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  • September 15, 2014
  • 04:50 PM
  • 72 views

Religion And Morality: Belief Isn't Better

by Alexis Delanoir in How to Paint Your Panda

It's no secret that when it comes to what the public thinks, atheists are usually at the bottom of the "nice" list. A survey in 2006 found that atheists were the least trusted minority group in America. Similar studies find that atheists are mistrusted and are seen as more immoral than their religious counterparts. But are these views justified? A new study by Hofmann et al. (2014) suggests they aren't, and this conclusion is consistent with other available data.... Read more »

Gervais WM, Shariff AF, & Norenzayan A. (2011) Do you believe in atheists? Distrust is central to anti-atheist prejudice. Journal of personality and social psychology, 101(6), 1189-206. PMID: 22059841  

Hofmann W, Wisneski DC, Brandt MJ, & Skitka LJ. (2014) Morality in everyday life. Science (New York, N.Y.), 345(6202), 1340-3. PMID: 25214626  

  • September 14, 2014
  • 10:03 AM
  • 54 views

Sound Aggression

by Rodney Steadman in Gravity's Pull

Maybe it was all the Who noise that made the Grinch so aggressive. Recent research out of Bulgaria suggests a link between noise pollution and displaced aggression.... Read more »

  • September 10, 2014
  • 11:36 AM
  • 81 views

Altruism and AlAnon: in helping we are helped

by DJMac in Recovery Review

“Giving implies to make the other person a giver also.” So said Eric Fromm whose quote starts this research paper which travels to the heart of mutual aid. The clear message? In helping other, we help ourselves. The recovery saying “We only keep what we have by giving it away” hits the mark in this respect. What [...]
The post Altruism and AlAnon: in helping we are helped appeared first on Recovery Review.
... Read more »

  • September 10, 2014
  • 09:40 AM
  • 82 views

Midi-chlorians gave Jedi knights their power. Is there something like this on Earth?

by Bill Sullivan in The 'Scope

A strange and provocative paper by Alexander Panchin and colleagues proposes an unorthodox new idea called the “biomeme hypothesis”, which posits that the impulse behind some religious rituals could be driven by mind-altering parasites.... Read more »

  • September 7, 2014
  • 10:03 AM
  • 72 views

Fist Bump, Don't Handshake

by Viputheshwar Sitaraman in Draw Science

Fist bumps minimize contact time and surface area, diminishing germ transfer in terms of greetings--especially compared to handshakes.... Read more »

  • September 6, 2014
  • 12:10 PM
  • 98 views

Women and sexual assault: Unfortunate news…

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

I was debating about this new study. On one hand it’s important to share all sorts of different findings. On the other hand, my faith in humanity was more than just a little shaken, but there is no point on sweeping it under the rug. So disturbing news for women on college campuses, a new study indicates that female college students who are victims of sexual assault are at a much higher risk of becoming victims again. Please hold your disgust till the end…... Read more »

  • September 6, 2014
  • 06:26 AM
  • 109 views

“Cyranoids”: Stanley Milgram’s Creepiest Experiment

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

Imagine that someone else was controlling your actions. You would still look like you, and sound like you, but you wouldn’t be the one deciding what you did and what you said. Now consider: would anyone notice the difference? In this nightmarish scenario, you would be a “cyranoid” – in the terminology introduced by psychologist […]The post “Cyranoids”: Stanley Milgram’s Creepiest Experiment appeared first on Neuroskeptic.... Read more »

  • September 4, 2014
  • 11:41 AM
  • 32 views

Internet addresses are running out in Asia!

by Wiley Asia Blog in Wiley Asia Blog - Social Science

Internet addresses are "the numbers that uniquely identify computers and devices on the Internet". Although the current version of the Internet Protocol known as IPv4 provides 4.3 billion addresses, "they have already begun to run out". Computer experts created another Internet Protocol version in mid-1990s which is known as IPv6 that can provide "nearly infinite address space". The challenge, however, is that "IPv6 Internet is not backwards compatible with the........ Read more »

Liv Coleman. (2014) Next Generation Internet Policy in Japan, China and India . Asia . info:/

