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  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,955 views

in indirect support of the hygiene hypothesis

by Ragamuffin in How We Are Hungry

A recent study out of the University of Michigan Medical School suggests that the stomach bacterium Helicobacter pylori protects against inflammation caused by Salmonella in a mouse model of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD).... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,789 views

Rethinking Circadian Clock Machinery

by Allison in Dormivigilia

Chronobiologists at Cambridge have discovered circadian rhythms in peroxide oxidation in HUMAN blood cells. That sounds cool, right? But what if I told you that this research will forever make us rethink the innerworkings of the circadian clock because this is the first documentation of non-transcriptionally driven circadian rhythms... Read more »

O'Neill JS, & Reddy AB. (2011) Circadian clocks in human red blood cells. Nature, 469(7331), 498-503. PMID: 21270888  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,089 views

Pharyngeal pressures and the masako maneuver

by Adam in slowdog

Explores how pharyngeal pressures are effected by tongue-hold swallow. ... Read more »

Doeltgen SH, Macrae P, & Huckabee ML. (2011) Pharyngeal pressure generation during tongue-hold swallows across age groups. American journal of speech-language pathology / American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 20(2), 124-30. PMID: 21386045  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,410 views

Only Science Can Save Us, but Science Alone Can’t Save Us

by Paul Statt in Paul Statt Communications

Chris Mooney, writing about the recently un-raptured believers, climate change skeptics, and Moms who refuse to vaccinate, in Mother Jones (“Rapture Ready: The Science of Self Delusion,” May/June 2011) comes to the melancholy conclusion that science has proven that science seldom changes anyone’s mind.... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,547 views

Copyright vs Medicine: If this topic isn’t covered in your newspaper this weekend, get a new newspaper

by Neurobonkers in Neurobonkers

After thirty years of silence, authors of a standard clinical psychiatric bedside test have issued take down orders of new medical research. Doctors who use copies of the bedside test which will have been printed in some of their oldest medical textbooks are liable to be sued for up to $150,000.... Read more »

Newman, J., & Feldman, R. (2011) Copyright and Open Access at the Bedside. New England Journal of Medicine, 365(26), 2447-2449. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMp1110652  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,631 views

Is this journal for real?

by Neurobonkers in Neurobonkers

This year 134 suspect new journals have appeared from the abyss, all published by the same clandestine company “Scientific & Academic Publishing, USA“... Read more »

Morrison, Heather. (2012) Scholarly Communication in Crisis. Freedom for scholarship in the internet age. Simon Fraser University School of Communication. info:/

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,190 views

Synthesising Pseudoephedrine From N-Methylamphetamine

by Neurobonkers in Neurobonkers

The paper describes how “in the past most stores were able to sell pseudoephedrine”, the US’s most popular decongestant but new laws require pharmacies, often with restricted opening hours to sell the medicine only to those carrying government issued ID. The paper argues that “it would be of great interest to have a simple synthesis of pseudoephedrine from reagents which can be more readily procured”. The study is published in the splendidly titled Journal of Apocry........ Read more »

Hai, O. Hakkenshit, I.B. (2012) A Simple and Convenient Synthesis of Pseudoephedrine From N-Methylamphetamine. Journal of Apocryphal Chemistry, 213-21. info:/1F.1BC9/b00000F00A

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,357 views

Dizziness When Standing Up Linked to Greater Risk of Heart Failure: Research

by United Academics in United Academics

Many people feel suddenly dizzy when they stand up too quickly. This is caused by orthostatic hypotension, a rapid drop in blood pressure. Now a team of scientists at the University of North Carolina suggest that people with orthostatic hypotension might have a greater risk of developing heart failure.... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,027 views

“Beware of Exercise” is a Sexy Headline

by nooffensebut in The Unsilenced Science

A new study that raised concerns about exercise should instead raise concerns about obesity.... Read more »

Claude Bouchard, Steven Blair, Timothy Church, Conrad Earnest, James Hagberg, Keijo Häkkinen, Nathan Jenkins, Laura Karavirta, William Kraus, Arthur Leon.... (2012) Adverse Metabolic Response to Regular Exercise: Is It a Rare or Common Occurrence?. PLOS One, 7(5). info:/10.1371/journal.pone.0037887

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,015 views

Working Late in Pregnancy May Be as Bad for the Baby as Smoking: Research

by United Academics in United Academics

Researchers at the University of Essex, in the UK, have found that babies born to women who kept working during their eighth month of pregnancy tend to weight 230g less than those born to mothers who stopped working. The harm was bigger when the women had lower levels of education, while there was no harm at all when they were younger than 24.... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,237 views

