Post List

  • February 2, 2016
  • 04:37 AM
  • 81 views

Scientific evidence that counting to 10 helps control anger (sometimes)

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

It's something we're taught from a young age – when you're about to go into a rage, force yourself to count to ten and hopefully the storm will pass. This may sound like common sense, but without testing the method scientifically, how do we know if and when it really works? For example, while the counting delay could give you a chance to get a grip of your aggressive urges, it's equally plausible that it could give you time to grow even angrier about whatever triggered your displeasure in the ........ Read more »

  • February 2, 2016
  • 04:29 AM
  • 106 views

Risk of cancer in autism: probably not excessive as more data emerge

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

A quote to begin: "Taken together, there are no published evidence to suggest that there is a high overall concordance between ASD [autism spectrum disorders] and cancer or between ASD and specific cancers."Those words reported by Svend Erik Mouridsen and colleagues [1] (who knows a thing or two about autism research) should offer some relief to both people on the autism spectrum and their loved ones.Based on the analysis of over 100 adults "diagnosed with infantile autism (IA) in........ Read more »

  • February 2, 2016
  • 02:13 AM
  • 91 views

Earth = combination of two planets (study shows)

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Point:

Earth is actually a combination of two planets, i.e. Earth and Theia, a planet thought to be about the size of Mars.

Published in:

Science

Study Further:

Researchers from University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) have recently reported that there was a “violent, head-on collision” of Earth and Theia, which is thought to be an ancient planet having the approximate size of Mars or according to some it was about Earth’s size, about 4.5 billion years ag........ Read more »

Young, E., Kohl, I., Warren, P., Rubie, D., Jacobson, S., & Morbidelli, A. (2016) Oxygen isotopic evidence for vigorous mixing during the Moon-forming giant impact. Science, 351(6272), 493-496. DOI: 10.1126/science.aad0525  

  • February 1, 2016
  • 04:14 PM
  • 81 views

Schizophrenia, Hubris and Science

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover





A press-release from the Harvard-MIT Broad Institute reaches astonishing heights of hyperbole in announcing a new schizophrenia study (Sekar et al. 2016). Here's the release:
Genetic study provides first-ever insight into biological origin of schizophrenia

Landmark analysis reveals excessive "pruning" of connections between neurons in brain predisposes to schizophrenia

A landmark study, based on genetic analysis of nearly 65,000 people, has revealed that a person’s risk of schizo... Read more »

Sekar A, Bialas AR, de Rivera H, Davis A, Hammond TR, Kamitaki N, Tooley K, Presumey J, Baum M, Van Doren V.... (2016) Schizophrenia risk from complex variation of complement component 4. Nature. PMID: 26814963  

  • February 1, 2016
  • 03:59 PM
  • 76 views

The tegu lizard and the origin of warm-blooded animals

by Piter Boll in Earthling Nature

by Piter Kehoma Boll Warm blood is the popular way to refer to endothermy, the ability that certain animals have to maintain a high body temperature by the use of heat generated via metabolism, especially in internal organs. Mammals and birds … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • February 1, 2016
  • 03:41 PM
  • 116 views

Blood pressure medicine may improve conversational skills of individuals with autism

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

An estimated 1 in 68 children in the United States has autism. The neurodevelopmental disorder, which impairs communication and social interaction skills, can be treated with medications and behavioral therapies, though there is no cure. Now, University of Missouri researchers have found that a medication commonly used to treat high blood pressure and irregular heartbeats may have the potential to improve some social functions of individuals with autism.

... Read more »

  • February 1, 2016
  • 10:55 AM
  • 108 views

Working memory training could help beat anxiety

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

One thing anxiety does is to upset your brain's balance between focus and vigilance. Your control over what you pay attention to is sacrificed at the expense of worrisome thoughts and a rapid response to any potential danger.If this account is true, basic attention training should help, putting you back in charge of your own mind. A key component of attentional control is working memory – our ability to juggle task-relevant information in mind over short-periods of time. In a new paper in Biol........ Read more »

  • February 1, 2016
  • 10:28 AM
  • 71 views

A True Underdog…or Undermouse

by Miss Behavior in The Scorpion and the Frog

By Spencer Henkel People love a good underdog story, and nowhere is that image more embodied than in the rodents that live in deserts. In the desert there are two main problems that animals must face: it is way too hot and way too dry. You would think that rodents, the smallest of mammals, would not have much difficulty surviving in this kind of habitat. You might think that they would need far less food and water than their larger neighbors like reptiles and birds. Unfortunately, this is no........ Read more »

  • February 1, 2016
  • 04:30 AM
  • 93 views

Should We Check the Checking Age in Youth Ice Hockey?

