Post List

  • December 15, 2014
  • 08:42 AM
  • 84 views

Who is Getting High in Europe (and Where)?

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

My research training is in psychiatric epidemiology. Alcohol and drug dependence have been two of my topic areas of research.So I found a recent novel study of the epidemiology of illicit drug use in Europe intriguing.Typical methods of looking for the prevalence of drug use in populations are direct diagnostic interviews and studies of emergency room attendees or autopsy cases with medical complications of drug use.However, Christopher Ort from Switzerland along with a host of European col........ Read more »

Ort C, van Nuijs AL, Berset JD, Bijlsma L, Castiglioni S, Covaci A, de Voogt P, Emke E, Fatta-Kassinos D, Griffiths P.... (2014) Spatial differences and temporal changes in illicit drug use in Europe quantified by wastewater analysis. Addiction (Abingdon, England), 109(8), 1338-52. PMID: 24861844  

  • December 15, 2014
  • 07:49 AM
  • 86 views

Want to learn something better? Draw it

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

When you're trying to learn, do something with your new knowledge, such as summarising it or explaining it to someone else. This deepens your memories and helps integrate what you've learned with what you already knew. A new study has tested the benefits of another beneficial learning activity - drawing.Annett Schmeck and her team asked 48 German school-kids (average age 14) to read a 850-word passage about the biology of influenza, broken down into seven paragraphs. This was an unfamiliar topic........ Read more »

  • December 15, 2014
  • 07:15 AM
  • 81 views

Why do friendly people usually lead happier lives?

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

High scorers on the personality trait of agreeableness are eager to please, concerned for others, and compliant to other perspectives. On average, they live happier lives too. A new study suggests a possible reason: when they have the chance, friendly people tend to avoid engaging with negative things.The researchers, Konrad Bresin and Michael Robinson, began by asking participants to view a series of positive and negative images, spending as much time as they wanted on each one. Most people lin........ Read more »

  • December 15, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 74 views

Are you a murdered white female? Here is some small comfort!

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

We are again honored by our inclusion in the ABA Blawg 100 list for 2014. If you value this blog, please take a moment to vote for us here in the Litigation Category. Voting closes on December 19, 2014. Doug and Rita If you are a murdered white female, your case will be investigated and […]

Related posts:
Does your capital client “look deathworthy”?
Does the Prosecution want African-American jurors for the Trayvon Martin case?
Bev Kearney: Is it because I’m female, African-America........ Read more »

Pierce, G., Radelet, M., Posick, C., & Lyman, T. (2014) Race and the Construction of Evidence in Homicide Cases. American Journal of Criminal Justice, 39(4), 771-786. DOI: 10.1007/s12103-014-9259-1  

  • December 15, 2014
  • 07:00 AM
  • 65 views

The Paradoxical Shrinking Frog

by beredim in Strange Animals



Pseudis paradoxa in a pond
Credit: Mauricio Rivera Correa

Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Amphibia
Order: Anura
Family: Hylidae
Genus: Pseudis
Species: Pseudis paradoxa
Common Name(s): Paradoxical frog or Shrinking frog
Conservation Status: Least Concern (Not Threatened)

Looks like a pretty much regular frog, doesn't it? Well.. it's not! Meet P. paradoxa, a frog that grows down ... Read more »

  • December 15, 2014
  • 05:45 AM
  • 50 views

Malocclusion, orthodontics and quality of life

by Kevin OBrien in Kevin OBrien's Orthodontic Blog

Malocclusion, orthodontics and quality of life? One of the most important areas of orthodontic research that needs to be carried out is to clearly identify the effects of treatment. I have highlighted this in previous posts on the “the great unanswered questions” and “papers that have influenced me”. When we consider this area, I feel […]
The post Malocclusion, orthodontics and quality of life appeared first on Kevin O'Brien's Orthodontic Blog.
... Read more »

  • December 15, 2014
  • 04:45 AM
  • 64 views

Rates of medical illnesses in bipolar disorder

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I've mentioned a few times on this blog that a diagnosis of autism or autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is by no means protective against any other diagnosis being received, be it based on a somatic illness or condition, or something more behaviourally defined.Reading through the paper by Liz Forty and colleagues [1] (open-access) it appears that a similar scenario might also pertain to other behaviourally-defined conditions as per the example of bipolar disorder (BD) and their conclusion: "Bi........ Read more »

