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Astronomy posts

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  • July 28, 2016
  • 12:48 PM
  • 69 views

Space disturbs the heart-related system and increases the chances of death

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Point:

Deep space missions could increase the chances of cardiovascular diseases, thereby increasing the chances of deaths in astronauts.

Published in:

Scientific Reports

Study Further:

NASA’s Apollo program sent 9 manned missions and 24 astronauts above the low Earth orbit (LEO) during decades of 1960s and 1970s. Those missions also included Apollo 11, which was used to take Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin to the moon. However, it appears that such beyond Earth missions........ Read more »

  • July 13, 2016
  • 07:28 AM
  • 183 views

An equation for life

by gdw in FictionalFieldwork

Water churns. Earth moves. Molecules jostle and chemicals mix. Between heaven and hell, a young planet finds itself in full flux. Developing. Forming. Star stuff rains down and forged elements bubble up. Then it happens. It seems as if it’s just another chemical match-up, another reaction in the vast library of possibilities. But it would […]... Read more »

Scharf C, & Cronin L. (2016) Quantifying the origins of life on a planetary scale. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. PMID: 27382156  

  • May 3, 2016
  • 07:39 AM
  • 316 views

Flipping the Drake Equation for a deep time perspective on the Fermi Paradox

by gdw in FictionalFieldwork

Is anybody out there? Where are all the alien civilizations? Even if (intelligent) life is very unlikely, the sheer size and age of the universe means that even long odds might have produced space faring civilizations. Yet, so far, nada. When people are considering the (im)probability of non-human space travellers, one thing always comes up: […]... Read more »

  • March 8, 2016
  • 06:47 AM
  • 444 views

How Einstein Could Still Save the Earth

by Jeffrey Daniels in United Academics

Gravitational waves, detected by LIGO, might have implications for finding black holes.... Read more »

  • February 29, 2016
  • 09:39 AM
  • 388 views

End of Universe – estimated earliest time

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Point:

Universe would end earlier than the anticipated time for the Sun to burn completely.

Published in:

arXiv

Study Further:

Scientific observation of the stars and galaxies in our universe are showing that the universe is continuously expanding, and the rate of this expansion is continuously increasing. After looking at this continuous expansion, one of the suggested possibilities for the future is that, the stars would die, everything in the universe will drift out, and t........ Read more »

Jose Beltran Jimenez, Ruth Lazkoz, Diego Saez-Gomez, & Vincenzo Salzano. (2016) Observational support for approaching cosmic doomsday. arXiv. arXiv: 1602.06211v1

  • February 17, 2016
  • 01:39 AM
  • 411 views

New model says that the Universe has no start and it existed forever

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Points:

According to a new model, Big Bang never happened and Universe existed forever without any beginning.

Published in:

Physics Letters B

Study Further:

According to our present knowledge, Universe came into existence about 13.8 billion years ago. Before the existence of Universe, everything was in the form of a tiny point, which is also referred to as singularity. Therefore, it is assumed that everything in the Universe was present in that tiny point at that time. Then a........ Read more »

Farag Ali, A., & Das, S. (2015) Cosmology from quantum potential. Physics Letters B, 276-279. DOI: 10.1016/j.physletb.2014.12.057  

  • February 13, 2016
  • 05:02 AM
  • 524 views

Now we can hear the Universe

by TakFurTheKaffe in Tak Fur The Kaffe

The detection of gravitational waves produced by the collision of two black holes over 1 billion light years away confirms Einstein's vision of our Universe.... Read more »

Abbott, B., Abbott, R., Abbott, T., Abernathy, M., Acernese, F., Ackley, K., Adams, C., Adams, T., Addesso, P., Adhikari, R.... (2016) Observation of Gravitational Waves from a Binary Black Hole Merger. Physical Review Letters, 116(6). DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.061102  

  • February 2, 2016
  • 02:13 AM
  • 561 views

Earth = combination of two planets (study shows)

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Point:

Earth is actually a combination of two planets, i.e. Earth and Theia, a planet thought to be about the size of Mars.

