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  • April 25, 2015
  • 06:40 AM
  • 1 view

Puppy-Dog Eyes Release Love Hormone

by Agnese Mariotti in United Academics

Gazing between pets and owners releases oxytocin, neurologically strengthening their bond. ... Read more »

Nagasawa, M., Mitsui, S., En, S., Ohtani, N., Ohta, M., Sakuma, Y., Onaka, T., Mogi, K., & Kikusui, T. (2015) Oxytocin-gaze positive loop and the coevolution of human-dog bonds. Science, 348(6232), 333-336. DOI: 10.1126/science.1261022  

  • April 25, 2015
  • 03:27 AM
  • 8 views

Kids with autism: a highly [psychotropic] medicated group?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"In keeping with international studies this sample of children with ASD [autism spectrum disorder] was a highly medicated group."So said the results of the study reported by Kerry-Ann Louw and colleagues [1] back in 2013 who noted that approximately one quarter of their cohort were currently in receipt of "psychotropic medications". I don't want to linger too much on this topic given that such findings tally with other peer-reviewed reports including those with much larger partici........ Read more »

  • April 24, 2015
  • 04:19 PM
  • 26 views

Diabetes drug found in freshwater potential cause of intersex fish

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

A medication commonly taken for Type II diabetes, which is being found in freshwater systems worldwide, has been shown to cause intersex in fish –or male fish that produce eggs. The study determined exposure to the diabetes medicine metformin causes physical changes in male fish exposed to doses similar to the amount in wastewater effluent.... Read more »

  • April 24, 2015
  • 01:55 PM
  • 25 views

Hubble's 25th anniversary

by Perikis Livas in Chilon

Δεδομένης της ολοκλήρωσης των 25 χρόνων λειτουργίας του, παρουσιάζονται μερικές από τις σημαντ&iota........ Read more »

Periklis D. Livas. (2015) Hubble's 25th anniversary. Chilon. info:/

  • April 24, 2015
  • 11:29 AM
  • 23 views

Classic Story, A City Corpse Meets a Country Corpse

by Katy Meyers Emery in Bones Don't Lie

I’ve been indulging in a little HGTV this week as a way to recover from post-conference exhaustion. I know that shows like House Hunters aren’t real- they already have bought […]... Read more »

  • April 24, 2015
  • 09:51 AM
  • 23 views

Marmoset Parents Teach Their Kids Not to Interrupt

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish



No one expects a human infant to slide into the world with a good grasp of grammar. Marmosets, another kind of chatty primate, are also poor conversationalists when they're young. But their parents seem to teach them how it's done. Young marmosets learn the cardinal rule of having a conversation: don't interrupt. And if they mess up, their parents give them the silent treatment.

Common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) live in large family groups in the forests of Brazil. "Because marmosets ... Read more »

Chow, C., Mitchell, J., & Miller, C. (2015) Vocal turn-taking in a non-human primate is learned during ontogeny. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 282(1807), 20150069-20150069. DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2015.0069  

  • April 24, 2015
  • 07:12 AM
  • 29 views

Momnesia: Does Pregnancy Really Change The Brain?

by Rebekah Morrow in United Academics

Pregnancy does cause brain alterations, but scientists still disagree about other factors.... Read more »

Standtlander, L. (2013) Memory and Perceptual Changes during Pregnancy. International Journal of Childbirth, 28(2). info:/

  • April 24, 2015
  • 07:12 AM
  • 27 views

Momnesia: Does Pregnancy Really Change The Brain?

by Rebekah Morrow in United Academics

Pregnancy does cause brain alterations, but scientists still disagree about other factors.... Read more »

Standtlander, L. (2013) Memory and Perceptual Changes during Pregnancy. International Journal of Childbirth, 28(2). info:/

  • April 24, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 23 views

“I know I shouldn’t text from the toilet,  but….”

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

People take selfies at funerals and text during sex. Others text while in the shower or while using the toilet (which apparently is not just for newspapers and books any longer). And wherever there are social faux pas’ you can bet academic researchers are not far behind. In fact, today we have research on just […]

Related posts:
Be careful what you text!
Let’s see if you can text him from jail…
When the defendant texts the juror…


... Read more »

  • April 24, 2015
  • 04:59 AM
  • 23 views

Will climate change affect competitive relationships between species?

by sceintists from the Marine group at CEES in Marine Science blog




Climate warming is known to affect predator-prey relationship and phenology. Less is known about competitive relationships specifically in a nonlinear framework. In a recent study, we studied this topic on…


passerine birds.

... Read more »

Stenseth, N., Durant, J., Fowler, M., Matthysen, E., Adriaensen, F., Jonzen, N., Chan, K., Liu, H., De Laet, J., Sheldon, B.... (2015) Testing for effects of climate change on competitive relationships and coexistence between two bird species. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 282(1807), 20141958-20141958. DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2014.1958  

Saetre, G., Post, E., & Kral, M. (1999) Can environmental fluctuation prevent competitive exclusion in sympatric flycatchers?. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 266(1425), 1247-1251. DOI: 10.1098/rspb.1999.0770  

  • April 24, 2015
  • 04:44 AM
  • 32 views

DSM-5 impacting on autism numbers

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"Consistent with previous reviews, the majority of included studies indicated between 50 and 75 % of individuals will maintain diagnoses."That was one of the conclusions reached by Isaac Smith and colleagues [1] following their systematic review of studies comparing DSM-IV and DSM-5 criteria for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and what the changes mean for eligibility for the label.Authors further reported that: "the greatest decreases [were] among high-functioning populations with IQs over ........ Read more »