  • September 2, 2014
  • 10:41 AM
  • 88 views

Pigeon Gamblers Treat Risk Just Like Humans Do

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish

If you watch poker coverage on television, you probably won’t hear the commentators compare players to pigeons. Maybe they should. The birds don’t play a great game of hold ‘em, but the way they think about risk might be strikingly similar to the way we do. Researchers discovered this by putting humans and birds through […]The post Pigeon Gamblers Treat Risk Just Like Humans Do appeared first on Inkfish.... Read more »

Ludvig EA, Madan CR, Pisklak JM, & Spetch ML. (2014) Reward context determines risky choice in pigeons and humans. Biology letters, 10(8). PMID: 25165453  

  • August 31, 2014
  • 11:31 PM
  • 108 views

August lives up to its definition: respected and impressive

by Cobb & Hecht in Do You Believe In Dog?

The things we noticed in and around canine science over the past two weeks, Storified in one neat location for your convenience:[View the story "Do You Believe in Dog? [16-31 August 2014]" on Storify] Further reading:Feuerbacher E.N. (2014). Shut up and pet me! Domestic dogs (Canis lupus familiaris) prefer petting to vocal praise in concurrent and single-alternative choice procedures, Behavioural Processes, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.beproc.2014.08.019 Gygax L. (2014). The A to Z of sta........ Read more »

  • August 31, 2014
  • 05:20 PM
  • 91 views

Heroin’s Anthrax Problem

by Rebecca Kreston in BODY HORRORS

Anthrax is a deadly disease with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Because it is, thankfully, also quite rare, it is relatively easy to track its whereabouts and going-ons when an outbreak occurs. Typically, outbreaks of anthrax have been traced to groups of people involved in high-risk activities involving grazing animals and their byproducts: anthrax favors shepherds, butchers, wool-sorters, leather workers, and even the odd drum-playing hippies. In 2009, however, an outbreak upended this........ Read more »

  • August 30, 2014
  • 08:12 AM
  • 103 views

The Myth Of “Roid Rage”?

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

Are men who inject testosterone and other anabolic steroids at risk of entering a violent “roid rage“? Many people think so. Whenever a professional athlete commits a violent crime, it’s not long before someone suggests that steroids may have been involved. The most recent example of this is the case of Jonathan “War Machine” Koppenhaver. […]The post The Myth Of “Roid Rage”? appeared first on Neuroskeptic.... Read more »

  • August 29, 2014
  • 03:10 PM
  • 98 views

The Ever Mutating Ebola Virus

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Ebola has a nasty reputation for the way it damages the body. It's rightfully earned when you look at the death rate. But when you look at the actual details of an Ebola infection, a surprising fact surfaces: The virus isn't what ends up killing you, it's your own immune system. Sure they are trying different ways to outsmart the virus, but it's mutating... quickly. In fact, scientists have rapidly sequenced and analyzed more than 99 Ebola virus genomes. The hope it to better understand the enem........ Read more »

Gire, S., Goba, A., Andersen, K., Sealfon, R., Park, D., Kanneh, L., Jalloh, S., Momoh, M., Fullah, M., Dudas, G.... (2014) Genomic surveillance elucidates Ebola virus origin and transmission during the 2014 outbreak. Science. DOI: 10.1126/science.1259657  

  • August 28, 2014
  • 07:56 AM
  • 166 views

Feminism Not Funny? Women In American Sitcoms

by Nura Rutten in United Academics

Compared to the beginning of the sitcom-area, in the 1950′s/1960′s, the roles of women and men sometimes seem to be reversed. However, in every sitcom, the woman who wants to be funny has only two options.... Read more »

  • August 26, 2014
  • 07:51 PM
  • 128 views

Needles in a haystack: questioning the “fluidity” of ELF

by Ray Carey in ELFA project

As I’ve earlier argued on this blog, sometimes the claims of “fluidity”, “diversity”, and “innovation” found in English as a lingua franca (ELF) research are overstated. It’s so diverse that even ordinary diversity won’t do – it’s “super-diversity” now. It could very well be ultra-mega-diversity-squared, but the question of the prominence of these presumably innovative […]... Read more »

  • August 25, 2014
  • 01:00 AM
  • 126 views

Does Nature Influence How We Think?

by Rodney Steadman in Gravity's Pull

Connectedness with nature may influence cognitive styles.... Read more »

