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  • October 20, 2014
  • 11:59 AM
  • 66 views

Does Literary Fiction Challenge Racial Stereotypes?

by Jalees Rehman in Fragments of Truth

Reading literary fiction can be highly pleasurable, but does it also make you a better person? Conventional wisdom and intuition lead us to believe that reading can indeed improve us. However, as the philosopher Emrys Westacott has recently pointed out in his essay for 3Quarksdaily, we may overestimate the capacity of literary fiction to foster moral improvement. A slew of scientific studies have taken on the task of studying the impact of literary fiction on our emotions and thoughts. Some of t........ Read more »

Johnson, D., Huffman, B., & Jasper, D. (2014) Changing Race Boundary Perception by Reading Narrative Fiction. Basic and Applied Social Psychology, 36(1), 83-90. DOI: 10.1080/01973533.2013.856791  

  • October 18, 2014
  • 09:34 AM
  • 73 views

Merit’s Liquidity

by nooffensebut in The Unsilenced Science

The latest SAT and ACT data suggest that America’s cognitive elite have been enjoying new geographic mobility, but difficult economic times push them out of the elite strata, contrary to a prediction of The Bell Curve by Richard Herrnstein and Charles Murray.... Read more »

nooffensebut. (2014) Parents’ Income is a Poor Predictor of SAT Score. Open Differential Psychology, 1-19. info:other/

  • October 17, 2014
  • 04:02 PM
  • 61 views

A look at Air Pollution and Your Body

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

We have all probably seen stories from China on the horrid air pollution there. Accompanying those reports of course are the statistics for air pollution that deaths have caused. For the record, the World Health Organization estimated that ambient air pollution caused 3.7 million premature deaths (worldwide) in 2012 alone – yet what exactly happens to your body when it encounters pollutants?... Read more »

  • October 17, 2014
  • 06:13 AM
  • 95 views

Large Sized Men Disadvantaged In Relationships

by Rangina Barakzai in United Academics

For decades men have been diffident and self-doubting about the size of their phallus. Well, luckily for the holders of the pocket rocket, there is a twist.... Read more »

  • October 15, 2014
  • 02:22 PM
  • 105 views

You can tell [my mood] by the way I walk

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Ever see a guy walking down the street and know he’s depressed? Or how about someone happy, with a little bounce in their step? The way we walk says a lot and by some estimates roughly 90% of what we are telling people isn’t coming out our mouth, it’s all body language. Our walk says a lot about the kind of mood we are in, but in the question of what came first our mood or our walk, researchers have now shown that it works both ways.... Read more »

  • October 15, 2014
  • 04:38 AM
  • 76 views

How You Feel About People is Related to How You Feel About Cities

by Mark Rubin in Mark Rubin's Social Psychology Research Blog

There are numerous structural factors that influence people’s attitudes towards cities. However, these factors may be constituents of broader sociocultural “questions” that people ask about their cities.  For example, residents’ concern about the transport and entertainment venues of a city might form part of a broader social psychological concern about the potential for the city to accommodate their need to meet friends and socialize with others. Alternatively, people might focus on a ........ Read more »

  • October 14, 2014
  • 10:22 AM
  • 46 views

Treating school uniforms to reduce dengue: the Finances

by Yao-Hua Law in TORCH

 [A shorter version of this article first appeared on SciDev.Net] Scientists working to reduce dengue among school children in Thailand are testing something new: insecticide-treated school uniforms. A recent model published in PLoS One suggests that this intervention can be economically attractive in the context of Thailand. Using data from dengue studies in Thailand, the […]... Read more »

  • October 14, 2014
  • 09:34 AM
  • 80 views

What do we share with other primates in terms of cognition?

by Henkjan Honing in Music Matters

Below a beautiful summary of the recent literature on the neurobiology of action imitation/understanding, language, and rhythmic processing/auditory timing (Mendoza & Merchant, in press). The neural circuitry that is thought to be involved in all three higher cognitive functions is shown here for three closely related primates: the macaque monkey, chimpanzee and human brain.... Read more »

Merchant, H., & Honing, H. (2013) Are non-human primates capable of rhythmic entrainment? Evidence for the gradual audiomotor evolution hypothesis. Frontiers in Neuroscience, 7(274). info:/

  • October 13, 2014
  • 07:01 PM
  • 44 views

What do clinicians make of addiction recovery?

by DJMac in Recovery Review

Which teachers were the best when you were at school? Likely the ones who believed in you, connected with you, who had a vision for where you could go and who enthusiastically helped you get there. The same characteristics are likely to define the best clinicians too. In a study, published a few days ago, [...]
The post What do clinicians make of addiction recovery? appeared first on Recovery Review.
... Read more »

  • October 13, 2014
  • 05:17 PM
  • 76 views

Emodiversity: A Mix of Emotions Is Healthiest?