Genes Dealt Made Asians Svelte

by nooffensebut in The Unsilenced Science

Early genome-wide association studies suggest a genetic propensity to thinness in Asians. I review how these kinds of studies might be able reveal genetic racial differences in obesity and intelligence, and I address a few of the challenges to doing so.... Read more »

Belsky DW, Moffitt TE, Houts R, Bennett GG, Biddle AK, Blumenthal JA, Evans JP, Harrington H, Sugden K, Williams B.... (2012) Polygenic risk, rapid childhood growth, and the development of obesity: evidence from a 4-decade longitudinal study. Archives of pediatrics , 166(6), 515-21. PMID: 22665028  

Hsu FC, Lenchik L, Nicklas BJ, Lohman K, Register TC, Mychaleckyj J, Langefeld CD, Freedman BI, Bowden DW, & Carr JJ. (2005) Heritability of body composition measured by DXA in the diabetes heart study. Obesity research, 13(2), 312-9. PMID: 15800289  

Kilpeläinen TO, Zillikens MC, Stančákova A, Finucane FM, Ried JS, Langenberg C, Zhang W, Beckmann JS, Luan J, Vandenput L.... (2011) Genetic variation near IRS1 associates with reduced adiposity and an impaired metabolic profile. Nature genetics, 43(8), 753-60. PMID: 21706003  

Lohmueller KE, Indap AR, Schmidt S, Boyko AR, Hernandez RD, Hubisz MJ, Sninsky JJ, White TJ, Sunyaev SR, Nielsen R.... (2008) Proportionally more deleterious genetic variation in European than in African populations. Nature, 451(7181), 994-7. PMID: 18288194  

MacArthur DG, Balasubramanian S, Frankish A, Huang N, Morris J, Walter K, Jostins L, Habegger L, Pickrell JK, Montgomery SB.... (2012) A systematic survey of loss-of-function variants in human protein-coding genes. Science (New York, N.Y.), 335(6070), 823-8. PMID: 22344438  

Speliotes EK, Willer CJ, Berndt SI, Monda KL, Thorleifsson G, Jackson AU, Lango Allen H, Lindgren CM, Luan J, Mägi R.... (2010) Association analyses of 249,796 individuals reveal 18 new loci associated with body mass index. Nature genetics, 42(11), 937-48. PMID: 20935630  

Tennessen JA, Bigham AW, O'Connor TD, Fu W, Kenny EE, Gravel S, McGee S, Do R, Liu X, Jun G.... (2012) Evolution and functional impact of rare coding variation from deep sequencing of human exomes. Science (New York, N.Y.), 337(6090), 64-9. PMID: 22604720  

Zuk O, Hechter E, Sunyaev SR, & Lander ES. (2012) The mystery of missing heritability: Genetic interactions create phantom heritability. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 109(4), 1193-8. PMID: 22223662  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,903 views

Fructose: friend or foe? Preliminary findings.

by Kismet in Biogerontology and Health

This discussion has been going on for quite some time and it is certainly not limited to the lay press and lay population. I have always been interested in double checking pop-sci claims, in this case the "evil fructose" meme.... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,458 views

Testing Hair Can Detect Heart Disease

by Andrew Porterfield in United Academics

Usually, doctors take a blood test to determine levels of cortisol, a hormone that’s elevated by stress and is linked to a number of cardiovascular disorders. But a blood test just takes a cross-section “snapshot” of blood cortisol levels, and can’t tell how long these levels have been high.... Read more »

Manenschijn, L., Schaap, L., van Schoor, N., van der Pas, S., Peeters, G., Lips, P., Koper, J., & van Rossum, E. (2013) High Long-Term Cortisol Levels, Measured in Scalp Hair, Are Associated With a History of Cardiovascular Disease. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology , 98(5), 2078-2083. DOI: 10.1210/jc.2012-3663  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,213 views

I WILL FEAR NO EVIL: THE FIRST HEAD TRANSPLANT ON HUMAN

by Eugenio Maria Battaglia in Science to Grok

In 2008, doctor Sergio Canavero, an italian neurosurgeon based in Turin, IT, have awakened a 20 years old lady from a permanent post-traumatic vegetative state, by means of a bifocal extradural cortical electro-stimulation. Today, while Science still find it hard to explain consciousness and embodied cognition – the world-class neurosurgeon made a shock announcement: “I’m ready for the first head transplant on a man.”

