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  • February 25, 2015
  • 03:38 PM
  • 104 views

The food additive that may be promoting obesity and metabolic syndrome

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

People say to avoid processed foods, while I don’t agree with that fully, a new study suggests that a common food additive may be causing problems. Emulsifiers, which are added to most processed foods to aid texture and extend shelf life, can alter the gut microbiota composition and localization to induce intestinal inflammation that promotes the development of inflammatory bowel disease and metabolic syndrome.... Read more »

  • February 24, 2015
  • 05:14 PM
  • 42 views

Is belief in moral progress a substitute for religion?

by Tom Rees in Epiphenom

There’s a well studied phenomenon called Terror Management Theory which basically says that, when people are reminded of their own death, their beliefs change in certain predictable ways.  People cling more strongly to beliefs that make the future seem more controllable and comfortable – and that includes turning to religion (see: Religion, Patriotism and Death). [Read More...]... Read more »

Rutjens, B., van Harreveld, F., van der Pligt, J., van Elk, M., & Pyszczynski, T. (2014) A march to a better world? Religiosity and the existential function of belief in social-moral progress. The International Journal for the Psychology of Religion, 1-33. DOI: 10.1080/10508619.2014.990345  

  • February 24, 2015
  • 04:38 PM
  • 53 views

Move over oil, new pretreatment could cut biofuel costs by 30 percent or more

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Alternative fuels have a few large problems making them horrible options over oil (which is already a horrible choice). However, researchers may have finally eliminated one of those problems, cost. The team has invented a novel pretreatment technology that could cut the cost of biofuels production by about 30 percent or more by dramatically reducing the amount of enzymes needed to breakdown the raw materials that form biofuels.... Read more »

  • February 24, 2015
  • 10:56 AM
  • 53 views

A Few Citizen Scientists Do Most of the Work

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish



Nothing turns your internet procrastination time into feelings of goodwill and teamwork like a citizen science project. You can click through a set of penguin photos or moon craters and know that your data are contributing to real science. As more citizens take part, and more researchers discover the joys of free labor, these projects are gaining popularity. But not all citizen scientists pull their weight. In fact, most do nearly nothing.

Henry Sauermann, a management professor at the G........ Read more »

Sauermann, H., & Franzoni, C. (2015) Crowd science user contribution patterns and their implications. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 112(3), 679-684. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1408907112  

  • February 23, 2015
  • 09:20 PM
  • 53 views

Exercise Medicine is Ancient History

by Rodney Steadman in Gravity's Pull

Exercise was used as medicine at least 2600 years ago.... Read more »

  • February 22, 2015
  • 11:50 PM
  • 62 views

Teaching: So Easy a "Housewife" Could Do It?

by Joshua Fisher in Text Savvy

Two years before the United States put men on the moon, William James Popham and colleagues conducted two very interesting—and to a reader in the 21st century, bizarre—education experiments in southern California which were designed to validate a test they had developed to measure what they called "teacher proficiency."... Read more »

  • February 20, 2015
  • 04:47 AM
  • 25 views

Dzieci jako dobra publiczne?

by Warsaw University of Life Sciences in Humus Economicus

Dziś na Hummusie kontynuować będziemy zagadnienie decyzji rodzinnych, tym razem z punktu widzenia społeczeństwa. Wyjątkowo będzie trochę prywaty. Po pierwsze, jest to temat, którym dawno, dawno temu zajmowałam się w swojej pracy magisterskiej1. Po drugie, inwestycją w potomstwo zajmuję się na co dzień, w czasie między doktoratem a blogiem. I w ramach podkreślenia wagi tej […]... Read more »

Nancy Folbre. (1994) Children as public goods. The American Economic Review, 84(2). info:/

  • February 18, 2015
  • 04:24 PM
  • 11 views

Does Science Produce Too Many PhD Graduates?

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

In a new paper, a group of MIT researchers argue that science is producing PhDs in far greater numbers than there are available tenured jobs for them to fill.



The authors, engineers Richard C. Larson, Navid Ghaffarzadegan, and Yi Xue, start out by noting that
The academic job market has become more and more competitive... nowadays, less than 17% of new PhDs in science, engineering and health-related fields find tenure-track positions within 3 years after graduation.
But why? Are we simp... Read more »

  • February 18, 2015
  • 06:23 AM
  • 84 views

Thrillers Affect Your Political Outlook

by Shai Simpson-Baikie in United Academics

Politically unrelated emotions we experience through movies and other daily events have a significant impact on our political outlook. Whether we realize it or not. ... Read more »

Renshon, J., Lee, J., & Tingley, D. (2014) Physiological Arousal and Political Beliefs. Political Psychology. DOI: 10.1111/pops.12173  

  • February 17, 2015
  • 02:26 PM
  • 97 views

Shopping while hungry leads to more non-food purchases

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Ever go shopping when you’re hungry and notice you walked out with a lot more than you were expecting to buy? While most people know that when you are hungry, you typically will buy more food (as illustrated by The Oatmeal above), new research shows that there is a clear link between hunger and buying non-food items. A team of international researchers has released a paper that describes five laboratory and field studies they conducted which showed how people respond to non-food objects when ........ Read more »

Alison Jing Xu, Norbert Schwarz, & Robert S. Wyer, Jr. (2015) Hunger promotes acquisition of nonfood objects. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. info:/10.1073/pnas.1417712112

  • February 16, 2015
  • 01:40 PM
  • 122 views

Surfing and Respite from PTSD

by Rodney Steadman in Gravity's Pull

Research by Caddick et al. (2014) shows that surfing can help combat veterans cope with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD).... Read more »

