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  • November 27, 2014
  • 12:40 PM
  • 9 views

Fragile X and a new autism treatment

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

There are many roads to autism, none of them involve vaccination. I get tired of saying that, but it’s simple science, vaccines do not cause autism. Thankfully science knows this and is looking at not only what actually causes autism (Since again there are many different ways to develop on the spectrum). Well they may have found a new treatment for people affected by a common inherited form of autism by using a drug that is being tested as a treatment for cancer.... Read more »

Gkogkas, C., Khoutorsky, A., Cao, R., Jafarnejad, S., Prager-Khoutorsky, M., Giannakas, N., Kaminari, A., Fragkouli, A., Nader, K., Price, T.... (2014) Pharmacogenetic Inhibition of eIF4E-Dependent Mmp9 mRNA Translation Reverses Fragile X Syndrome-like Phenotypes. Cell Reports. DOI: 10.1016/j.celrep.2014.10.064  

  • November 26, 2014
  • 03:20 PM
  • 44 views

Need to turn off the pain? Well now we can!

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

My sister suffers from chronic pain issues. I’ve written several posts about how her autoimmune disease is a special brand of pain that you will thankfully (almost certainly) never have to feel. While great strides have been made in pain management, there are still relatively few options that do not carry the risk of being extremely addictive. Well thankfully there is some new research and it offers hope, not just for my sister, but for the millions of people suffering from chronic pain that ........ Read more »

Little JW, Ford A, Symons-Liguori AM, Chen Z, Janes K, Doyle T, Xie J, Luongo L, Tosh DK, Maione S.... (2014) Endogenous adenosine A3 receptor activation selectively alleviates persistent pain states. Brain : a journal of neurology. PMID: 25414036  

  • November 25, 2014
  • 05:17 PM
  • 55 views

Blu-ray solar power

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

So here’s something you don’t see everyday. Blu-ray disks, you know the stuff we use for video games or DVDs also improve the performance of solar cells—suggesting a second use for unwanted discs—according to new research from Northwestern University. As surprising as this was, there is even better news, we know why they improve performance.... Read more »

  • November 24, 2014
  • 03:26 PM
  • 50 views

Hiding cells to prevent HIV transmission

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

The fight against HIV is ongoing and despite our rapid progression against the disease we still lack a cure or even adequate treatment for people infected. However, new research suggests that cloaking immune cells with antibodies that block T cell trafficking to the gut can substantially reduce the risk of viral transmission, at least in a non-human primate model of HIV infection. If it works out, this could help slow down the spread of HIV and give people a better shot at a normal life.... Read more »

  • November 22, 2014
  • 02:45 PM
  • 61 views

Mental Health- The invisible barrier for women’s care

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

A while back I wrote a post about mental health and jail sentences, it seems like no one takes mental health seriously and that leads to lack of care for the individual. Well a new study offers even more bad news on the mental health front. Women with symptoms of serious mental illness are significantly less likely to receive three routine cancer screenings – Pap tests, mammograms and clinical breast exams – than women in the general population, despite being at elevated risk for medical com........ Read more »

  • November 21, 2014
  • 06:39 PM
  • 81 views

Dogtober = Canine science in October

by Cobb & Hecht in Do You Believe In Dog?

What a BOOMING month for dogs and science October was! We've captured the links to all the latest blogs, research and news that caught out attention throughout Dog-tober.Thanks to Storify (click here if the you can't see the collection of links below) you can make sure you didn't miss out too.[View the story "Do You Believe in Dog? [01-31 October 2014]" on Storify] Further reading:Bradshaw J.W.S. & Nicola J. Rooney (2014). Why do adult dogs ‘play’?, Behavioural Processes, DOI: http:/........ Read more »

Bozkurt Alper, Barbara Sherman, Rita Brugarolas, Sean Mealin, John Majikes, Pu Yang, & Robert Loftin. (2014) Towards Cyber-Enhanced Working Dogs for Search and Rescue. IEEE Intelligent Systems, 1-1. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/mis.2014.77  

  • November 21, 2014
  • 04:54 PM
  • 73 views

The impact of powered prosthetic failures on the user

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Prosthetics have come a long way in a relatively short amount of time. With the ongoing wars in the middle east the need for better prosthetics technologies has become more apparent, to this end we now have prosthetics that will allow a person to "feel", we even have motorized prosthetics that will help allow a more fluid walk, but while powered lower limb prosthetics hold promise for improving the mobility of amputees, errors in the technology may also cause some users to stumble or fall. Becau........ Read more »

