Post List

  • February 25, 2015
  • 09:28 PM
  • 23 views

C. difficile Most Common Health Care Associated Infection

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Fernanda C. Lessa, M.D., M.P.H. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Atlanta, GA MedicalResearch: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Lessa: The epidemiology of Clostridium difficile has gone through dramatic … Continue reading →... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Fernanda C. Lessa, M.D., M.P.H. (2015) C. difficile Most Common Health Care Associated Infection . MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • February 25, 2015
  • 03:38 PM
  • 101 views

The food additive that may be promoting obesity and metabolic syndrome

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

People say to avoid processed foods, while I don’t agree with that fully, a new study suggests that a common food additive may be causing problems. Emulsifiers, which are added to most processed foods to aid texture and extend shelf life, can alter the gut microbiota composition and localization to induce intestinal inflammation that promotes the development of inflammatory bowel disease and metabolic syndrome.... Read more »

  • February 25, 2015
  • 11:36 AM
  • 76 views

Using the Dead to Interpret Daily Life in Bronze Age Spain

by Katy Meyers Emery in Bones Don't Lie

I am fascinated by the diversity of ways that humans have approached death and dying throughout our history as a species. Since you’re reading this, I’ll assume you are interested […]... Read more »

  • February 25, 2015
  • 09:41 AM
  • 69 views

Video Tip of the Week: CRISPRdirect for editing tools and off-target information

by Mary in OpenHelix

Genome editing strategies are certainly a hot topic of late. We were astonished at the traffic that the animation of the CRISPR/Cas-9 process recently drew to the blog. There’s a huge amount of potential for novel types of studies and interventions in human disease situations–but I’m already seeing applications in agriculture coming along. There’s an […]... Read more »

  • February 25, 2015
  • 09:30 AM
  • 70 views

Examining Evidence for Leaderboards and Learning

by Richard Landers in NeoAcademic

As I described in my last post, gamification is often misused and abused, applied in ways and in situations where it is unlikely to do much good. When we deploy new learning technologies, the ultimate goal of that change should always be clear, first and foremost. So how do you actually go about setting that sort of […]The post Examining Evidence for Leaderboards and Learning appeared first on NeoAcademic.Related articles from NeoAcademic:Psychological Theory and Gamification of Learning........ Read more »

  • February 25, 2015
  • 08:37 AM
  • 44 views

Should mice be used to study the human gut microbiome?

by Isabel Torres in Science in the clouds

In recent years, the trillions of bacteria living in our guts have risen from obscurity to stardom. Hyped press releases claim that probiotics and faecal transplants might one day treat almost everything, from bowel inflictions to obesity. These studies often involve mice, but are these rodents really a suitable model for microbiome research?The gut microbiome has been associated with an ever-growing list of diseases, including obesity, diabetes and even mental disorders such as anxiet........ Read more »

  • February 25, 2015
  • 08:30 AM
  • 45 views

Why You Need to Socialize Your Puppy

by CAPB in Companion Animal Psychology Blog

The importance of socialization can’t be stressed enough.These days, more and more people understand that puppies need to be socialized. But sometimes people wonder, how do we know this? It’s based on classic research in canine science.Many papers contribute to our understanding of puppies. In 1950, J.P. Scott and Mary-‘Vesta Marston published a study of 17 litters, including the earliest age at which they opened their eyes for the first time, began to walk, and engaged in play. They hypot........ Read more »

  • February 25, 2015
  • 08:17 AM
  • 14 views

High Fluoride in Drinking Water May Be Linked To Hypothyroidism

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Professor Stephen Peckham Director, Centre for Health Services Studies Professor of Health Policy Department of Health Services Research and Policy London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Director, Policy Research Unit in Commissioning and the Healthcare System … Continue reading →... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Professor Stephen Peckham. (2015) High Fluoride in Drinking Water May Be Linked To Hypothyroidism. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • February 25, 2015
  • 08:00 AM
  • 42 views

Mirroring Evolution

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

Heads and symmetric bodies didn’t necessarily evolve at the same time, but we don’t know which was first. Some animals have heads and bilateral bodies, and some have radial bodies and no heads. Are there any in between? Yes, and no, but why would any group of animals lose heads after they had evolved them?... Read more »

  • February 25, 2015
  • 07:58 AM
  • 10 views

Shorter Hospital Stay For Hip Fracture Linked To Higher Mortality After Discharge

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Prof. Peter Nordström Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation Geriatrics, Umeå University Umeå, Sweden MedicalResearch: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Prof. Nordström: The number of elderly people is increasing, while … Continue reading →... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Prof. Peter Nordström. (2015) Shorter Hospital Stay For Hip Fracture Linked To Higher Mortality After Discharge. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • February 25, 2015
  • 07:34 AM
  • 12 views

New and Experienced Surgeons Have Similar Patient Mortality Rates

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Samuel D. Pimentel Doctoral student Statistics Department Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania   MedicalResearch: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: Surgical training has undergone major changes in recent … Continue reading →... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Samuel D. Pimentel. (2015) New and Experienced Surgeons Have Similar Patient Mortality Rates. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • February 25, 2015
  • 06:01 AM
  • 30 views