Forty L, Ulanova A, Jones L, Jones I, Gordon-Smith K, Fraser C, Farmer A, McGuffin P, Lewis CM, Hosang GM.... (2014) Comorbid medical illness in bipolar disorder. The British journal of psychiatry : the journal of mental science. PMID: 25359927  

  • December 15, 2014
  • 04:11 AM
  • 71 views

Electrogenic fish – what’s in charge of the charge?

by Kathrin Garschall in genome ecology evolution etc

Electric organs – organs that are capable of creating and discharging electricity – have evolved independently in at least six different lineages of fish (Torpediniformes, Rajiformes, Mormyroidea, Euteleostei, Siluriformes, Gymnotiformes) and play an important role in communication, navigation, defense and … Continue reading →... Read more »

Gallant, J., Traeger, L., Volkening, J., Moffett, H., Chen, P., Novina, C., Phillips, G., Anand, R., Wells, G., Pinch, M.... (2014) Genomic basis for the convergent evolution of electric organs. Science, 344(6191), 1522-1525. DOI: 10.1126/science.1254432  

  • December 15, 2014
  • 02:39 AM
  • 79 views

Transcription caught on camera part 1: Halo transcription factors

by Gal Haimovich in Green Fluorescent Blog

Transcription factors (TFs) have a fundamental role is regulating gene expression. The basic model, based on numerous biochemical analyses, have determined where TFs bind (usually at specific sites at or near promoters), when they bind the DNA (at a resolution … Continue reading →... Read more »

Chen J, Zhang Z, Li L, Chen BC, Revyakin A, Hajj B, Legant W, Dahan M, Lionnet T, Betzig E.... (2014) Single-molecule dynamics of enhanceosome assembly in embryonic stem cells. Cell, 156(6), 1274-85. PMID: 24630727  

  • December 15, 2014
  • 02:31 AM
  • 63 views

Treatment for Elderly with Breast Cancer May Not Be as Effective

by Wiley Asia Blog in Wiley Asia Blog - Health Sciences

A new analysis has found that while clinical trial data support omitting radiation treatments in elderly women with early stage breast cancer, nearly two-thirds of these women continue to receive it. The findings are published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society.

Results published in 2004 from a large, randomized clinical trial showed that adding radiation therapy to surgery plus tamoxifen does not reduce 5-year recurrence rates or prolong survival i........ Read more »

  • December 15, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 51 views

Returning to play in the same season following a traumatic shoulder dislocation or subluxation. Is it worth the risk?

by Catherine E. Lewis and Adam B. Rosen, PhD, ATC in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Returning the same season from a traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation or subluxation likely results in additional episodes of instability even after undergoing a strengthening and stability protocol. Self-report questionnaires immediately after initial injury may be useful in determining a return to play timeline.... Read more »

Dickens, J., Owens, B., Cameron, K., Kilcoyne, K., Allred, C., Svoboda, S., Sullivan, R., Tokish, J., Peck, K., & Rue, J. (2014) Return to Play and Recurrent Instability After In-Season Anterior Shoulder Instability: A Prospective Multicenter Study. The American Journal of Sports Medicine, 42(12), 2842-2850. DOI: 10.1177/0363546514553181  

  • December 14, 2014
  • 01:28 PM
  • 83 views

Scientists find a drug (currently used) to turn white fat to brown

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

It seems like we’ve been on a weight loss campaign here at the labs, but there just has been so much new and interesting research on the subject to report on, this is no exception. Researchers have uncovered the mechanism by which white fat cells from humans (an important distinction) gets reprogrammed to become browner.... Read more »

Anne Loft, Isabel Forss, Majken Storm Siersbæk, Søren Fisker Schmidt, Ann-Sofie Bøgh Larsen, Jesper Grud Skat Madsen, Didier F. Pisani, Ronni Nielsen, Mads Malik Aagaard, Angela Mathison.... (2014) Browning of human adipocytes requires KLF11 and reprogramming of PPARγ superenhancers. Genes . info:/10.1101/gad.250829.114

  • December 14, 2014
  • 12:47 PM
  • 72 views

Sulfur hydride blows away previous critical temperature limits for conventional superconductivity

by Jonathan Trinastic in Goodnight Earth

Researchers at Max Planck have revived interest in conventional BCS superconductivity after finding a zero resistance phase of H2S at 190 K!... Read more »

A. P. Drozdov, M. I. Eremets, & I. A. Troyan. (2014) Conventional superconductivity at 190 K at high pressures. arXiv. arXiv: 1412.0460v1

  • December 14, 2014
  • 07:57 AM
  • 72 views

Increasing Rigor in Huntington’s Disease Research

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

The CHDI Foundation, a charitable organization who fund a lot of research into Huntington's disease, are interested in reforming the scientific process.