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

“Emodiversity” – a life containing a balance of different emotions – is good for you. So say psychologists Jordi Quoidbach and colleagues in a rather cool new paper (pdf). In two large surveys (with a total of over 37,000 responders), conducted in France and Belgium, Quoidbach et al. show that emodiversity is an independent predictor […]The post Emodiversity: A Mix of Emotions Is Healthiest? appeared first on Neuroskeptic.... Read more »

Quoidbach J, Gruber J, Mikolajczak M, Kogan A, Kotsou I, & Norton MI. (2014) Emodiversity and the Emotional Ecosystem. Journal of experimental psychology. General. PMID: 25285428  

  • October 13, 2014
  • 07:59 AM
  • 105 views

The Psychology of Procrastination: How We Create Categories of the Future

by Jalees Rehman in The Next Regeneration

A fully rational approach to task completion would involve creating a priority list of tasks based on a composite score of task importance and the remaining time until the deadline. The most important task with the most proximate deadline would have to be tackled first, and the lowest priority task with the furthest deadline last. This sounds great in theory, but it is quite difficult to implement. A substantial amount of research has been conducted to understand how our moods, distractability a........ Read more »

  • October 12, 2014
  • 05:37 PM
  • 74 views

Language users or learners? Lexical evidence from spoken ELF

by Ray Carey in ELFA project

One of the key distinctions made in research on English as a lingua franca (ELF) is the difference between language users and learners. ELF data is typically approached from the viewpoint of second language use instead of second language acquisition. Rather than seeing non-native English speakers as perennially deficient pursuers of “native-like” proficiency, ELF researchers […]... Read more »

  • October 12, 2014
  • 02:11 PM
  • 104 views

What Really Drives Academic Citations?

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

Citations are today the international currency of the scholarly economy. In theory, academic citations are the gold standard measure of the ‘impact‘ of a piece of work. If it gets other academics talking then it’s important. But why do individual academics cite particular articles? A paper out now in the Social Studies of Science journal […]The post What Really Drives Academic Citations? appeared first on Neuroskeptic.... Read more »

Erikson MG, & Erlandson P. (2014) A taxonomy of motives to cite. Social studies of science, 44(4), 625-37. PMID: 25272615  

  • October 10, 2014
  • 07:55 AM
  • 111 views

The Friday Five for 10/10/14

by Bill Sullivan in The 'Scope

Paralyzed rats walk again, origins of AIDS, science of touching and kissing, and how to tell if you're dying.... Read more »

Wenger N, Moraud EM, Raspopovic S, Bonizzato M, DiGiovanna J, Musienko P, Morari M, Micera S, & Courtine G. (2014) Closed-loop neuromodulation of spinal sensorimotor circuits controls refined locomotion after complete spinal cord injury. Science translational medicine, 6(255). PMID: 25253676  

Pinto, J., Wroblewski, K., Kern, D., Schumm, L., & McClintock, M. (2014) Olfactory Dysfunction Predicts 5-Year Mortality in Older Adults. PLoS ONE, 9(10). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0107541  

Faria, N., Rambaut, A., Suchard, M., Baele, G., Bedford, T., Ward, M., Tatem, A., Sousa, J., Arinaminpathy, N., Pepin, J.... (2014) The early spread and epidemic ignition of HIV-1 in human populations. Science, 346(6205), 56-61. DOI: 10.1126/science.1256739  

  • October 9, 2014
  • 11:07 PM
  • 106 views

Gaining a Green Thumb for Grassroots Language Activism

by Alexandra Grey in Language on the Move

I was surprised, frankly, during my recent fieldwork to find Zhuang language being used in a QQ chatroom in China. Surprised because Zhuang text is absent from the linguistic landscape. Surprised because many of my interview participants reported they had … Continue reading →... Read more »

Cru, Josep. (2014) Language Revitalisation from the Ground Up: Promoting Yucatec Maya on Facebook. Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, 1-13. info:/10.1080/01434632.2014.921184

  • October 9, 2014
  • 09:50 PM
  • 120 views

Fluoridation, or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Water

by Alexis Delanoir in How to Paint Your Panda

Most of us have heard the famous line by General Jack D. Ripper in Dr. Strangelove, "have you ever seen a Commie drink a glass of water?" The conversation thereafter satirically illustrated a fear that grew most prominent starting in the 1940s with the Second Red Scare -- public water fluoridation. Many conspiracy theories about water fluoridation arose during this time, but they all aimed to make the same case: that fluoride in drinking water is bad (sometimes just meaning unethical),........ Read more »

  • October 6, 2014
  • 03:55 PM
  • 106 views

Orange Corn Aims to Fight Vitamin A Deficiency

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

GMO food is still a hot button topic, honestly for no other reason than fear. Sure Monsanto is a big evil corporation, but the science is only as bad as what you do with it. In the modern fortified world we don’t think about vitamin deficiency or the horrible things that come with it, however vitamin A deficiency is a huge problem in developing countries. To combat this researchers have identified a set of genes that can be used to naturally boost the provitamin A content of corn kernels, a fi........ Read more »

  • October 6, 2014
  • 02:29 PM
  • 105 views

The Biology of Nagging

by Miss Behavior in The Scorpion and the Frog

A female pied flycatcher can't feed herself sufficientlywhile she incubates her eggs and newly-hatchedchicks. Photo by Alejandro Cantarero.I have been blessed with the fortune of not just having two healthy and happy babies, but being able to spend much of the spring and summer nurturing them and watching them develop and grow. But it has not been all roses: their smiles beam through the fog of my sleep deprivation and exhaustion. Their tears are met with my own. Our clothes are stained in a ra........ Read more »

  • October 5, 2014
  • 11:45 PM
  • 90 views

Models and metaphors we live by

by Artem Kaznatcheev in Evolutionary Games Group

George Lakoff and Mark Johnson’s Metaphors we live by is a classic, that has had a huge influence on parts of linguistics and cognitive science, and some influence — although less so, in my opinion — on philosophy. It is structured around the thought that “[m]etaphor is one of our most important tools for trying […]... Read more »

Narayanan, S. (1997) Embodiment in language understanding: Sensory-motor representations for metaphoric reasoning about event descriptions. PhD Thesis (University of California, Berkeley). info:/

  • October 5, 2014
  • 05:09 PM
  • 92 views

The Playing Ground Part Two

by Rodney Steadman in Gravity's Pull

Does the removal of park benches from a playground increase physical activity in adults and children?... Read more »

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