Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

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The mission of SMR is to objectively summarize and describe the clinical relevance of research articles related to basic science, translational research, and clinical research that may be relevant to students and professionals interested in sports medicine. Furthermore, SMR aims to provide a forum for clinicians, researchers, and students in sports medicine-related fields to discuss the clinical relevance of new research.

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  • February 25, 2015
  • 12:05 AM
  • 31 views

Consider the Landing Surface When Thinking About Landing Techniques

by Kyle Harris in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

College athletes have decreased quadriceps:hamstring activation ratio, increased peak hamstring activation, and increased trunk sway when landing on an unstable surface versus a stable surface.
... Read more »

  • February 18, 2015
  • 12:05 AM
  • 10 views

Fear and Exercise Importance in Returning from ACL Injury

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Fear of re-injury, exercise importance, and age are associated with return to activities after an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. ... Read more »

Gignac MA, Cao X, White LM, Hurtig M, Kunz M, & Marks PH. (2015) Perceived personal importance of exercise and fears of re-injury: a longitudinal study of psychological factors related to activity after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation, 4. info:/

  • February 16, 2015
  • 12:05 AM
  • 12 views

What’s the Real Story? Effect of Fatigue on Acromiohumeral Distance and Scapular Position

by Katie Reuther in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

After overhead shoulder fatigue, healthy individuals have an increase in acromiohumeral distance and altered scapular position, consistent with a protective, impingement-sparing situation.... Read more »

  • February 11, 2015
  • 12:05 AM
  • 82 views

Fatigue May Increase Anterior Tibial Translation

by Kyle Harris in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Following a fatiguing exercise protocol, participants showed increased anterior tibial translation, compressive force, and knee flexion range of motion during the transition from non-weight-bearing to weight-bearing. This illustrates an inability of the lower extremity muscles to stabilize the knee joint.... Read more »

  • February 4, 2015
  • 12:05 AM
  • 70 views

Mom or Dad’s Bad Knees May be Inheritable, but are They Inevitable?

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Specific genotypes that influence new blood vessel growth are more common among individuals with an anterior cruciate ligament tear.... Read more »

  • February 2, 2015
  • 12:05 AM
  • 105 views

No Strict Rest for the Weary or Concussed

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

For individuals 11 to 22 years of age, strict rest after a concussion had no added benefit compared to 1-2 days of rest before the stepwise program.... Read more »

  • January 28, 2015
  • 12:05 AM
  • 85 views

ACL Graft Type May Not Matter When Attempting to Improve Patient-Reported Outcome 2-Years Post-Surgery

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Three anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction techniques yield similar patient-reported and objective outcomes for up to 2 years after surgery. The one exception was joint laxity, which was better among patients who received a patellar tendon autograft instead of one of two hamstring techniques.... Read more »

  • January 26, 2015
  • 12:05 AM
  • 97 views

Minding the Gap: Connecting Pre-season Screenings with Prospective Injury Data

by Laura McDonald in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Anterior reach asymmetry larger than 4 cm on the Y Balance test was associated with increased risk of non-contact injury in a sample of collegiate athletes.... Read more »

  • January 21, 2015
  • 04:53 AM
  • 157 views

Hip Special Tests Add Little Diagnostic Value

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

There are many clinical special tests geared towards diagnosing labral tears and femoroacetabular impingement. Unfortunately, these tests are largely not helpful in confirming the presence of the pathology in population that is likely to have either.... Read more »

  • January 19, 2015
  • 12:05 AM
  • 102 views

Lystedt-Type Laws Are Effective in Assisting Concussion Management

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Legislation regulating pediatric concussion injury management seems to be effective. From 2009-20012 states with legislation had a 92% increase in concussion-related health care utilization while states without legislation had a 75% increase.... Read more »

  • January 14, 2015
  • 12:05 AM
  • 121 views

Oral Contraceptive Use May Help Prevent ACL Injury

by Kyle Harris in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Women who take oral contraceptives are less likely to sustain an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury than women who do not.... Read more »

