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  • August 27, 2015
  • 12:00 PM
  • 60 views

The brain’s ebb and flow cares not for distance

by Pierre Megevand in Neuroscience and Medicine

Over the past decade, functional neuroimaging has revealed that our brains go through ever-changing patterns of activity, whether we are active or at rest, healthy or sick, under legal medication or high on illegal drugs. Yet this dynamic activity takes place over the comparatively fixed anatomical grid of neuronal connections; the functional weights of those connections therefore must be changing over time. Bratislav Misic, Marc G. Berman and their colleagues, from the Rotman Research Institute........ Read more »

Mišić, B., Fatima, Z., Askren, M., Buschkuehl, M., Churchill, N., Cimprich, B., Deldin, P., Jaeggi, S., Jung, M., Korostil, M.... (2014) The Functional Connectivity Landscape of the Human Brain. PLoS ONE, 9(10). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0111007  

  • August 27, 2015
  • 11:37 AM
  • 64 views

The Man Who Saw His Double In The Mirror

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

A creepy case report in the journal Neurocase describes a man who came to believe that his reflection was another person who lived behind the mirror.





The patient, Mr. B., a 78-year-old French man, was admitted to the neurology department in Tours:
During the previous 10 days, Mr. B. reported the presence of a stranger in his home who was located behind the mirror of the bathroom and strikingly shared his physical appearance. The stranger was a double of himself: he was the same size,... Read more »

  • August 26, 2015
  • 05:54 PM
  • 60 views

Non-Visual Processing in the Visual Cortex

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

Are there areas of the cerebral cortex purely devoted to vision? Or can the "visual" cortex, under some conditions, respond to sounds? Two papers published recently address this question.



First off, Micah Murray and colleagues of Switzerland discuss The multisensory function of primary visual cortex in humans in a review paper published in Neuropsychologia.

They criticize the conventional view that the primary visual cortex (in the occipital lobe) is little more than a reception point ... Read more »

Bedny M, Richardson H, & Saxe R. (2015) "Visual" Cortex Responds to Spoken Language in Blind Children. The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience, 35(33), 11674-81. PMID: 26290244  

Murray MM, Thelen A, Thut G, Romei V, Martuzzi R, & Matusz PJ. (2015) The multisensory function of primary visual cortex in humans. Neuropsychologia. PMID: 26275965  

  • August 26, 2015
  • 09:15 AM
  • 28 views

Many Patients with Clinical Alzheimer’s Do Not Have Significant Amyloid Pathology

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Eric Reiman MD Executive Director, Banner Alzheimer’s Institute (BAI) Chief Executive Officer, Banner Research Clinical Director of the Neurogenomics Division at the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) Professor of Psychiatry, University of Arizona Director, Arizona Alzheimer’s … Continue reading →
The post Many Patients with Clinical Alzheimer’s Do Not Have Significant Amyloid Pathology appeared first on MedicalResearch.com ........ Read more »

Dr. Eric Reiman MD. (2015) Many Patients with Clinical Alzheimer’s Do Not Have Significant Amyloid Pathology. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • August 25, 2015
  • 03:13 PM
  • 75 views

Microbes and the mind: Who's pulling the strings?

by neurosci in Neuroscientifically Challenged

There are many examples throughout nature of microorganisms like bacteria, viruses, and parasites influencing the neurobiology and behavior of their hosts. For example, the rabies virus enters the nervous system almost immediately after a bite or scratch and travels to the brain, where it influences neural activity to make aggressive behavior more likely. This, of course, is beneficial for the virus as it increases the probability its infected host will make contact with another susceptible host........ Read more »

  • August 24, 2015
  • 01:15 PM
  • 67 views

Genetic overlaps in autoimmune diseases may suggest common therapies

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Scientists who analyzed the genes involved in 10 autoimmune diseases that begin in childhood have discovered 22 genome-wide signals shared by two or more diseases. These shared gene sites may reveal potential new targets for treating many of these diseases, in some cases with existing drugs already available for non-autoimmune disorders.... Read more »

Yun R Li,, Jin Li,, Sihai D Zhao,, Jonathan P Bradfield,, Frank D Mentch,, S Melkorka Maggadottir,, Cuiping Hou,, Debra J Abrams,, Diana Chang,, Feng Gao,.... (2015) Meta-analysis of shared genetic architecture across ten pediatric autoimmune diseases. Nature Medicine. DOI: http://.org/10.1038/nm.3933  

  • August 23, 2015
  • 06:46 PM
  • 92 views

Men And Women: Similarities Or Differences?

by Alexis Delanoir in How to Paint Your Panda

It's a question that many people struggle with and has great implications for the study of our species: are men and women more alike than different or more different than alike, and what differences exist between the sexes?... Read more »

Hyde, J. (2014) Gender Similarities and Differences. Annual Review of Psychology, 65(1), 373-398. DOI: 10.1146/annurev-psych-010213-115057  

  • August 23, 2015
  • 01:49 PM
  • 108 views

Want a better relationship and a better sex life?