Published in:

Science

Study Further:

Researchers from University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) have recently reported that there was a “violent, head-on collision” of Earth and Theia, which is thought to be an ancient planet having the approximate size of Mars or according to some it was about Earth’s size, about 4.5 billion years ag........ Read more »

Young, E., Kohl, I., Warren, P., Rubie, D., Jacobson, S., & Morbidelli, A. (2016) Oxygen isotopic evidence for vigorous mixing during the Moon-forming giant impact. Science, 351(6272), 493-496. DOI: 10.1126/science.aad0525  

  • January 21, 2016
  • 02:00 AM
  • 406 views

New reports for a giant planet in the Solar System

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Point:

Our Solar System has ninth planet in the outer spaces as evidenced by researchers.

Published in:

The Astronomical Journal

Study Further:

Researchers have recently reported that they have found the best known evidence for the existence of ninth planet, referred to as Planet X or Planet Nine, at the outer limits of our Solar System. However, it has been noted that there are no direct evidences for the presence of ninth planet. Researchers have based their argument about ........ Read more »

  • January 16, 2016
  • 03:12 PM
  • 628 views

‘Space Warps’ and other citizen science projects reap major dividends for astrophysics

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Thanks to the Internet, amateur volunteers known as "citizen scientists" can readily donate their time and effort to science--in fields ranging from medicine to zoology to astrophysics. The astrophysics project Space Warps offers a compelling example of why citizen science has become such a popular tool and how valuable it can be.

... Read more »

Marshall, P., Verma, A., More, A., Davis, C., More, S., Kapadia, A., Parrish, M., Snyder, C., Wilcox, J., Baeten, E.... (2015) SPACE WARPS - I. Crowdsourcing the discovery of gravitational lenses. Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 455(2), 1171-1190. DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stv2009  

More, A., Verma, A., Marshall, P., More, S., Baeten, E., Wilcox, J., Macmillan, C., Cornen, C., Kapadia, A., Parrish, M.... (2015) SPACE WARPS- II. New gravitational lens candidates from the CFHTLS discovered through citizen science. Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 455(2), 1191-1210. DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stv1965  

  • January 13, 2016
  • 03:44 PM
  • 586 views

Beam me up! Teleporting the memory of an organism

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

In "Star Trek", a transporter can teleport a person from one location to a remote location without actually making the journey along the way. Such a transporter has fascinated many people. Quantum teleportation shares several features of the transporter and is one of the most important protocols in quantum information.... Read more »

  • December 24, 2015
  • 03:54 PM
  • 709 views

It came from planet X: ‘Forbidden’ substances on super-Earths

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Using mathematical models, scientists have ‘looked’ into the interior of super-Earths and discovered that they may contain compounds that are forbidden by the classical rules of chemistry — these substances may increase the heat transfer rate and strengthen the magnetic field on these planets.... Read more »

  • December 22, 2015
  • 02:06 AM
  • 475 views

Watching the Sun

by teofilo in Gambler's House

Today is the winter solstice, and the seventh anniversary of this blog. I’ve traditionally posted about archaeoastronomy on these anniversaries, so I’m going to briefly interrupt my series on Crucible of Pueblos to discuss an interesting article on the evidence for astronomical observations at Chaco Canyon. There turns out to be some overlap, actually, which […]... Read more »

Munro AM, & Malville JM. (2010) Calendrical Stations in Chaco Canyon. Archaeoastronomy, 91-106. info:/

  • December 14, 2015
  • 06:24 AM
  • 540 views

Black Holes Can Over-Eat, Too.

by Jeffrey Daniels in United Academics

Once upon a time, it was thought that black holes could ‘eat-up’ accreted matter. That is: gas, dust, and other such things that have been pulled into the black hole’s gravity field, usually forming a disk of rotating material. The black holes would pull the matter into infinity, with no limit to how large a black hole could become in this manner.... Read more »

