Post List

  • December 12, 2014
  • 04:00 PM
  • 61 views

Breaking Research: A new technique for studying axon death using fruit fly wings

by Bethany Christmann in Fly on the Wall

The axon is the part of a neuron that carries outgoing information. (cb = cell body) In neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s disease or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a genetic mutation leads to widespread neuron damage. When a neuron is damaged, its axon—the part of the neuron that carries outgoing signals—is actively broken down and […]... Read more »

Neukomm L. J., M. A. Gonzalez, S. Zuchner, & M. R. Freeman. (2014) Rapid in vivo forward genetic approach for identifying axon death genes in Drosophila. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 111(27), 9965-9970. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1406230111  

  • December 12, 2014
  • 02:13 PM
  • 73 views

A new type of memory storage on the horizon

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

For those of us old enough to remember the days of the Apple II, you know that storage has exponentially increased. Even just 10 years ago 20+ gigs of data seemed huge, now my cellphone has 64 gigs. Yet we still need more data storage and we are looking for new ways to get it. Now a way to use weak molecular bonding interactions to create well-ordered and stable metal–organic monolayers with optoelectronic properties has been found. The development could form the basis for the scalable fabrica........ Read more »

  • December 12, 2014
  • 12:37 PM
  • 76 views

Long Sperm Are Winners

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish



It's tough to be sperm. Your entire existence centers on one race that you will almost definitely lose. You don't even get to take a warmup lap. Nevertheless, a glance at your competitors waiting at the starting line might give you some hints about who has an advantage. One factor that helps sperm win races is length—and not only for the reasons you might guess.

Long sperm generally have longer tails. This ought to make them faster and more powerful swimmers, which studies have confirmed........ Read more »

Clair Bennison, Nicola Hemmings, Jon Slate, & Tim Birkhead. (2014) Long sperm fertilize more eggs in a bird. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. info:/10.1098/rspb.2014.1897

  • December 12, 2014
  • 10:37 AM
  • 80 views

Detecting lies with fMRI

by neurosci in Neuroscientifically Challenged

In 2006, a company called No Lie MRI began advertising their ability to detect "deception and other information stored in the brain" using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). They were not the first to make this claim. Two years prior, a company called Cephos had been founded on the same principle. Both companies were launched by entrepreneurs who hoped to one day replace the polygraph machine and its recognized shortcomings with a foolproof approach to lie detection.Within several yea........ Read more »

  • December 12, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 76 views

Simple Jury Persuasion: Gender and message delivery and framing

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

We are again honored by our inclusion in the ABA Blawg 100 list for 2014. If you value this blog, please take a moment to vote for us here in the Litigation Category. Voting closes on December 19, 2014. Doug and Rita Trial lawyers (and others who communicate to persuade) are always looking for a […]

Related posts:
Simple Jury Persuasion: Are those folks in the jury box thinkers or feelers?
Simple Jury Persuasion: Be Powerful in the Courtroom
Simple Jury Persuasion: Should we channel Do........ Read more »

  • December 12, 2014
  • 03:32 AM
  • 77 views

Party On! (If You're Middle-Class and Young): Age Differences Explain Social Class Differences in University Friendships

by Mark Rubin in Mark Rubin's Social Psychology Research Blog

In a recent meta-analytic review, I found that working-class students are less integrated at university than their middle-class peers. I offered up nine potential explanations for this working-class exclusion effect. It turns out that one of the simplest explanations in this list is also the most promising. It’s all to do with age.Working-class students tend to be older than middle-class students. Why? Most likely because they don’t tend to go to university immediately after school but i........ Read more »

  • December 12, 2014
  • 02:58 AM
  • 68 views

Researchers Discover Well-Endowed Bone Eating Worm

by beredim in Strange Animals



Male Osedax priapus
The entire body of males has evolved  as a tool for mating

Osedax is a genus of weird, deep-sea polychaetes worms, commonly known as boneworms, zombie worms, or bone-eating worms.