  • April 23, 2015
  • 06:25 PM
  • 40 views

Scientists create worlds first genetically modified human embryos

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

A funny thing happened on the way to the publisher. In a world first, China has successfully created genetically modified human embryos. It was certainly an amazing piece of science, but the paper was rejected by both Nature and Science. Not because the study was flawed, or because the data was falsified, the paper was rejected for ethical reasons.... Read more »

Liang, P., Xu, Y., Zhang, X., Ding, C., Huang, R., Zhang, Z., Lv, J., Xie, X., Chen, Y., Li, Y.... (2015) CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene editing in human tripronuclear zygotes. Protein . DOI: 10.1007/s13238-015-0153-5  

  • April 23, 2015
  • 02:53 PM
  • 36 views

Whooping cough: A small drop in vaccine protection can lead to a case upsurge

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

In 2012 the USA saw the highest number of pertussis (whooping cough) cases since 1955. New research finds that a likely explanation for this rise in disease is a drop in the degree of vaccine protection for each vaccinated individual. The team worked with 60 years of pertussis disease data to determine what best explained the recent increase in the disease.... Read more »

Gambhir M, Clark TA, Cauchemez S, Tartof SY, Swerdlow DL, & Ferguson NM. (2015) A Change in Vaccine Efficacy and Duration of Protection Explains Recent Rises in Pertussis Incidence in the United States. PLOS Computational Biology. info:/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1004138

  • April 23, 2015
  • 12:45 PM
  • 55 views

In the face of discrimination, non-believers commit more strongly to their atheism

by Tom Rees in Epiphenom

It’s widely recognised that atheists are one of the most marginalised groups in the USA. As you might imagine, this can cause all sorts of problems for non-believers. But might it also help explain why the public face of atheism in the USA is so stridently vocal? Many American atheists are passionate about their identity as [Read More...]... Read more »

  • April 23, 2015
  • 10:35 AM
  • 36 views

of microwave noodles and extragalactic signals

by Greg Fish in weird things

FRBs just can’t seem to catch a break this month. First, they were an alien signal. Then just as quickly as they were attributed to aliens because the Daily Fail decided to get creative with two out of context words and no one seemed to bother to fact check them, the bursts were called a false signal caused by microwave interference. Not just any microwave interference mind you, but the kind in which you warm up leftovers [...]... Read more »

E. Petroff, E. F. Keane, E. D. Barr, J. E. Reynolds, J. Sarkissian, P. G. Edwards, J. Stevens, C. Brem, A. Jameson, S. Burke-Spolaor.... (2015) Identifying the source of perytons at the Parkes radio telescope. n/a. arXiv: 1504.02165v1

  • April 23, 2015
  • 09:33 AM
  • 27 views

Stressed to Death: Overcoming Drug-Resistance in Malaria Parasites

by Lauren Richardson in PLOS Biologue

In recent decades the burden of malaria has greatly decreased. This is the result of both successful public health initiatives and widespread use of antimalarial therapeutics. Artemisinins are a family of drugs that have been incredibly effective against Plasmodium falciparum … Continue reading »... Read more »

Dogovski, C., Xie, S., Burgio, G., Bridgford, J., Mok, S., McCaw, J., Chotivanich, K., Kenny, S., Gnädig, N., Straimer, J.... (2015) Targeting the Cell Stress Response of Plasmodium falciparum to Overcome Artemisinin Resistance. PLOS Biology, 13(4). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.1002132  

  • April 23, 2015
  • 08:40 AM
  • 42 views

And I Keep Hitting Re-peat-peat-peat-peat-peat-peat

by Sarah Deffit in The 'Scope

Why do we do the things we do? Knowing the science behind bad habits may help you to break them. ... Read more »

Graybiel AM. (2008) Habits, rituals, and the evaluative brain. Annual review of neuroscience, 359-87. PMID: 18558860  

Quinn JM, Pascoe A, Wood W, & Neal DT. (2010) Can't control yourself? Monitor those bad habits. Personality , 36(4), 499-511. PMID: 20363904  

Yin HH, & Knowlton BJ. (2006) The role of the basal ganglia in habit formation. Nature reviews. Neuroscience, 7(6), 464-76. PMID: 16715055  

  • April 23, 2015
  • 08:00 AM
  • 29 views

Two Species of Cottonmouths? This Scientist Says Yes!

by David Steen in Living Alongside Wildlife







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Burbrink, F. T., & Guiher, T. J. (2015) Considering gene flow when using coalescent methods to delimit lineages of North American pitvipers of the genus Agkistrodon. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, 173(2), 505-526. info:/

  • April 23, 2015
  • 07:28 AM
  • 40 views

Men and boys with older sisters are less competitive

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

One of the longest-debated and most studied issues in psychology is whether and how our personalities are affected by our birth order and the sex of our siblings. A problem with much previous research is that it's depended on people self-reporting their own personality, or on siblings or parents providing the personality ratings. These ratings are prone to subjectivity and skewed by people's expectations about how, say, a younger sibling ought to behave.A new study focused on one particular find........ Read more »

Okudaira, H., Kinari, Y., Mizutani, N., Ohtake, F., & Kawaguchi, A. (2015) Older sisters and younger brothers: The impact of siblings on preference for competition. Personality and Individual Differences, 81-89. DOI: 10.1016/j.paid.2015.02.037  

  • April 23, 2015
  • 01:46 AM
  • 44 views

Does maternal asthma 'prime' for offspring neurodevelopmental disorder?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The paper from Jared Schwartzer and colleagues [1] (open-access) including a couple of familiar names on the authorship list (Charity Onore and Paul Ashwood) caught my attention recently. Based on mouse studies and the artificial induction of maternal allergy/asthma in pregnant mice, researchers reported that: "Activation of the maternal immune system with an allergy/asthma insult significantly perturbed developmental growth and species-typical behaviors in offspring." Further that the........ Read more »

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