Andrew King. (2015) How Big Can a Black Hole Grow?. MNRAS Letters. arXiv: 1511.08502v2

  • December 9, 2015
  • 03:38 PM
  • 644 views

Computing with time travel

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Why send a message back in time, but lock it so that no one can ever read the contents? Because it may be the key to solving currently intractable problems. It turns out that an unopened message can be exceedingly useful. This is true if the experimenter entangles the message with some other system in the laboratory before sending it.... Read more »

Yuan, X., Assad, S., Thompson, J., Haw, J., Vedral, V., Ralph, T., Lam, P., Weedbrook, C., & Gu, M. (2015) Replicating the benefits of Deutschian closed timelike curves without breaking causality. npj Quantum Information, 15007. DOI: 10.1038/npjqi.2015.7  

  • December 2, 2015
  • 08:18 PM
  • 764 views

Our pale blue dot in the wake of destruction

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

This is our home, that pale blue dot, dwarfed by an arrow that takes up less space on your screen than this sentence. For all our might and “overwhelming” intelligence, if we flexed our mental might and developed a weapon to destroy this pale blue dot, it would almost certainly go unnoticed in the universe.... Read more »

  • October 20, 2015
  • 02:30 PM
  • 636 views

You too can learn to farm on Mars!

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Scientists at Washington State University and the University of Idaho are helping students figure out how to farm on Mars, much like astronaut Mark Watney, played by Matt Damon, attempts in the critically acclaimed movie “The Martian.” Washington State University physicist Michael Allen and University of Idaho food scientist Helen Joyner teamed up to explore the […]... Read more »

Helen S. Joyner et al. (2015) Farming In Space? Developing a Sustainable Food Supply on Mars. National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science. info:other/Link

  • September 17, 2015
  • 09:00 AM
  • 1,147 views

The Martian: Getting Home Is Just Half The Problem

by Mark Lasbury in The 'Scope

"The Martian" movie opens soon! It's about an astronaut stranded on Mars who is trying to survive and find a way to get back home. But today, we humans here on Earth still have to think of clever ways to survive a trip to the red planet in the first place.... Read more »

  • August 6, 2015
  • 01:22 AM
  • 709 views

Best evidence yet for active volcanism on Venus?

by Paul Wren in Venus Dispatches

OverviewIn an article from Geophysical Research Letters, a team led by Eugene Shaygin used images taken by the Venus Monitoring Camera (VMC) aboard Venus Express to identify transient hot spots on the surface. These hot spots are located near very young (~10 Mya) volcanoes and rifts, and are suggestive of active lava flows.Even though the surface is generally obscured from view by the thick clouds, there is a transparent window through which light can pass in the near infrared wavelengths, and t........ Read more »

Shalygin, E., Markiewicz, W., Basilevsky, A., Titov, D., Ignatiev, N., & Head, J. (2015) Active volcanism on Venus in the Ganiki Chasma rift zone. Geophysical Research Letters, 42(12), 4762-4769. DOI: 10.1002/2015GL064088  

  • August 5, 2015
  • 12:51 AM
  • 642 views

Quick Look: Vertical profiles of H2O, H2SO4, and sulfuric acid concentration at 45–75 km on Venus

by Paul Wren in Venus Dispatches

An improved model for vertical profiles of water and sulfuric acid vapors as well as sulfuric acid concentrations in the Venus clouds is presented. From the April 2015 edition of Icarus:Title:Vertical profiles of H2O, H2SO4, and sulfuric acid concentration at 45–75 km on VenusAbstract:A method developed by Krasnopolsky and Pollack (Krasnopolsky, V.A., Pollack, J.B. [1994]. Icarus 109, 58–78) to model vertical profiles of H2O and H2SO4 vapors and sulfuric acid concentration in the Venus cloud........ Read more »

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