The story of these creatures began twelve years ago, when researchers from the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) first discovered them, using the submarine ROV Tiburon in ... Read more »

  • December 11, 2014
  • 11:15 PM
  • 127 views

The Male Idiot Theory

by Shelly Fan in Neurorexia

Image credits: bilbypdalgyte.deviantart.com Yes, that’s a thing. According to hospital emergency departments and mortality stats, men are far likelier than women to experience accidental and sporting injuries, as well as...... Read more »

Ben Alexander, Daniel Lendrem, Dennis William Lendrem, Andy Gray, & John Dudley Isaacs. (2014) The Darwin Awards: sex differences in idiotic behaviour. BMJ, 349. info:/Ben Alexander Daniel Lendrem Dennis William Lendrem Andy Gray John Dudley Isaacs

  • December 11, 2014
  • 08:27 PM
  • 91 views

Depression And Stress/Mood Disorders: Causes Of Repetitive Negative Thinking And Ruminations

by Alexis Delanoir in How to Paint Your Panda

Repetitive Negative Thinking (RNT) has been suggested to be of clinical significance as a transdiagnostic process. Research has been conducted to explain the causes of RNT and ruminations but is limited. This article explores the causes and possible solutions to RNT, as well as its clinical implications concerning mood and stress disorders such as major depressive disorder (MDD).... Read more »

Ehring, T., & Watkins, E. (2008) Repetitive Negative Thinking as a Transdiagnostic Process. International Journal of Cognitive Therapy, 1(3), 192-205. DOI: 10.1680/ijct.2008.1.3.192  

Gibb, B., Grassia, M., Stone, L., Uhrlass, D., & McGeary, J. (2011) Brooding Rumination and Risk for Depressive Disorders in Children of Depressed Mothers. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 40(2), 317-326. DOI: 10.1007/s10802-011-9554-y  

  • December 11, 2014
  • 07:40 PM
  • 69 views

The Effect of Footwear on Running Performance

by Craig Payne in Running Research Junkie

The Effect of Footwear on Running Performance... Read more »

  • December 11, 2014
  • 07:14 PM
  • 70 views

Chronic fatigue syndrome by ASIA?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Unicorns, I love them. Unicorns, I love them. ASIA, in the context of this post, does not refer to the continent but rather the suggestion of an: ‘autoimmune (auto-inflammatory) syndrome induced by adjuvants’ and some potentially contentious findings reported by Nancy Agmon-Levin and colleagues [1].Describing a small cohort of participants diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and/or fibromyalgia (FM), the authors put forward the idea that "some cases CFS and FM can be........ Read more »

  • December 11, 2014
  • 02:32 PM
  • 71 views

The Headless Romans: Headhunting, Defeated Gladiators or Natural River Movement?

by Katy Meyers Emery in Bones Don't Lie

In the Walbrook Valley near the city of London, large numbers of human remains, dating to the Roman occupation of England, have been recovered over the past 175 years- and […]... Read more »

  • December 11, 2014
  • 12:31 PM
  • 68 views

Kidney Donors Over 60 Have Good Recipient Results

by Cristy at Living Donor 101 in Living Donors Are People Too

A single transplant center analysis of 181 living kidney donors categorized by age revealed that “donor age…was not a risk factor for patient or graft survival”. The death-uncensored graft survival rates in the 3 subgroups (.39; 40-59; 60+) were 64.5%, 76.0% and 90.9%, respectively, whereas their mean estimated glomerular filtration rates 1 year after transplantation were 40.7 …
Continue reading »
The post Kidney Donors Over 60 Have Good Recipient Results appeared........ Read more »

  • December 11, 2014
  • 12:25 PM
  • 82 views

Cheers! The Evolution of Alcohol

by Jente Ottenburghs in Evolutionary Stories

A recent study in PNAS traced the evolution of ADH4, an enzyme to process alcohol. Their results are quite surprising!... Read more »

