Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

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The mission of SMR is to objectively summarize and describe the clinical relevance of research articles related to basic science, translational research, and clinical research that may be relevant to students and professionals interested in sports medicine. Furthermore, SMR aims to provide a forum for clinicians, researchers, and students in sports medicine-related fields to discuss the clinical relevance of new research.

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  • August 13, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 60 views

Make Sure You Charge That Phone Before Measuring Anterior Tibial Translation

by Kyle Harris in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

A mobile phone arthrometer application may be a reliable alternative to the KT-1000 when measuring anterior tibial translation following an anterior cruciate ligament injury.... Read more »

Andrea, F., Luigi, V., Daniele, M., Luca, M., Paolo, I., Giovanni, G., Fabio, C., & Raffaele, I. (2014) Smartphone versus knee ligament arthrometer when size does not matter. International Orthopaedics. DOI: 10.1007/s00264-014-2432-9  

  • August 11, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 103 views

Emergency Room Visits for Sports Injuries

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Take Home Message: Sports-related injuries among teenagers accounts for over 430,000 emergency room visits in the United States in 2008 and represent a significant financial burden to the healthcare system.

Sports-related injuries in teenagers result in a significant number of emergency room visits, which can result in relatively large direct costs. However, little is known about national estimates of how many emergency room visits actually occur as well as the direct costs affiliated ........ Read more »

Nalliah RP, Anderson IM, Lee MK, Rampa S, Allareddy V, & Allareddy V. (2014) Epidemiology of Hospital-Based Emergency Department Visits Due to Sports Injuries. Pediatric Emergency Care, 30(8), 511-515. PMID: 25062295  

  • August 6, 2014
  • 12:04 AM
  • 116 views

Female Athletic Trainers Balancing Life and Motherhood

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Female mentors/role models who are successfully maintaining work-life balance are critical to the success and retention of quality female athletic trainers at the NCAA Division I level.... Read more »

  • August 4, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 136 views

Concussion Indicators of a Phenomenon Yet to be Defined

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Prevalent and consistent indicators of a concussion include observing disorientation or confusion immediately after the injury, and slower reaction time, poor balance, and impaired verbal learning and memory within 2 days after the injury.... Read more »

Carney N, Ghajar J, Jagoda A, Bedrick S, Davis-OʼReilly C, du Coudray H, Hack D, Helfand N, Huddleston A, Nettleton T.... (2014) Concussion guidelines step 1: systematic review of prevalent indicators. Neurosurgery. PMID: 25006974  

  • July 30, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 71 views

The Devil Is In The Details…If You Can Get The Details Out

by Kyle Harris in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Over 75% of surveyed collegiate athletes, who believed they sustained a concussion in the past year, reported not seeking proper medical attention for that concussion. The most common reason athletes reported not seeking proper medical attention was not believing the concussion was severe enough to warrant stopping the activity to seek out a medical professional.... Read more »

  • July 23, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 102 views

Despite the Hype: Many Former NFL Athletes May Have Normal Neurological Function and Structure

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Neuropsychological impairments were found in some retired NFL players; however, the majority of retired NFL players had no clinical signs of chronic brain damage. Some retired players had lesions found on brain imaging tests and these were associated with the number of previous concussions.... Read more »

  • July 21, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 133 views

It’s Only One Little Muscle Group…The Impact of Lumbar Multifidus Size on Lower Extremity Injury

by Mark A. Sutherlin in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Smaller lumbar multifidus size during preseason and the competitive season was associated with lower extremity injury in Australian Football. Additionally, lumbar multifidus asymmetry, limb kicking dominance and a history of low back pain were also associated with increased lower extremity injury.... Read more »

Hides, J., Stanton, W., Mendis, M., Franettovich Smith, M., & Sexton, M. (2014) Small Multifidus Muscle Size Predicts Football Injuries. Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, 2(6). DOI: 10.1177/2325967114537588  

  • July 16, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 97 views

Feel Like Phoning-In Your Concussion Symptoms? Not so Fast

by Kyle Harris in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Athletes who have sustained a concussion exhibit a wide range of symptom severity scores when surveyed through text-messaging at various times during the day.... Read more »

  • July 14, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 123 views

Pitching: We Can Have too Much of a Good Thing

by Mark Rice in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Young pitchers who engage in “risk-prone” pitching activities are more likely to report arm tiredness and pain, which is related to shoulder and elbow injuries.... Read more »

