Post List

Neuroscience posts

(Modify Search »)

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,297 views

increasing women in neuroscience

by Ragamuffin in How We Are Hungry

The Department Chair Training to Increase Women in Neuroscience (IWiN) is scheduled to meetin in Tucson, at the University of Arizona this April. The workshop, funded by the National Science Foundation's ADVANCE program, is a three-year program aiming to increase the number of women on neurosciences faculty. The participants of these workshops expect to leave them with tools to implement recruitment and advancement plans for women within their universities, and to disseminate the informat........ Read more »

Mary Ann Mason, Marc Goulden, Karie Frasch. (2010) Keeping Women in the Science Pipeline. Focus on Workplace Flexibility. info:/

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,869 views

Why caffeine jacks you up

by DJ in Neuropoly

Recapping a cool study that locates where the receptors underlying the arousing effects of caffeine live in the brain....... Read more »

Lazarus M, Shen HY, Cherasse Y, Qu WM, Huang ZL, Bass CE, Winsky-Sommerer R, Semba K, Fredholm BB, Boison D.... (2011) Arousal Effect of Caffeine Depends on Adenosine A2A Receptors in the Shell of the Nucleus Accumbens. The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience, 31(27), 10067-10075. PMID: 21734299  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,866 views

2011: The Year in Drugs Deaths and data fraud

by Neurobonkers in Neurobonkers

A look at the biggest drugs news stories of the year and a statistical analysis of drugs deaths this year.... Read more »

Measham,F. Moore, K. Østergaard, J. (2011) Mephedrone, ‘‘Bubble’’ and unidentified white powders: the contested identities of synthetic ‘‘legal highs". DRUGS AND ALCOHOL TODAY, 137-146. info:/

Editorial team. (2010) The EMCDDA annual report 2010: the state of the drugs problem in Europe. The European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction, also published in Euro surveillance :European communicable disease bulletin, 15(46). PMID: 21144426  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,549 views

Copyright vs Medicine: If this topic isn’t covered in your newspaper this weekend, get a new newspaper

by Neurobonkers in Neurobonkers

After thirty years of silence, authors of a standard clinical psychiatric bedside test have issued take down orders of new medical research. Doctors who use copies of the bedside test which will have been printed in some of their oldest medical textbooks are liable to be sued for up to $150,000.... Read more »

Newman, J., & Feldman, R. (2011) Copyright and Open Access at the Bedside. New England Journal of Medicine, 365(26), 2447-2449. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMp1110652  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,635 views

Is this journal for real?

by Neurobonkers in Neurobonkers

This year 134 suspect new journals have appeared from the abyss, all published by the same clandestine company “Scientific & Academic Publishing, USA“... Read more »

Morrison, Heather. (2012) Scholarly Communication in Crisis. Freedom for scholarship in the internet age. Simon Fraser University School of Communication. info:/

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,194 views

Synthesising Pseudoephedrine From N-Methylamphetamine

by Neurobonkers in Neurobonkers

The paper describes how “in the past most stores were able to sell pseudoephedrine”, the US’s most popular decongestant but new laws require pharmacies, often with restricted opening hours to sell the medicine only to those carrying government issued ID. The paper argues that “it would be of great interest to have a simple synthesis of pseudoephedrine from reagents which can be more readily procured”. The study is published in the splendidly titled Journal of Apocry........ Read more »

Hai, O. Hakkenshit, I.B. (2012) A Simple and Convenient Synthesis of Pseudoephedrine From N-Methylamphetamine. Journal of Apocryphal Chemistry, 213-21. info:/1F.1BC9/b00000F00A

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,934 views

Parody: How to Synthesise Pseudoephedrine From N-Methylamphetamine

by Neurobonkers in Neurobonkers

Over in the US it has apparently become so difficult to get hold of pseudoephedrine (Sudafed), that one researcher has published a satirical paper explaining how to manufacture it out of crystal meth (PDF). The paper describes how “in the past most stores were able to sell pseudoephedrine”, the US’s most popular decongestant but new laws require only pharmacies, often with restricted opening hours to sell the medicine only to those carrying government issued ID. The paper argue........ Read more »

