-18621. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1004654107  

  • November 22, 2010
  • 08:55 AM
  • 1,158 views

The Blood of Louis XVI

by Terri Sundquist in Promega Connections

A bloody handkerchief stored in an ornately decorated gourd seems like a gruesome keepsake, but that is exactly what scientists are using to obtain the presumptive genetic profile of King Louis XVI of France. “Who would want such an odd souvenir?” you might ask. Well, apparently a bloody handkerchief was a perfectly acceptable memento from [...]... Read more »

Carles Lalueza-Fox, Elena Gigli, Carla Bini, Francesc Calafell, Donata Luiselli, Susi Pelotti, Davide Pettener. (2010) Genetic analysis of the presumptive blood from Louis XVI, king of France. Forensic Science International: Genetics. info:/doi:10.1016/j.fsigen.2010.09.007

  • November 22, 2010
  • 08:43 AM
  • 750 views

Setting the Mood for a Scare

by Psychology 379 bloggers in Cognition & the Arts

Although it lacks the iconic status of Marion Crane’s murder in the shower, the scene in which Detective Arbogast goes to investigate the Bates’ mansion is my favorite part of Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho. Much of my enjoyment of horror films is derived from the thrill of a good scare, and this scene delivered the desired jolt when I saw the movie for the first time. I remember the sense of foreboding I felt as I watched those tense, unsettling shots of Arbogast walking up the s........ Read more »

ROY, M., MAILHOT, J., GOSSELIN, N., PAQUETTE, S., & PERETZ, I. (2009) Modulation of the startle reflex by pleasant and unpleasant music. International Journal of Psychophysiology, 71(1), 37-42. DOI: 10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2008.07.010  

  • November 22, 2010
  • 07:47 AM
  • 1,151 views

Measuring Supply Chain Performance

by Daniel Dumke in SCRM Blog - Supply Chain Risk Management


Last week I conducted another Interview for the empirical part of my research. And we also discussed how to measure performance within the SC. As it turns out, multiple measures, namely service, cost, working capital are used. Sadly in literature many authors still focus on a single measure only and I wanted to know more about it. So I read an article by B. Beamon (Measuring Supply Chain Performance) to get an overview over performance measures used and how to select the right one(s).

Hist........ Read more »

Beamon, B. (1999) Measuring supply chain performance. International Journal of Operations , 19(3), 275-292. DOI: 10.1108/01443579910249714  

  • November 22, 2010
  • 07:11 AM
  • 1,171 views

Shock result! Asking children and teenagers to promise to tell the truth actually works

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

When teenagers are asked to provide testimonies for use in court, how do you increase the likelihood that they'll tell the truth? It may sound twee, but a North American study claims that merely asking them to promise to tell the truth can be surprisingly effective.

Angela Evans and Kang Lee had just over one hundred 8- to 16-year-olds complete a 10-item trivia test, which unbeknown to the youngsters featured two impossible questions ('Who invented the hair brush?' and 'Who discovered Tunisia?'........ Read more »

  • November 22, 2010
  • 07:00 AM
  • 1,803 views

Trends and Outcomes of Adolescent Bariatric Surgery

by Arya M. Sharma in Dr. Sharma's Obesity Notes

Regular readers of these pages will probably be as depressed as I am to see the increasing need for discussing bariatric surgery in kids and adolescents.
Our evident failure to make any discernible headway in preventing childhood obesity has resulted in an increasing number of youth, who are now so severely obese that bariatric surgery often [...]... Read more »

Jen HC, Rickard DG, Shew SB, Maggard MA, Slusser WM, Dutson EP, & DeUgarte DA. (2010) Trends and outcomes of adolescent bariatric surgery in California, 2005-2007. Pediatrics, 126(4). PMID: 20855388  

  • November 22, 2010
  • 07:00 AM
  • 644 views

November 22, 2010

by Erin Campbell in HighMag Blog

As cold and flu season rears its ugly head, it’s time for us to appreciate our immune systems and thank the researchers the help us understand it. Today’s image is a double-whammy—a cool microscopy technique and great science. ... Read more »

  • November 22, 2010
  • 07:00 AM
  • 715 views

Big Pterosaurs Really Did Fly: Interview with Mark Witton Part II

by Andrew Farke in The Open Source Paleontologist

A new paper in PLoS ONE, by Mark Witton and Mike Habib, re-evaluates claims that big pterosaurs were too big to fly. To make a long story short, multiple lines of evidence suggest that giants like Quetzalcoatlus really did take wing! One of my previous blog posts summarized the paper and featured the first part of an interview with senior author Mark Witton. That part of the interview focused on many of the scientific aspects of the research. Today, we'll highlight some of the other highlights. ........ Read more »

  • November 22, 2010
  • 05:42 AM
  • 1,358 views

Pouches, pockets and sacks in the heads, necks and chests of mammals, part V: palatal (and other) pouches in camels and gazelles

by Darren Naish in Tetrapod Zoology

Everybody knows that camels are weird. As you'll know if you've been keeping an eye on SV-POW! lately, we've recently been quite taken with their necks. But it's not just camel's necks that are weird. Here, we embark on another look at the sometimes bizarre pouches, pockets and sacs present in certain mammals, most of which are outgrowths of the respiratory system.





Relatively little known is that (some) camels possess an inflatable diverticulum on the palate, termed the dhula, dulaa, gulah,........ Read more »

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