In the manuscript published on Surgical Neurology I........ Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,188 views

Interlukin 32 biomarker which predict relapse of mycobacterium tuberculosis

by B V Waghmare in HIV virus and antiretroviral drugs and antiAIDS vaccine research and developmets

Interlukin 32 a protien which is found in people which do test positie for mycobacterium tuberculosis infection but do not develop pulmonary disease, it is found that interlukin is important in killing micobacterium, thereby protect them from TB disease, this interleukin 32 can be used therapeutically in patients suffering with TB along with chemotherapy, which will enhance efficacy of anti tuberculosis chemo therapy... Read more »

B V Waghmare. (2014) Interlukin 32 biomarker that will predict relapse of tuberculosis infection and will be used in treatment of TB. http://www.medicalwebsite.org/2014/09/protein-that-protect-from-tb-infection.html. info:/

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,193 views

2014: The Year in Science

by Viputheshwar Sitaraman in Draw Science

The year in review: innovative discoveries and progress in all different fields of science. [Infographic]... Read more »

Qiu, X., Wong, G., Audet, J., Bello, A., Fernando, L., Alimonti, J., Fausther-Bovendo, H., Wei, H., Aviles, J., Hiatt, E.... (2014) Reversion of advanced Ebola virus disease in nonhuman primates with ZMapp. Nature, 514(7520), 47-53. DOI: 10.1038/nature13777  

Obokata, H., Wakayama, T., Sasai, Y., Kojima, K., Vacanti, M., Niwa, H., Yamato, M., & Vacanti, C. (2014) Stimulus-triggered fate conversion of somatic cells into pluripotency. Nature, 505(7485), 641-647. DOI: 10.1038/nature12968  

Quintana, E., Barclay, T., Raymond, S., Rowe, J., Bolmont, E., Caldwell, D., Howell, S., Kane, S., Huber, D., Crepp, J.... (2014) An Earth-Sized Planet in the Habitable Zone of a Cool Star. Science, 344(6181), 277-280. DOI: 10.1126/science.1249403  

A.K. Geim, & K. S. Novoselov. (2010) The rise and rise of graphene. Nature Nanotechnology, 5(11), 755-755. DOI: 10.1038/nnano.2010.224  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 777 views

Is Your Tech Working for You? Accuracy of Activity Trackers

by Rodney Steadman in Gravity's Pull

A look at two studies that investigate the effectiveness of activity trackers.... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 816 views

Is Your Tech Working for You? Accuracy of Activity Trackers

by Rodney Steadman in Gravity's Pull

Two studies that investigate the effectiveness of activity trackers.... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 702 views

The Fatal Flaw in Trial of Continuous or Interrupted Chest Compressions during CPR

by Rogue Medic in Rogue Medic

This is not a study that has a valid control group to determine if there is any benefit from ventilation. There is no group that does not receive ventilations, so it is like a study of one type of blood-letting vs. another type of blood-letting with the researchers taking for granted that blood-letting does improve outcomes. That is not a problem if blood-letting actually improves outcomes.

Should we take it for granted that blood-letting improves outcomes and that the only hypothesis worth s........ Read more »

Nichol, G., Leroux, B., Wang, H., Callaway, C., Sopko, G., Weisfeldt, M., Stiell, I., Morrison, L., Aufderheide, T., Cheskes, S.... (2015) Trial of Continuous or Interrupted Chest Compressions during CPR. New England Journal of Medicine, 2147483647. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1509139  

Alldredge BK,, Gelb AM,, Isaacs SM,, Corry MD,, Allen F,, Ulrich S,, Gottwald MD,, O’Neil N,, Neuhaus JM,, Segal MR,.... (2001) A Comparison of Lorazepam, Diazepam, and Placebo for the Treatment of Out-of-Hospital Status Epilepticus. New England Journal of Medicine, 345(25), 1860-1860. DOI: 10.1056/NEJM200112203452521  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 924 views

PD-L1 expression associates with non-inactivated VHL ccRCC

by Joana Guedes in BHD Research Blog

The loss of the of the tumor suppressor gene VHL and the subsequent deregulation of VHL/HIF/VEGF signalling are known to play a role in development of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). Renal tumours associated with BHD syndrome are histologically diverse and include a percentage of ccRCC (Pavlovich et al., 2002). Anti-angiogenic therapies targeting the VHL/HIF/VEGF pathway have emerged in past years (Rini et al., 2006) but the development of resistance to these therapeutic agents is leadi........ Read more »

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