The story comes from a paper written by British neuroscientist Marcus Munafo and colleagues (the authors including CHDI staff) published in Nature Biotechnology a couple of months ago: Scientific rigor and the art of motorcycle maintenance.



Munafo et al. begin by pointing to the history of car manufacturing as an analogy for the scie... Read more »

Munafo M, Noble S, Browne WJ, Brunner D, Button K, Ferreira J, Holmans P, Langbehn D, Lewis G, Lindquist M.... (2014) Scientific rigor and the art of motorcycle maintenance. Nature Biotechnology, 32(9), 871-3. PMID: 25203032  

  • December 14, 2014
  • 04:48 AM
  • 70 views

Beware the inflated science related press release!

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I'm not normally minded to post on a Sunday (day of rest and all that) but I did want to bring your attention to the results presented by Petroc Sumner and colleagues [1] (open-access) concluding that: "Exaggeration in news is strongly associated with exaggeration in press releases" when it comes to the media reporting of [some] health-related science news.The idea behind this particular study - which has been summarised pretty well in some of the accompanying media and in an editorial........ Read more »

  • December 13, 2014
  • 01:51 PM
  • 90 views

High fat diet leads to brain inflammation and obesity

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

The stomach strikes again, or so it seems. We’ve already covered how your stomach seemingly controls your brain and your blood-brain barrier, but now it seems that what you eat –not too indirectly related to your stomach– might make you fatter, but not in the way you might be thinking thinking. What you are eating may be causing inflammation in the brain.... Read more »

  • December 13, 2014
  • 11:56 AM
  • 70 views

Animal Research Sheds Light on Harmful Mood Disorders in New Mothers

by Wiley Asia Blog in Wiley Asia Blog - Social Science

In the days shortly after giving birth, most mothers experience a period of increased calmness and decreased stress responses, but around 20% of mothers experience anxiety. Some women may become depressed, and around one in a thousand can develop psychosis. The latest evidence indicates that these distressing responses to motherhood are still poorly understood, but that animal research could provide valuable clues to their causes.

Writing in the British Journal of Pharmacology, Dr David Slatt........ Read more »

Perani, C., & Slattery, D. (2014) Using animal models to study post-partum psychiatric disorders. British Journal of Pharmacology, 171(20), 4539-4555. DOI: 10.1111/bph.12640  

  • December 13, 2014
  • 09:56 AM
  • 79 views

Gibbon genome and the fast karyotype evolution of small apes

by Sandra Bosshard in genome ecology evolution etc

Gibbons (Hylobatidae) are small arboreal apes that form a key node in primate evolution. One of the most distinctive phenotype is their high genome plasticity involving large-scale chromosomal rearrangements and karyotype changes. The four gibbon genera (Nomascus, Hylobates, Hoolock, Symphalangus) … Continue reading →... Read more »

Carbone, L., Alan Harris, R., Gnerre, S., Veeramah, K., Lorente-Galdos, B., Huddleston, J., Meyer, T., Herrero, J., Roos, C., Aken, B.... (2014) Gibbon genome and the fast karyotype evolution of small apes. Nature, 513(7517), 195-201. DOI: 10.1038/nature13679  

  • December 13, 2014
  • 05:19 AM
  • 75 views

Social communication disorder (SCD) reviewed

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Sometimes I believe in as many as six impossible things before breakfast.A micropost if you will, for today, and a link to a potentially very important paper by Lauren Swineford and colleagues [1] (open-access) talking about the diagnostic concept: social (pragmatic) communication disorder (SCD) and it's various crossings with language impairments and autism spectrum disorder (ASD).SCD, as I've indicated in other posts (see here and see here) is something that the autism community in partic........ Read more »

  • December 12, 2014
  • 11:20 PM
  • 74 views

Use of Toning or Unstable Shoes to Aid Post Marathon Recovery

by Craig Payne in Running Research Junkie

Use of Toning or Unstable Shoes to Aid Post Marathon Recovery... Read more »

join us!

Do you write about peer-reviewed research in your blog? Use ResearchBlogging.org to make it easy for your readers — and others from around the world — to find your serious posts about academic research.

If you don't have a blog, you can still use our site to learn about fascinating developments in cutting-edge research from around the world.

Register Now

Research Blogging is powered by SMG Technology.

To learn more, visit seedmediagroup.com.