Carrigan, M., Uryasev, O., Frye, C., Eckman, B., Myers, C., Hurley, T., & Benner, S. (2014) Hominids adapted to metabolize ethanol long before human-directed fermentation. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 201404167. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1404167111  

  • December 11, 2014
  • 12:08 PM
  • 70 views

What makes us fat, OR food vs. physiology

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

There is a heir of mystery surrounding weight loss and fat in general. Have you ever heard you have all the fat cells you’ll ever have — that’s false by the way. Then there is fad diets like gluten free — proven to do nothing unless you actually have a diagnosed gluten allergy — or adkins, but now researchers believe they’re on track to solve the mystery of weight gain – and it has nothing to do with indulging in holiday eggnog.... Read more »

Woeller CF, O'loughlin CW, Pollock SJ, Thatcher TH, Feldon SE, & Phipps RP. (2014) Thy1 (CD90) controls adipogenesis by regulating activity of the Src family kinase, Fyn. FASEB journal : official publication of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. PMID: 25416548  

  • December 11, 2014
  • 10:29 AM
  • 21 views

Rapport-building interrogation is more effective than torture

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

Past research (pdf) suggests that using torture as a way to extract information or confessions from terror suspects isn't just unethical, it's also ineffective. The advantage of rapport-building interrogation strategies (including respect, friendliness and empathy towards suspects) over more coercive techniques is highlighted once again in a new study that involved interviews with law enforcement interrogators and detainees.The research involved 34 interrogators (1 woman) from several internatio........ Read more »

Goodman-Delahunty, J., Martschuk, N., & Dhami, M. (2014) Interviewing High Value Detainees: Securing Cooperation and Disclosures. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 28(6), 883-897. DOI: 10.1002/acp.3087  

  • December 11, 2014
  • 09:39 AM
  • 63 views

What’s the Answer? (tidy data format)

by Mary in OpenHelix

Biostars is a site for asking, answering and discussing bioinformatics questions and issues. We are members of the community and find it very useful. Often questions and answers arise at Biostars that are germane to our readers (end users of genomics resources). Every Thursday we will be highlighting one of those items or discussions here […]... Read more »

Wickham Hadley Wickham. (2014) Tidy Data. Journal of Statistical Software, 59(10). info:other/JSSOBK:v59i10

  • December 11, 2014
  • 09:10 AM
  • 60 views

O Christmas Tree: It’s Not Easy Being Green

by Bill Sullivan in The 'Scope

How do evergreens stay "ever green" and why are they used as Christmas trees?... Read more »

Brodribb TJ, McAdam SA, Jordan GJ, & Martins SC. (2014) Conifer species adapt to low-rainfall climates by following one of two divergent pathways. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 111(40), 14489-93. PMID: 25246559  

  • December 11, 2014
  • 07:45 AM
  • 66 views

People's support for torture in "ticking time bomb scenarios" is influenced by their desire for retribution

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

In the wake of a report published yesterday into the CIA's use of torture, many people are shocked and appalled. Yet one defence of the practice remains popular - "the ticking time bomb scenario".This is the idea that torture is justified if a suspect knows the location of bomb in a public place, and many lives would be saved if he or she were coerced into telling authorities the location in time for it to be deactivated. The new Senate Intelligence Committee report describes how the ticking tim........ Read more »

  • December 11, 2014
  • 07:37 AM
  • 27 views

Are Poetry and Psychosis Linked?

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

Is there a relationship between poetry and psychosis?

The idea that 'genius' is just one step removed from 'madness' is a venerable one, and psychiatrists and psychologists have spent a great (perhaps an inordinate) amount of time looking for correlations between mental illness and creativity.

Now a new British study has examined whether poets exhibit more traits of psychosis than other people. One of the authors is a published poet, Helen Mort.



The researchers recruited 294 poets i... Read more »

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