Yang, J., Mann, B., Guettler, J., Dugas, J., Irrgang, J., Fleisig, G., & Albright, J. (2014) Risk-Prone Pitching Activities and Injuries in Youth Baseball: Findings From a National Sample. The American Journal of Sports Medicine, 42(6), 1456-1463. DOI: 10.1177/0363546514524699  

  • July 9, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 99 views

If You’re Not Using the SCAT-2 For On-Field Concussion Diagnosis Maybe You Should Be

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

The SCAT-2 tool composite score is useful in sports-related concussion assessment in a college setting due to its high sensitivity and specificity especially if you can compare a post injury score with a baseline measure.... Read more »

  • July 2, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 140 views

What’s Really Causing Those Knee Stability Deficits Following an ACL Reconstruction?

by Kyle Harris in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) rehabilitation patients continue to experience muscular strength and stability deficits in the affected limb compared with the unaffected limb. This is potentially caused by the loss of neuromuscular control following ACLR and the rehabilitation process.... Read more »

  • June 23, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 116 views

How Much is Too Much? Defining Nonprescription Pain Medication Misuse

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Division II and III athletes use and misuse nonprescription pain medication for sports-related pain less often compared with Division 1-A football athletes.... Read more »

  • June 13, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 174 views

Hip Impingement is More Prevalent in Semiprofessional Male Soccer Players

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Take Home Message: Male semiprofessional soccer athletes have a higher prevalence of femoracetabular impingement (as measured by alpha angle) than male amateur soccer athletes.... Read more »

  • June 11, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 122 views

Treat the Spine, Help the Shoulder

by Katie Reuther in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Take Home Message: Patients with shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS) who underwent a thoracic spine manipulation (TSM) had an immediate decrease in symptoms; however, no differences in scapular kinematics were identified.... Read more »

  • June 4, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 140 views

Does Your Level of Exercise Match Up Against Retired Elite Athletes?...Probably!

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Take Home Message: Athletes at a NCAA Division I institution demonstrate clinically important differences in exercise behavior compared with nonathletes; however, former athletes had similar exercise behaviors as nonathletes.... Read more »

Sorenson, S., Romano, R., Azen, S., Schroeder, E., & Salem, G. (2014) Life Span Exercise Among Elite Intercollegiate Student Athletes. Sports Health: A Multidisciplinary Approach. DOI: 10.1177/1941738114534813  

  • June 2, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 159 views

Cost, Another Factor to Consider When Deciding if Surgery is the Best Treatment Option

by Kyle Harris in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

An early ACL reconstruction may lead to lower cost than individuals with an optional delayed ACL reconstruction. While this may help clinicians counsel patients, caution should be exercised as little is understood about long-term effects of each option and these results represent societal cost and may not always be applicable to a specific patient.... Read more »

  • May 28, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 150 views

Know Your Genetics Before You Hit the Slopes

by Kyle Harris in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Elite-level alpine skiers with a family history of ACL injury are more likely to sustain an ACL injury themselves compared with skiers without a family history of an ACL injury. ... Read more »

  • May 21, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 188 views

Sudden Cardiac Arrest Incidence May Be Higher than Originally Estimated

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Male athletes have the highest risk for sudden cardiac arrest compared with non-athletes. Preventative measures should be targeted to this at-risk population, specifically in higher risk sports such as football and basketball. ... Read more »

  • May 19, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 161 views

Female Participation in Sports is Increasing Everywhere Except in Sports Medicine Research

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Female athletes are under-represented in sports and exercise medicine research. This could have widespread implications to the clinical setting if we don’t know whether certain risk factors or treatments affect males and females differently.... Read more »

  • May 14, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 173 views

MACI Results in Better Clinical Outcomes than Microfracture for Large Cartilage Lesions

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

At 2 years post-surgery, matrix-applied characterized autologous cultured chondrocytes had superior clinical outcomes compared with microfracture surgery for management of large cartilage lesions. Structurally there were no differences between this technique and microfracture at the same 2 year follow-up point.... Read more »

Saris, D., Price, A., Widuchowski, W., Bertrand-Marchand, M., Caron, J., Drogset, J., Emans, P., Podskubka, A., Tsuchida, A., Kili, S.... (2014) Matrix-Applied Characterized Autologous Cultured Chondrocytes Versus Microfracture: Two-Year Follow-up of a Prospective Randomized Trial. The American Journal of Sports Medicine. DOI: 10.1177/0363546514528093  

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