The six forms of resistance shown by participants in Milgram's notorious "obedience studies"

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

When discussing Milgram's notorious experiments, in which participants were instructed to give increasingly dangerous electric shocks to another person, most commentators take a black or white approach.Participants are categorised as obedient or defiant, and the headline result is taken as the surprising number of people – the majority – who obeyed by going all the way and administering the highest, lethal voltage.A new study takes a different stance by looking at the different acts of resis........ Read more »

  • February 25, 2015
  • 05:31 AM
  • 43 views

Analysing the salivary proteome in autism

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The paper from Armand Ngounou Wetie and colleagues [1] (open-access here) reporting pilot results from a mass spectrometry based proteomic analysis of saliva in cases of autism or autism spectrum disorder (ASD) compared with asymptomatic controls is served up for your reading delight today. There has already been some media attention about this paper (see here).It's an interesting paper for quite a few reasons; not least the continuing voyage of the analytical technique known as mass spectr........ Read more »

Ngounou Wetie AG, Wormwood KL, Russell S, Ryan JP, Darie CC, & Woods AG. (2015) A Pilot Proteomic Analysis of Salivary Biomarkers in Autism Spectrum Disorder. Autism research : official journal of the International Society for Autism Research. PMID: 25626423  

  • February 25, 2015
  • 12:05 AM
  • 32 views

Consider the Landing Surface When Thinking About Landing Techniques

by Kyle Harris in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

College athletes have decreased quadriceps:hamstring activation ratio, increased peak hamstring activation, and increased trunk sway when landing on an unstable surface versus a stable surface.
... Read more »

  • February 25, 2015
  • 12:02 AM
  • 62 views

Can’t stand the sounds of chewing, loud breathing, or pen clicking? Dutch psychiatrists propose that may be the symptom of a new disorder

by Megan Cartwright in Science-Based Writing

Dutch psychiatrists have proposed that misophonia – a hypersensitivity to common, irritating noises like eating, loud breathing, and pen clicking – be classified as its own psychiatric disorder. After evaluating 42 Dutch patients with the disorder, the psychiatrists concluded that … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • February 24, 2015
  • 10:15 PM
  • 59 views

Most supernatural beliefs are about avoiding harm, not bringing benefit

by Tom Rees in Epiphenom

A survey of supernatural beliefs across cultures around the world has found that beliefs involving hazards and harms were about 50% more common than beliefs about benefits, opportunities and other good things. Daniel Fessler, at the University of California, and colleagues searched a representative dataset of 60 cultures held at the Human Relations Area Files [Read More...]... Read more »

  • February 24, 2015
  • 09:25 PM
  • 43 views

Personalized Medicine: Gene Predicts Neuropathy from Vincristine Chemotherapy

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: William E. Evans, Pharm.D. Member, Pharmaceutical Sciences St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital MedicalResearch: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Evans: We are currently curing over 85 percent of children with … Continue reading →... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & William E. Evans, Pharm.D. (2015) Personalized Medicine: Gene Predicts Neuropathy from Vincristine Chemotherapy. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • February 24, 2015
  • 09:03 PM
  • 41 views

Study Assesses Accuracy of Multiple Cardiovascular Risk Scores

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Andrew Paul DeFilippis, MD, MSc Assistant Professor of Medicine University of Louisville Director, Cardiovascular Disease Prevention Medical Director, Cardiovascular Intensive Care Unit Adjunct Assistant Professor of Medicine Johns Hopkins University of Louisville Jewish Hospital Rudd Heart & … Continue reading →... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Andrew Paul DeFilippis, MD, MSc. (2015) Study Assesses Accuracy of Multiple Cardiovascular Risk Scores. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • February 24, 2015
  • 05:14 PM
  • 40 views

Is belief in moral progress a substitute for religion?

by Tom Rees in Epiphenom

There’s a well studied phenomenon called Terror Management Theory which basically says that, when people are reminded of their own death, their beliefs change in certain predictable ways.  People cling more strongly to beliefs that make the future seem more controllable and comfortable – and that includes turning to religion (see: Religion, Patriotism and Death). [Read More...]... Read more »

Rutjens, B., van Harreveld, F., van der Pligt, J., van Elk, M., & Pyszczynski, T. (2014) A march to a better world? Religiosity and the existential function of belief in social-moral progress. The International Journal for the Psychology of Religion, 1-33. DOI: 10.1080/10508619.2014.990345  

  • February 24, 2015
  • 04:57 PM
  • 46 views

Anesthesia Drug and Deep Sleep Use Same Neural Circuits In Brain

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview Nick Franks FSB, FRCA, FMedSci, FRS, Professor of Biophysics and Anaesthetics, Professor William Wisden, Chair in Molecular Neuroscience Department of Life sciences Wolfson Laboratories, Imperial College, South Kensington, London, Medical Research: What is the background for this study? … Continue reading →... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview, Nick Franks FSB, FRCA, FMedSci, FRS, Professor of Biophysics and Anaesthetics,, & Professor William Wisden,. (2015) Anesthesia Drug and Deep Sleep Use Same Neural Circuits In Brain. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

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