Post List

  • April 14, 2014
  • 01:10 PM
  • 244 views

Does Access to Birth Control Reduce Poverty?

by Eric Horowitz in peer-reviewed by my neurons

In American politics the proliferation of birth control is important because of how it affects the eternal resting place of our immortal souls. But believe it or not, there are also non-metaphysical policy consequences to increasing access to birth control. A new study by a pair of economists — Stephanie Browne of J.P. Morgan and […]... Read more »

Browne, S., & LaLumia, S. (2014) The Effects of Contraception on Female Poverty. Journal of Policy Analysis and Management. DOI: 10.1002/pam.21761  

  • April 14, 2014
  • 12:13 PM
  • 50 views

North Greenland Glacier Ice-Ocean Interactions 2014

by Andreas Muenchow in Icy Seas

I will travel to Spitsbergen in six weeks to board the German research icebreaker Polarstern. She will sail west across the Fram Strait towards northern Greenland where some of the last remaining glaciers exist that still discharge their ice via … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • April 14, 2014
  • 10:24 AM
  • 95 views

Some exploratory evidence that wait-list conditions may act as a nocebo in psychotherapy trials

by Kristoffer Magnusson in R Psychologist

The hypothesis that wait-lists could be nocebo conditions was investigated by Furukawa et al (2014). The authors performed a network meta-analysis of 49 RCT that involved cognitive-behaviour therapy for depression. ... Read more »

Furukawa TA, Noma H, Caldwell DM, Honyashiki M, Shinohara K, Imai H, Chen P, Hunot V, & Churchill R. (2014) Waiting list may be a nocebo condition in psychotherapy trials: a contribution from network meta-analysis. Acta psychiatrica Scandinavica. PMID: 24697518  

  • April 14, 2014
  • 09:23 AM
  • 92 views

Scientists Suggest Planting Biofuel Crops on Solar Farms

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

A new model for solar farms that “co-locates” biofuel crops and solar panels could result in a harvest of valuable plants along with solar energy.... Read more »

  • April 14, 2014
  • 09:12 AM
  • 94 views

Why Humanistic Psychology is Still Relevant

by Jeremiah Stanghini in Jeremiah Stanghini

The development of humanistic psychology began in the late 1950s and was ‘born‘ in the early 1960s. Given the time that humanistic psychology grew, there’s no doubt that it informed the civil rights movement. However, some say that humanistic psychology peaked in the 1970s. An … Continue reading →... Read more »

DeRobertis, E. M. (2013) Humanistic Psychology: Alive in the 21st Century?. Journal of Humanistic Psychology, 53(4), 419-437. DOI: 10.1177/0022167812473369  

  • April 14, 2014
  • 09:00 AM
  • 12 views

Idealistic Thinking Linked With Economic Slump

by amikulak in Daily Observations

Envisioning a bright future should pave the way for success, right? Maybe not. Research suggests that thinking about an idealized future may actually be linked with economic downturn, not upswing. […]... Read more »

  • April 14, 2014
  • 09:00 AM
  • 104 views

How practicing compassion alters the brain

by Katharine Blackwell in Contemplating Cognition

As tempting as it is to hope that one meditation practice could be a panacea within the mind – meditate, and become more mindful! improve your attention! cure your depression! notice when those around you need help! – I have to admit that I know the brain doesn’t work this way. The skills you practice are the skills you strengthen, and compassion in particular is a skill that requires more than just a general awareness of your environment.... Read more »

Weng HY, Fox AS, Shackman AJ, Stodola DE, Caldwell JZ, Olson MC, Rogers GM, & Davidson RJ. (2013) Compassion training alters altruism and neural responses to suffering. Psychological science, 24(7), 1171-1180. PMID: 23696200  

  • April 14, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 64 views

A new neurolaw caveat to minimize punishment

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Just say his brain made him do it! That is the conclusion of new research on the relationship between gruesomeness of the crime and the harshness of the sentence. In case you can’t intuit this one, the more gruesome (and disturbing) the crime, the harsher the sentence tends to be. But if the assault was […]

Related posts:
Neurolaw Update: Who’s in charge here—me or my brain?
When identifying punishment—will jurors focus on intent or outcome?
Simple Jury Persuasion: Anger + Disgust........ Read more »

  • April 14, 2014
  • 06:04 AM
  • 72 views

Interview with Beddington Medal winner William Razzell

by the Node in the Node

Each year, the British Society for Developmental Biology (BSDB) awards the Beddington Medal to the best PhD thesis in developmental biology. This year’s award went to William Razzell, who completed his PhD in Paul Martin’s lab at the University of Bristol. At the BSDB Spring Meeting last month, Will presented his thesis studies of wound […]... Read more »

  • April 14, 2014
  • 03:58 AM
  • 74 views

Neurology of inflammatory bowel diseases

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The paper by Ben-Or and colleagues [1] talking about a neurologic profile present in a small participant cohort of children and adolescents diagnosed with an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) caught my eye recently. Their findings reporting that over two-thirds of their paediatric participant group diagnosed with IBD also "exhibited neurologic manifestations" provides some compelling preliminary evidence for further investigation in this area.Outside of reports of headache and dizziness, the pres........ Read more »

  • April 14, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 84 views

Time and Cost of Diagnosis for Symptomatic Femoroacetabular Impingement

by Meghan Maume Miller in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Diagnosing labral tears with femoroacetabular impingement can be slow and expensive, it is important for health care professionals to quickly recognize and manage the symptoms.... Read more »

Kahlenberg, C., Han, B., Patel, R., Deshmane, P., & Terry, M. (2014) Time and Cost of Diagnosis for Symptomatic Femoroacetabular Impingement. Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, 2(3). DOI: 10.1177/2325967114523916  