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

If men take up more of the child-care duties, splitting them equally with their female partners, heterosexual couples have more satisfaction with their relationships and their sex lives, according to new research by sociologists. The group used data from more than 900 heterosexual couples’ responses in the 2006 Marital Relationship Study (MARS).... Read more »

Daniel Fowler et al. (2015) Couples That Split Childcare Duties Have Higher Quality Relationships and Sex Lives . American Sociological Association. info:other/Link

  • August 20, 2015
  • 02:01 PM
  • 103 views

‘Memory region’ of the brain also involved in conflict resolution

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

The hippocampus in the brain’s temporal lobe is responsible for more than just long-term memory. Researchers have for the first time demonstrated that it is also involved in quick and successful conflict resolution.... Read more »

C.R. Oehrn, C. Baumann, J. Fell, H. Lee, H. Kessler, U. Habel, S. Hanslmayr, & N. Axmacher. (2015) Human hippocampal dynamics during response conflict. Current Biology. info:/10.1016/j.cub.2015.07.032

  • August 19, 2015
  • 03:43 PM
  • 122 views

Happiness spreads, but depression isn’t contagious

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Having friends who suffer from depression doesn’t affect the mental health of others, according to research. The team found that having friends can help teenagers recover from depression or even avoid becoming depressed in the first instance. The findings are the result of a study of the way teenagers in a group of US high schools influenced each others’ mood. The academics used a mathematical model to establish if depression spreads from friend to friend.... Read more »

E. M. Hill, F. E. Griffiths, & T. House. (2015) Spreading of healthy mood in adolescent social networks. Proceedings of the Royal Society B. info:/10.1098/rspb.2015.1180

  • August 19, 2015
  • 01:15 PM
  • 110 views

Don’t I know that guy? Neuroscientists pinpoint part of the brain that deciphers memory from new experience

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

You see a man at the grocery store. Is that the fellow you went to college with or just a guy who looks like him? One tiny spot in the brain has the answer. Neuroscientists have identified the part of the hippocampus that creates and processes this type of memory, furthering our understanding of how the mind works, and what’s going wrong when it doesn’t.... Read more »

  • August 18, 2015
  • 02:35 PM
  • 110 views

Nicotine changes marijuana’s effect on the brain

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

How scientists study the effects of marijuana on the brain is changing. Until recently marijuana research largely excluded tobacco users from its participant pool, but scientists have found reason to abandon this practice, uncovering significant differences in the brains of individuals who use both tobacco and marijuana and the brains of those who only use marijuana.... Read more »

  • August 17, 2015
  • 01:35 PM
  • 96 views

Study shows poor sleep contributes to MS-related fatigue

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

New research confirmed that sleep disturbances significantly contribute to MS-related fatigue, a common and often disabling symptom among individuals with MS. Review of the pertinent literature showed that sleep may be the dominant factor in fatigue in MS. This was also the finding in Dr. Strober’s study of 107 employed individuals with MS of whom 61% reported poor sleep.... Read more »

  • August 16, 2015
  • 02:06 PM
  • 116 views

The stomach is the way to a woman’s heart, too

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

You've heard that romance starts in the kitchen and not in the bedroom. Well, researchers at Drexel University finally have the science to support that saying - but not the way you might think. Researchers found that women's brains respond more to romantic cues on a full stomach than an empty one. The study explored brain circuitry in hungry versus satiated states among women who were past-dieters and those who had never dieted.... Read more »

  • August 14, 2015
  • 03:10 PM
  • 115 views

For fruit flies, sleep deprivation leads to less aggression and less sex

by Betty Zou in Eat, Read, Science

Sleep-deprived fruit flies exhibit less aggression which can be rescued by feeding them an octopamine agonist. Their reduced aggression negatively impacts their reproductive fitness and leads to fewer successful courtships.... Read more »

  • August 14, 2015
  • 02:05 PM
  • 130 views

Can your brain control how it loses control?

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

A new study may have unlocked understanding of a mysterious part of the brain — with implications for neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer’s. The results open up new areas of research in the pursuit of neuroprotective therapies.... Read more »

  • August 13, 2015
  • 02:52 PM
  • 134 views

Scientists discover what controls waking up and going to sleep

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Fifteen years ago, an odd mutant fruit fly caught the attention and curiosity of Dr. Ravi Allada, a circadian rhythms expert at Northwestern University, leading the neuroscientist to recently discover how an animal’s biological clock wakes it up in the morning and puts it to sleep at night. The clock’s mechanism, it turns out, is much like a light switch.... Read more »

Flourakis, M., Kula-Eversole, E., Hutchison, A., Han, T., Aranda, K., Moose, D., White, K., Dinner, A., Lear, B., Ren, D.... (2015) A Conserved Bicycle Model for Circadian Clock Control of Membrane Excitability. Cell, 162(4), 836-848. DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2015.07.036  

  • August 12, 2015
  • 12:54 PM
  • 141 views

Cognitive decision making as the collapse of a quantum superstate


by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Decision making in an enormous range of tasks involves the accumulation of evidence in support of different hypotheses. One of the enduring models of evidence accumulation is the Markov random walk (MRW) theory, which assigns a probability to each hypothesis. In an MRW model of decision making, when deciding between two hypotheses, the cumulative evidence for and against each hypothesis reaches different levels at different times, moving particle-like from state to state and only occupying a sin........ Read more »

  • August 11, 2015
  • 05:27 PM
  • 114 views

Study details ‘rotten egg’ gas’ role in autoimmune disease

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

The immune system not only responds to infections and other potentially problematic abnormalities in the body, it also contains a built-in brake in the form of regulatory T cells, or Tregs. Tregs ensure that inflammatory responses don’t get out of hand and do damage. In autoimmune diseases, sometimes these Treg cells don’t act as they should.... Read more »

  • August 10, 2015
  • 07:35 AM
  • 121 views

Will machine learning create new diagnostic categories, or just refine the ones we already have?

by The Neurocritic in The Neurocritic

How do we classify and diagnose mental disorders?In the coming era of Precision Medicine, we'll all want customized treatments that “take into account individual differences in people’s genes, environments, and lifestyles.” To do this, we'll need precise diagnostic tools to identify the specific disease process in each individual. Although focused on cancer in the near-term, the longer-term goal of the White House initiative is to apply Precision Medicine to all areas of health. This ........ Read more »

Insel, T., & Cuthbert, B. (2015) Brain disorders? Precisely. Science, 348(6234), 499-500. DOI: 10.1126/science.aab2358  

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