  • November 21, 2014
  • 04:09 PM
  • 65 views

EPA Clean Power Plan Explained!

by Jonathan Trinastic in Goodnight Earth

The EPA announced a plan to cut power plant emissions by 30% in about 15 years - get the details here!... Read more »

Fowlie, M., Goulder, L., Kotchen, M., Borenstein, S., Bushnell, J., Davis, L., Greenstone, M., Kolstad, C., Knittel, C., Stavins, R.... (2014) An economic perspective on the EPA's Clean Power Plan. Science, 346(6211), 815-816. DOI: 10.1126/science.1261349  

  • November 20, 2014
  • 04:21 PM
  • 76 views

Designing a better flu vaccine

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

We all hate getting sick and the seasonal flu vaccine can help prevent a time of serious illness. Unfortunately the vaccine is usually an educated guess as to which strains of the flu are going to be most prevalent that year. Well now an international team of researchers has shown that it may be possible to improve the effectiveness of the seasonal flu vaccine by 'pre-empting' the evolution of the influenza virus.... Read more »

Fonville, J., Wilks, S., James, S., Fox, A., Ventresca, M., Aban, M., Xue, L., Jones, T., Le N. M. H., ., Pham Q. T., .... (2014) Antibody landscapes after influenza virus infection or vaccination. Science, 346(6212), 996-1000. DOI: 10.1126/science.1256427  

  • November 19, 2014
  • 02:24 PM
  • 87 views

How gut microbiota changes the blood-brain barrier

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Don’t be alarmed, but we are outnumbered. When figuring out what makes us, “us” we need to remember that there are far more bacteria genes in us than human genes, by recent counts it’s something like 360 to 1. We also know that your stomach can change your cravings, but now we know that your stomach affects more than just your thoughts. Your stomach can control what can get to your brain.... Read more »

Viorica Braniste, Maha Al-Asmakh, Czeslawa Kowal, Farhana Anuar, Afrouz Abbaspour, Miklós Tóth, Agata Korecka, Nadja Bakocevic, Ng Lai Guan, Parag Kundu.... (2014) The gut microbiota influences blood-brain barrier permeability in mice. Science Translational Medicine. info:/10.1126/scitranslmed.3009759

  • November 18, 2014
  • 05:14 PM
  • 98 views

Does brain training really work?

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Ever wonder if you could be the next Einstein if only you could do some brain training? Well as it turns out, while computer based ‘brain training’ can boost memory and thinking skills in older adults, many programs promoted by the $1 billion brain training industry are ineffective.... Read more »

  • November 17, 2014
  • 03:33 PM
  • 81 views

The (Re)discovery of a major brain pathway

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

It was like something out of a mystery movie, a couple of years ago a scientist, looking at dozens of MRI scans of human brains noticed something surprising. A large, fiber pathway that seemed to be part of the network of connections that process visual information showed up on the scans, but the researcher couldn’t find it mentioned in any of the modern-day anatomy textbooks he had.... Read more »

Brian Wandell, Jason Yeatman, & Kevin Weiner. (2014) The vertical occipital fasciculus: A century of controversy resolved by in vivo measurements. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. info:/10.1073/pnas.1418503111

  • November 16, 2014
  • 08:05 PM
  • 77 views

Canine science catch up: 16-30 September 2014

by Cobb & Hecht in Do You Believe In Dog?

Gosh, it's been a busy ride since posting the excellent guest post by research, Cat Reeve, about her interesting detector dog research.  So now it's time to play catch up, starting with the canine science related things that we noticed in the second half of September, captured with the help of Storify - did you miss any of these?[View the story "Do You Believe in Dog? [16 - 30 September 2014]" on Storify]Further reading (some of the abstracts from Canine Science Forum 2014 now available):We........ Read more »

Westgarth Carri, & Hayley E. Christian. (2014) How can we motivate owners to walk their dogs more?. Journal of Veterinary Behavior: Clinical Applications and Research, 9(6). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jveb.2014.09.023  

Horowitz Alexandra, & Hecht Julie . (2014) Categories and consequences of dog-human play: A citizen science approach. Journal of Veterinary Behavior: Clinical Applications and Research, 9(6). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jveb.2014.09.052  