  • April 13, 2014
  • 11:45 PM
  • 69 views

Big data, prediction, and scientism in the social sciences

by Artem Kaznatcheev in Evolutionary Games Group

Much of my undergrad was spent studying physics, and although I still think that a physics background is great for a theorists in any field, there are some downsides. For example, I used to make jokes like: “soft isn’t the opposite of hard sciences, easy is.” Thankfully, over the years I have started to slowly […]... Read more »

Lazer, D., Kennedy, R., King, G., & Vespignani, A. (2014) Big data. The parable of Google Flu: traps in big data analysis. Science, 343(6176), 1203-1205. PMID: 24626916  

  • April 13, 2014
  • 01:56 PM
  • 88 views

Intro to External Pulsed Plasma Propulsion (EPPP)

by Jason Carr in Wired Cosmos

External Pulsed Plasma Propulsion (EPPP)  is something that’s been discussed for some time. In fact, it was originally proposed by Stanislaw Ulam way back in 1947. Unfortunately the public perception of atomic technology as well as pieces of otherwise well meaning legislation have called into question the feasibility of spacecraft that operate using this advanced … Read More →... Read more »

  • April 13, 2014
  • 01:46 PM
  • 64 views

Organic Solar Cell Benefit From Face-On Alignment of Molecules

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

New research from North Carolina State University and UNC-Chapel Hill reveals that energy is transferred more efficiently inside of complex, three-dimensional organic solar cells when the donor molecules align face-on, rather than edge-on, relative to the acceptor.... Read more »

Tumbleston, J., Collins, B., Yang, L., Stuart, A., Gann, E., Ma, W., You, W., & Ade, H. (2014) The influence of molecular orientation on organic bulk heterojunction solar cells. Nature Photonics. DOI: 10.1038/nphoton.2014.55  

  • April 13, 2014
  • 11:59 AM
  • 103 views

The Curse of the Internet

by Aurametrix team in Health Technologies

It's hard to imagine our lives without the Internet  - either mobile or desktop. The Internet has become a catalyst of innovation, an essential tool in business and social life. It brought new levels of participation and access to knowledge. It enabled new forms of interaction, albeit mostly utilized for entertainment purposes. But despite all the advantages and conveniences, does the Internet really serve us or is it the other way around?... Read more »

  • April 12, 2014
  • 11:54 PM
  • 83 views

Early brain development and heat shock proteins

by in Neuroscientifically Challenged

The brain development of a fetus is really an amazing thing. The first sign of an incipient nervous system emerges during the third week of development; it is simply a thickened layer of tissue called the neural plate. After about 5 more days, the neural plate has formed an indentation called the neural groove, and the sides of the neural groove have curled up and begun to fuse together (see pic to the right). This will form the neural tube, which will eventually become the brain and spinal cord........ Read more »

  • April 12, 2014
  • 04:58 PM
  • 79 views

Summer and winter Blackcaps and evolution

by Africa Gomez in BugBlog

During April, Blackcaps return to thickets and woodland, where the male's beautiful song joins the resident birds. These Blackcaps have just arrived from their winter quarters in Spain and North and coastal West Africa. We tend to think of migration behaviour as something fixed, but recent research shows that many birds have recently changed their migration routes. One of these is the Blackcap.In the last 50 years or so, a small contingent of Blackcaps have started to winter in the UK. About 30%........ Read more »

  • April 12, 2014
  • 01:38 PM
  • 77 views

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Causes, Symptoms, and Home Remedies

by Imtiaz Ibne Alam in Medical-Reference - A Pioneer in Medical Blogging

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common causes of woman's infertility. It is a problem results from an imbalance of female sex hormones. It may cause irregular menstruation, difficulties in getting pregnant, and cysts in the ovaries. If it's not treated, overtime it can lead to diabetes and several other troubling health conditions.... Read more »

Pau CT, Keefe CC, & Welt CK. (2013) Cigarette smoking, nicotine levels and increased risk for metabolic syndrome in women with polycystic ovary syndrome. Gynecological endocrinology : the official journal of the International Society of Gynecological Endocrinology, 29(6), 551-5. PMID: 23656383  

  • April 12, 2014
  • 12:12 PM
  • 85 views

Flexible Plastics Turn Vibrations Into Electrical Energy

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

Kui Yao and co-workers from the A*STAR Institute of Materials Research and Engineering in Singapore have discovered a way to give lightweight polymer vibration harvesters a hundredfold boost in energy output—a finding that may help to eliminate manual battery recharging in microsensors and mobile devices. ... Read more »

Lei Zhang, ., Oh, S., Ting Chong Wong, ., Chin Yaw Tan, ., & Kui Yao, . (2013) Piezoelectric polymer multilayer on flexible substrate for energy harvesting. IEEE Transactions on Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics and Frequency Control, 60(9), 2013-2020. DOI: 10.1109/TUFFC.2013.2786  

  • April 12, 2014
  • 05:59 AM
  • 65 views

Detailed regional data reduce warming-drought link doubts

by Andy Extance in Simple Climate

In Portugal and Spain climate change has already driven over 2°C of warming in summer, and new findings from Sergio Vicente-Serrano from the Pyrenean Institute of Ecology are dispelling uncertainties that the temperatures are making drought more severe and widespread. ... Read more »

Vicente-Serrano, S., Lopez-Moreno, J., Beguería, S., Lorenzo-Lacruz, J., Sanchez-Lorenzo, A., García-Ruiz, J., Azorin-Molina, C., Morán-Tejeda, E., Revuelto, J., Trigo, R.... (2014) Evidence of increasing drought severity caused by temperature rise in southern Europe. Environmental Research Letters, 9(4), 44001. DOI: 10.1088/1748-9326/9/4/044001  

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