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Concussion rates in youth ice hockey are nearly 3 times higher during games compared to practice, and 12 to 14 year olds have higher incidence rates compared to 15 to 18 year olds.... Read more »

Kontos, A., Elbin, R., Sufrinko, A., Dakan, S., Bookwalter, K., Price, A., Meehan, W., & Collins, M. (2016) Incidence of Concussion in Youth Ice Hockey Players. PEDIATRICS. DOI: 10.1542/peds.2015-1633  

  • February 1, 2016
  • 02:47 AM
  • 140 views

On (pre)pregnancy obesity and inflammation and offspring autism risk

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

At the time of writing this [long read] post there has been a flurry of autism research articles making news.The headline: 'Scientists create the first ever autistic monkeys' referring to the work published by Liu and colleagues [1] who reported on "lentivirus-based transgenic cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) expressing human MeCP2 in the brain exhibit autism-like behaviours and show germline transmission of the transgene" started the ball rolling. Anyone who knows a little bit about aut........ Read more »

Li, M., Fallin, M., Riley, A., Landa, R., Walker, S., Silverstein, M., Caruso, D., Pearson, C., Kiang, S., Dahm, J.... (2016) The Association of Maternal Obesity and Diabetes With Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities. PEDIATRICS, 137(2), 1-10. DOI: 10.1542/peds.2015-2206  

Choi GB, Yim YS, Wong H, Kim S, Kim H, Kim SV, Hoeffer CA, Littman DR, & Huh JR. (2016) The maternal interleukin-17a pathway in mice promotes autismlike phenotypes in offspring. Science (New York, N.Y.). PMID: 26822608  

  • January 31, 2016
  • 08:08 PM
  • 97 views

Zika Virus (ZIKV): similarities to other arboviruses

by thelonevirologist in Virology Tidbits

Zika Virus (ZIKV) is an arbovirus belonging to the Flaviviridae transmitted primarily by mosquitoes (including Aedes Agypti). Although first identified in a resuscitate monkey from the forests in Uganda in the year 1947 with estimated first emergence probably in 1920, the first human case was only reported in 1964. ZIKV has been shown to be distributed Northern Africa as well as in Southeast Asia; however only a few human cases in Africa and Asia were identified until 2007, when a ZIKV outbreak ........ Read more »

Ioos S, Mallet HP, Leparc Goffart I, Gauthier V, Cardoso T, & Herida M. (2014) Current Zika virus epidemiology and recent epidemics. Medecine et maladies infectieuses, 44(7), 302-7. PMID: 25001879  

Gannage M, & Münz C. (2010) MHC presentation via autophagy and how viruses escape from it. Seminars in immunopathology, 32(4), 373-81. PMID: 20857294  

Bell TM, Field EJ, & Narang HK. (1971) Zika virus infection of the central nervous system of mice. Archiv fur die gesamte Virusforschung, 35(2), 183-93. PMID: 5002906  

Foy BD, Kobylinski KC, Chilson Foy JL, Blitvich BJ, Travassos da Rosa A, Haddow AD, Lanciotti RS, & Tesh RB. (2011) Probable non-vector-borne transmission of Zika virus, Colorado, USA. Emerging infectious diseases, 17(5), 880-2. PMID: 21529401  

Salvetti A, & Greco A. (2014) Viruses and the nucleolus: the fatal attraction. Biochimica et biophysica acta, 1842(6), 840-7. PMID: 24378568  

Martín-Acebes MA, Blázquez AB, & Saiz JC. (2015) Reconciling West Nile virus with the autophagic pathway. Autophagy, 11(5), 861-4. PMID: 25946067  

  • January 31, 2016
  • 02:57 PM
  • 176 views

The brains of patients with schizophrenia vary depending on the type of schizophrenia

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

I have a friend who lost an eye to his brother. Yes, you read that correctly, his brother tried to kill him and in the process he lost his eye. I’ve told this story before, but whenever new schizophrenia research comes out I feel the need to tell it again. While he has forgiven his brother (partly because not long after, he was diagnosed as schizophrenic), he will not be able to see him again until he is released from prison. A tragedy that could’ve been avoided had he been diagnosed sooner......... Read more »

  • January 31, 2016
  • 07:47 AM
  • 113 views

Better method for faster learning of math

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Point:

Finger tracing can help school-going kids in learning mathematics better.