  • February 15, 2015
  • 01:09 PM
  • 136 views

Inequality in faculty placement

by neuroecology in Neuroecology

How does your PhD institution affect your chances at a faculty position? Across disciplines, we find steep prestige hierarchies, in which only 9 to 14% of faculty are placed at institutions more prestigious than their doctorate…Under a meritocracy, the observed … Continue reading →... Read more »

Clauset A, Arbesman S, & Larremore DB. (2015) Systematic inequality and hierarchy in faculty hiring networks. Science Advances. info:/

  • February 14, 2015
  • 06:36 PM
  • 119 views

A very Sciencey Valentine’s day

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Happy valentines day! Okay maybe it’s turned into more of a reason to spend money on chocolate and flowers than it is about showing affection — which is probably why some people hate it — but it can still be a somewhat special day. Unfortunately I’ve been struggling on what I could do for my wife on valentines day. So I thought I would work it out here and maybe even help a few of you who are stuck as well.... Read more »

  • February 13, 2015
  • 12:35 PM
  • 114 views

You Can Force Birds to Be Friends, but It Won't Stick

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish



As anyone who's made valentines for a whole elementary-school class knows, kids are often pushed into social groups not of their choosing. Scientists tried the same thing with wild birds and found it pretty easy to coax them into new cliques. The birds hung out with their new social circles even when they didn't have to. But once the experiment ended, those friendships dissolved faster than a candy conversation heart.

To create new social groups in birds, researchers essentially controlle... Read more »

  • February 12, 2015
  • 01:38 PM
  • 97 views

Will You Be My Valentine?: Making All the Right Moves

by Melissa Chernick in Science Storiented

My Valentine’s Day themed posts have been both popular and fun to write. In last year’s Getting a Date for Valentine’s Day series, you learned that you should wear something red, gaze without being creepy, tell a good joke before walking up to your potential date who is preferably standing next to some flowers, and then open with a unique request to segue into asking them out. But that isn't the end of the story. Oh no, there are many more things that you can do to attract that special so........ Read more »

Brown, W., Cronk, L., Grochow, K., Jacobson, A., Liu, C., Popović, Z., & Trivers, R. (2005) Dance reveals symmetry especially in young men. Nature, 438(7071), 1148-1150. DOI: 10.1038/nature04344  

Neave, N., McCarty, K., Freynik, J., Caplan, N., Honekopp, J., & Fink, B. (2010) Male dance moves that catch a woman's eye. Biology Letters, 7(2), 221-224. DOI: 10.1098/rsbl.2010.0619  

Bale, C., Morrison, R., & Caryl, P. (2006) Chat-up lines as male sexual displays. Personality and Individual Differences, 40(4), 655-664. DOI: 10.1016/j.paid.2005.07.016  

Cooper, M., O’Donnell, D., Caryl, P., Morrison, R., & Bale, C. (2007) Chat-up lines as male displays: Effects of content, sex, and personality. Personality and Individual Differences, 43(5), 1075-1085. DOI: 10.1016/j.paid.2007.03.001  

  • February 12, 2015
  • 11:00 AM
  • 101 views

Happy Valentine's Day! What Is Love, Anyway?

by Bill Sullivan in The 'Scope

Just in time for Valentine's Day. What is love and why does it exist? Read how scientists have made great strides elucidating the evolutionary and biochemical basis for love.... Read more »

Love TM. (2014) Oxytocin, motivation and the role of dopamine. Pharmacology, biochemistry, and behavior, 49-60. PMID: 23850525  

Domingue, B., Fletcher, J., Conley, D., & Boardman, J. (2014) Genetic and educational assortative mating among US adults. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 111(22), 7996-8000. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1321426111  

  • February 11, 2015
  • 08:35 PM
  • 126 views

Music may reduce your ability to remember!

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Sometimes just turning on some background music really helps a person get things done. While music may help some people relax when they’re trying to concentrate, new research suggests that it doesn’t help them remember what they’re focusing on, especially as they get older.... Read more »

  • February 10, 2015
  • 10:00 PM
  • 113 views

Intuition and Domain Knowledge

by Joshua Fisher in Text Savvy

Can you guess what the graphs below show? I'll give you a couple of hints: (1) each graph measures performance on a different task, (2) one pair of bars in each graph—left or right—represents participants who used their intuition on the task, while the other pair of bars represents folks who used an analytical approach, and (3) one shading represents participants with low domain knowledge while the other represents participants with high domain knowledge (related to the actual t........ Read more »

  • February 10, 2015
  • 09:02 AM
  • 101 views

Moral Time: Does Our Internal Clock Influence Moral Judgments?

by Jalees Rehman in Fragments of Truth

Does morality depend on the time of the day? The study "The Morning Morality Effect: The Influence of Time of Day on Unethical Behavior" published in October of 2013 by Maryam Kouchaki and Isaac Smith suggested that people are more honest in the mornings, and that their ability to resist the temptation of lying and cheating wears off as the day progresses. In a series of experiments, Kouchaki and Smith found that moral awareness and self-control in their study subjects decreased in the........ Read more »

  • February 10, 2015
  • 02:17 AM
  • 91 views

A Theory of the Supply Chain

by Andreas Wieland in Supply Chain Management Research

In their very insightful essay, Toward the Theory of the Supply Chain, Carter, Rogers & Choi (2015) argue that “before we continue to build theories of supply chain management, we must first develop a theory of the supply chain – the phenomenon that we purport to manage”. I could not agree more with their argument. […]... Read more »

Carter, C.R., Rogers, D.S., & Choi, T.Y. (2015) Toward the Theory of the Supply Chain. Journal of Supply Chain Management. info:/10.1111/jscm.12073

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