  • August 24, 2014
  • 03:06 PM
  • 144 views

Correcting the Critics of Nicholas Wade & MAOA

by nooffensebut in The Unsilenced Science

Geneticists are not the leading experts on behavioral genetics, and they and other critics have made numerous errors and misjudgments about Nicholas Wade’s book A Troublesome Inheritance, as well as MAOA or warrior gene research.... Read more »

Bevilacqua L, Doly S, Kaprio J, Yuan Q, Tikkanen R, Paunio T, Zhou Z, Wedenoja J, Maroteaux L, Diaz S.... (2010) A population-specific HTR2B stop codon predisposes to severe impulsivity. Nature, 468(7327), 1061-6. PMID: 21179162  

Cases O, Seif I, Grimsby J, Gaspar P, Chen K, Pournin S, Müller U, Aguet M, Babinet C, & Shih JC. (1995) Aggressive behavior and altered amounts of brain serotonin and norepinephrine in mice lacking MAOA. Science (New York, N.Y.), 268(5218), 1763-6. PMID: 7792602  

Tuinier S, Verhoeven WMA, Scherders MJWT, Fekkes D, & Pepplinkhuizen L. (1995) Neuropsychiatric and biological characteristics of X-linked MAO-A deficiency syndrome. A single case intervention study. New Trends in Experimental and Clinical Psychiatry, 99-107. info:/

Zhu B, Chen C, Moyzis R, Dong Q, Chen C, He Q, Li J, Lei X, & Lin C. (2012) Association between the HTR2B gene and the personality trait of fun seeking. Personality and Individual Differences, 53(8), 1029-1033. DOI: 10.1016/j.paid.2012.07.026  

  • August 23, 2014
  • 03:04 PM
  • 151 views

Pseudoscience And Ad Hominems: Is Religion a Mental Illness?

by Alexis Delanoir in How to Paint Your Panda

Many anti-theists claim that religion is a mental illness or a mental disorder, sometimes linking it to schizophrenia, and thus state it should be treated as such. Is it, though? Claiming that religion is a mental disorder does nothing for productive discussion in the fields of theology and philosophy, and is simply incorrect. In this post, I examine the arguments made by proponents of this hypothesis and rebut them, citing the DSM-V and relevant scientific literature.... Read more »

Siddle, R., Haddock, G., Tarrier, N., & Faragher, E. (2014) Religious delusions in patients admitted to hospital with schizophrenia. Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, 37(3), 130-138. DOI: 10.1007/s001270200005  

  • August 21, 2014
  • 01:02 PM
  • 131 views

Jonas Salk and the Polio Comeback

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Jonas Salk, you should know this name, but chances are you don’t. He was the inventor of the polio vaccine, a disease that was feared more than the atomic bomb. Today we don’t think about it, no one “gets” polio anymore. Scientists get a bad rap today with the whole “autism-vaccine” BS. But they don’t know Salk, instead of making a small [see: huge] fortune from the drug, he refused to patent it and gave it to the people for essentially free. You think this story would have a happy........ Read more »

Drexler JF, Grard G, Lukashev AN, Kozlovskaya LI, Böttcher S, Uslu G, Reimerink J, Gmyl AP, Taty-Taty R, Lekana-Douki SE.... (2014) Robustness against serum neutralization of a poliovirus type 1 from a lethal epidemic of poliomyelitis in the Republic of Congo in 2010. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. PMID: 25136105  

  • August 21, 2014
  • 02:21 AM
  • 135 views

Do You Believe in Dog? A New Ball Game

by Cobb & Hecht in Do You Believe In Dog?

Hello Do You Believe in Dog(ers)!(source)After two years of mostly pen-pal style blogging, we're excited to share our new direction!When we first decided to create Do You Believe in Dog?, we committed to blogging back and forth about canine science for two years. We were able to celebrate achieving that goal at the recent 4th Canine Science Forum in Lincoln, UK and also reflect on the future of Do You Believe in Dog?The DYBID blog, Facebook and Twitter feeds have become vibrant places to ac........ Read more »

Fischhoff B., & Scheufele D. (2013) The science of science communication. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 110(Supplement 3), 14033-14039. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1213273110  

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