  • January 7, 2015
  • 12:05 AM
  • 161 views

Thessaly Test is not Necessarily Value Added for Meniscal Diagnosis Accuracy

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

The Thessaly test is comparable in accuracy to a modified McMurray test in a group of patients with a high prevalence of meniscal tears. ... Read more »

  • January 5, 2015
  • 12:05 AM
  • 153 views

Flag on the Play! Youth Football Players Do Not Know Concussion Signs and Symptoms

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

While 75% of youth football athletes reported that they understood the dangers of concussions over 60% reported that they believe it is okay to continue to play after they sustained a hit to the head that elicited a headache as long as they did not lose consciousness. This suggests that this population needs further concussion education.... Read more »

McAllister-Deitrick, J., Covassin, T., & Gould, D. (2014) Sport-Related Concussion Knowledge Among Youth Football Players. Athletic Training , 6(6), 280-284. DOI: 10.3928/01484834-20141112-03  

  • December 30, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 179 views

Can Establishing a Baseline Presence of Pain in Baseball Players Aid Injury Prevention?

by Laura McDonald in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Healthy youth baseball players, despite actively competing in a summer league, reported arm pain and fatigue that resulted in a decline of enjoyment in the game and feeling encouraged to continue playing despite experiencing pain.... Read more »

Makhni, E., Morrow, Z., Luchetti, T., Mishra-Kalyani, P., Gualtieri, A., Lee, R., & Ahmad, C. (2014) Arm Pain in Youth Baseball Players: A Survey of Healthy Players. The American Journal of Sports Medicine. DOI: 10.1177/0363546514555506  

  • December 22, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 210 views

Biomarker SNTF May Be The Next New Concussion Diagnosis Tool

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Biomarkers in the blood, such as SNTF, are elevated for up to 6 days following a concussion compared with preseason levels. This marker may eventually be developed to determine diagnosis and prognosis after a concussion as well as guiding return-to-play decisions.... Read more »

  • December 19, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 211 views

FIFA11 Improves Performance and Reduces Injuries in Soccer

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

The FIFA11 program reduced injuries and improved functional performance. It is more effective if compliance and adherence are high, both of which are better if a coach educated on the program administers the program to the team.... Read more »

Barengo, N., Meneses-Echávez, J., Ramírez-Vélez, R., Cohen, D., Tovar, G., & Bautista, J. (2014) The Impact of the FIFA 11 Training Program on Injury Prevention in Football Players: A Systematic Review. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 11(11), 11986-12000. DOI: 10.3390/ijerph111111986  

  • December 17, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 163 views

Some More Education on Exertional Heat Stroke Could go a Long Way

by Kyle Harris in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

While multiple certifications exist for strength and conditioning coaches, both the CSCS and SCCC do not adequately prepare coaches to recognize or prevent exertional heat stroke during high-intensity training sessions.... Read more »

  • December 15, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 174 views

Returning to play in the same season following a traumatic shoulder dislocation or subluxation. Is it worth the risk?

by Catherine E. Lewis and Adam B. Rosen, PhD, ATC in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Returning the same season from a traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation or subluxation likely results in additional episodes of instability even after undergoing a strengthening and stability protocol. Self-report questionnaires immediately after initial injury may be useful in determining a return to play timeline.... Read more »

Dickens, J., Owens, B., Cameron, K., Kilcoyne, K., Allred, C., Svoboda, S., Sullivan, R., Tokish, J., Peck, K., & Rue, J. (2014) Return to Play and Recurrent Instability After In-Season Anterior Shoulder Instability: A Prospective Multicenter Study. The American Journal of Sports Medicine, 42(12), 2842-2850. DOI: 10.1177/0363546514553181  

  • December 10, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 189 views

Knee or Hip Strengthening Improves Patellofemoral Pain

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

A randomized clinical trial revealed that 6 week rehabilitation protocols focusing on either hip/core or knee strengthening both improve symptoms associated with patellofemoral pain. ... Read more »

  • December 8, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 175 views

Athletes Rely on Athletic Trainers for Social Support Following Injury

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

More than 80% of injured college athletes reported social support from their athletic trainers during their recovery, and athletes reporting higher levels of satisfaction with the social support from their athletic trainers were less likely to report depression or anxiety at return to play.... Read more »

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