Browne Clare M., T. Mary Foster, & James S. McEwan. (2014) Dog training: Reinforcement timing and owner body language. Journal of Veterinary Behavior: Clinical Applications and Research, 9(6). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jveb.2014.09.059  

  • November 16, 2014
  • 01:47 PM
  • 91 views

Soldiers and Suicide: A familiar tale

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

As a Marine, there is a special place in my heart for all things military. While most protesters are busy arguing about the people who are dying overseas, there is an even more disheartening statistic — the suicide statistics of service members here at home. Suicide is an ugly word, so it’s no surprise that there is not a large movement fighting for better care and a new study done on soldiers doesn’t help.... Read more »

  • November 15, 2014
  • 12:09 PM
  • 98 views

Telomeres, Epigenetics, and Aging: the new found complexities in your genes

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Telomere length is associated with aging, this isn’t a new statement, but interestingly enough there is more to this story than just the size of your telomeres. Telomere lengths have now been shown to cause epigenetic changes, this new discovery may help explain the aging of cells and how they initiate and transmit disease.... Read more »

Jerome D. Robin,, Andrew T. Ludlow,, Kimberly Batten,, Frederique Magdinier,, Guido Stadler,, Kathyrin R. Wagner,, Jerry W. Shay,, & Woodring E. Wright. (2014) Telomere position effect: regulation of gene expression with progressive telomere shortening over long distances. Genes . info:/

  • November 14, 2014
  • 07:20 PM
  • 118 views

Evolutionary Sins: The Gender Gap In Spatial Cognition And Navigation

by Alexis Delanoir in How to Paint Your Panda

Recent research based on the Twe and Tjimba people of northwestern Namibia is suggested to lend evidence that gender gaps in spatial cognition are a result of evolutionary pressures, as men with higher spatial cognition are more successful in these tribes at mating and producing offspring. This post examines the literature and comes to a different conclusion, warning against hasty evolutionary explanations for behavioural traits.... Read more »

  • November 14, 2014
  • 02:39 PM
  • 90 views

Chlamydia and Cancer: A new connection

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Infections due to the sexually transmitted bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis often remain unnoticed. The pathogen is not only a common cause of female infertility; it is also suspected of increasing the risk of abdominal cancer. A new study has now observed the breakdown of an important endogenous protective factor in the course of chlamydial infection. In other words, the pathogen can cause an increased risk of certain cancers.... Read more »

González E, Rother M, Kerr MC, Al-Zeer MA, Abu-Lubad M, Kessler M, Brinkmann V, Loewer A, & Meyer TF. (2014) Chlamydia infection depends on a functional MDM2-p53 axis. Nature communications, 5201. PMID: 25392082  

  • November 13, 2014
  • 05:18 PM
  • 125 views

Limitless: The science behind remembering everything

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

If you could remember everything, you saw, learned, or did, would it be a blessing or a curse? Well an even better question would be, it even possible to upgrade the storage capabilities of the brain? The answer is strangely enough, maybe, according to a new study we might just be able to remember quite literally everything.
... Read more »

Denise Cook7, Erin Nuro7, Emma V. Jones, Haider F. Altimimi, W. Todd Farmer, Valentina Gandin,, Edith Hanna,, Ruiting Zong,, Alessandro Barbon,, David L. Nelson,, Ivan Topisirovic,, Joseph Rochford,, David Stellwagen,, Jean-Claude Béïque,, & Keith K. Murai. (2014) FXR1P Limits Long-Term Memory, Long-Lasting Synaptic Potentiation, and De Novo GluA2 Translation . Cell Reports. info:/10.1016/j.celrep.2014.10.028

  • November 13, 2014
  • 01:27 PM
  • 104 views

“How Today’s College Students Use Wikipedia”: Journal Club Report by Helena Hollis

by Helena Hollis in DIS Student Blog

Summary of the article by A.J. Head and M.B. Eisenberg and the discussion of it at the UCL MA LIS Journal Club, which meets monthly.... Read more »

  • November 12, 2014
  • 04:38 PM
  • 107 views

Ever wonder how the brain maps our world?

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Sometimes we go into automatic, that “new” coffee shop on your way to work you just noticed, well it has been there for weeks. We can gauge where we are from just about anywhere we have already been. Giving directions, well some of us can never do that, yet we can still get from point A to B easy enough. Yet if we were to drive or even walk backwards and the world wouldn’t feel quite right, things would feel and seem just a little weird — not just because we are used to seeing things pas........ Read more »

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