Published in:

Applied Cognitive Psychology

Learning and Instruction

Study Further:

Researchers from Sydney worked with 275 school-going children in the age range of 9 to 13 years. They found that tracing of mathematical points on fingers could help children in better understanding and solving the previously unknown problems of algebra and geometry. So, finger tracing of practice examples while........ Read more »

Ginns, P., Hu, F., Byrne, E., & Bobis, J. (2015) Learning By Tracing Worked Examples. Applied Cognitive Psychology. DOI: 10.1002/acp.3171  

  • January 31, 2016
  • 07:09 AM
  • 106 views

Coal tar, dyes, and the unlikely origins of psychotherapeutic drugs

by neurosci in Neuroscientifically Challenged










While it may be difficult to imagine in a day and age when psychiatric medicines are advertised as a way to treat nearly every mental disorder, only 65 years ago targeted and effective psychiatric medicines were still just an unrealized aspiration. In fact, until the middle of the 20th century, the efficacy and safety of many common approaches to treating mental illness were highly questionable. For example, one method of treating schizophrenia that was common in the 1940s........ Read more »

López-Muñoz, F., Alamo, C., cuenca, E., Shen, W., Clervoy, P., & Rubio, G. (2005) History of the Discovery and Clinical Introduction of Chlorpromazine. Annals of Clinical Psychiatry, 17(3), 113-135. DOI: 10.1080/10401230591002002  

  • January 31, 2016
  • 07:06 AM
  • 111 views

Bad side of selfie and its posting on Instagram

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Point:

Selfie obsession can badly affect the relationship with partner.

Published in:

Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking

Study Further:

“Selfie” is one of the latest things of our era. It is also amusing for many people. In a study, researchers from Florida State University were trying to find the effect and outcomes of selfies and their posting on Instagram. They surveyed 420 Instagram users in the age range of 18 years to 62 years.

Researchers f........ Read more »

  • January 30, 2016
  • 03:21 PM
  • 157 views

Neurological adaptations to the presence of toxic HIV protein

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Nearly half of HIV infected patients suffer from impaired neurocognitive function. The HIV protein transactivator of transcription (Tat) is an important contributor to HIV neuropathogenesis because it is a potent neurotoxin that continues to be produced despite treatment with antiretroviral therapy.

... Read more »

  • January 30, 2016
  • 01:17 PM
  • 130 views

This Month in Blastocystis Research (JAN 2016)

by Christen Rune Stensvold in Blastocystis Parasite Blog

The first post in the This Month in Blastocystis Research series in 2016 is about Blastocystis epidemiology in India (including IBS patients), views on treatment, and Blastocystis in non-human primates.... Read more »

Pandey PK, Verma P, Marathe N, Shetty S, Bavdekar A, Patole MS, Stensvold CR, & Shouche YS. (2015) Prevalence and subtype analysis of Blastocystis in healthy Indian individuals. Infection, genetics and evolution : journal of molecular epidemiology and evolutionary genetics in infectious diseases, 296-9. PMID: 25701123  

Kurt Ö, Doğruman Al F, & Tanyüksel M. (2016) Eradication of Blastocystis in humans: Really necessary for all?. Parasitology international. PMID: 26780545  

  • January 30, 2016
  • 07:47 AM
  • 116 views

Suicide of a person can result in more suicides

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Point:

A person’s suicide can increase the chances of suicide attempt of his or her family member or friend.

Published in:

BMJ Open

Study Further:

Suicide is one of the most harmful things in the life of people left behind. Researchers from the University College London found that people, who have faced the suicide of a family member or friend, have 65% more chances of attempting suicide as compared to those people, who have faced the sudden death of their loved ones du........ Read more »

  • January 30, 2016
  • 07:01 AM
  • 119 views

The Automatic Neuroscientist

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

We've learned this week that computers can play Go. But at least there's one human activity they will never master: neuroscience. A computer will never be a neuroscientist. Except... hang on. A new paper just out in Neuroimage describes something called The Automatic Neuroscientist. Oh.



So what is this new neuro-robot? According to its inventors, Romy Lorenz and colleagues of Imperial College London, it's a framework for using "real-time fMRI in combination with modern machine-learning te... Read more »

  • January 30, 2016
  • 04:00 AM
  • 125 views

Autism in phenylketonuria (PKU)

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"Autism has been reported in untreated patients with phenylketonuria."Indeed it has, as the paper by Sameh Khemir and colleagues [1] revisits something of a long known about association whereby the archetypal inborn error of metabolism that is phenylketonuria (PKU) has been linked to the presentation of autism or autistic traits [2].Looking at 18 participants diagnosed with PKU, Khemir et al "report their clinical, biochemical and molecular peculiarities" (authors words not mine) and h........ Read more »

Khemir S, Halayem S, Azzouz H, Siala H, Ferchichi M, Guedria A, Bedoui A, Abdelhak S, Messaoud T, Tebib N.... (2016) Autism in Phenylketonuria Patients: From Clinical Presentation to Molecular Defects. Journal of child neurology. PMID: 26759449  

join us!

Do you write about peer-reviewed research in your blog? Use ResearchBlogging.org to make it easy for your readers — and others from around the world — to find your serious posts about academic research.

If you don't have a blog, you can still use our site to learn about fascinating developments in cutting-edge research from around the world.

Register Now

Research Blogging is powered by SMG Technology.

To learn more, visit seedmediagroup.com.