Hai, O. Hakkenshit, I.B. (2012) A Simple and Convenient Synthesis of Pseudoephedrine From N-Methylamphetamine. Journal of Apocryphal Chemistry. info:/

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,677 views

Coffee: a caffeinated chronicle

by Jordan Gaines in Gaines, on Brains

Because I like to understand what I'm putting in my body, I decided to explore coffee: its history, its neurological mechanism, and—what I'm sure everyone's dying to know—why it is so easy to become addicted and dependent on it.... Read more »

Cocker PJ, Hosking JG, Benoit J, & Winstanley CA. (2012) Sensitivity to Cognitive Effort Mediates Psychostimulant Effects on a Novel Rodent Cost/Benefit Decision-Making Task. Neuropsychopharmacology : official publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology. PMID: 22453140  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,722 views

Your Good Side Is the Left Side, According to Science

by United Academics in United Academics

Don’t give it any more thought: according to scientists, left side of the face usually looks better, mainly because it’s more expressive than the right side. Researchers at the Wake Forest University showed a series of photographs to 37 people, some of them mirror-reversed, so the viewers wouldn’t know which side they were looking at. In most cases, they chose the left side no matter where it was in the picture.... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,800 views

“Beware of Exercise” is a Sexy Headline

by nooffensebut in The Unsilenced Science

A new study that raised concerns about exercise should instead raise concerns about obesity.... Read more »

Claude Bouchard, Steven Blair, Timothy Church, Conrad Earnest, James Hagberg, Keijo Häkkinen, Nathan Jenkins, Laura Karavirta, William Kraus, Arthur Leon.... (2012) Adverse Metabolic Response to Regular Exercise: Is It a Rare or Common Occurrence?. PLOS One, 7(5). info:/10.1371/journal.pone.0037887

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,715 views

“Beware of Exercise” is a Sexy Headline

by nooffensebut in The Unsilenced Science

A new study that raised concerns about exercise should instead raise concerns about obesity.... Read more »

Claude Bouchard, Steven Blair, Timothy Church, Conrad Earnest, James Hagberg, Keijo Häkkinen, Nathan Jenkins, Laura Karavirta, William Kraus, Arthur Leon.... (2012) Adverse Metabolic Response to Regular Exercise: Is It a Rare or Common Occurrence?. PLOS One, 7(5). info:/10.1371/journal.pone.0037887

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,241 views

The Role of Feedback Is Overemphasized, Says Researcher

by United Academics in United Academics

No matter if it’s good or bad; when it comes to difficult decision-making tasks, feedback may make things even more confusing, according to new research published in the journal Frontiers in Neuroscience.... Read more »

Osman, M. (2012) The role of feedback in dynamic decision making. Frontiers in Decision Neuroscience. info:/

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,239 views

Genes Dealt Made Asians Svelte

by nooffensebut in The Unsilenced Science

Early genome-wide association studies suggest a genetic propensity to thinness in Asians. I review how these kinds of studies might be able reveal genetic racial differences in obesity and intelligence, and I address a few of the challenges to doing so.... Read more »

Belsky DW, Moffitt TE, Houts R, Bennett GG, Biddle AK, Blumenthal JA, Evans JP, Harrington H, Sugden K, Williams B.... (2012) Polygenic risk, rapid childhood growth, and the development of obesity: evidence from a 4-decade longitudinal study. Archives of pediatrics , 166(6), 515-21. PMID: 22665028  

Hsu FC, Lenchik L, Nicklas BJ, Lohman K, Register TC, Mychaleckyj J, Langefeld CD, Freedman BI, Bowden DW, & Carr JJ. (2005) Heritability of body composition measured by DXA in the diabetes heart study. Obesity research, 13(2), 312-9. PMID: 15800289  

Kilpeläinen TO, Zillikens MC, Stančákova A, Finucane FM, Ried JS, Langenberg C, Zhang W, Beckmann JS, Luan J, Vandenput L.... (2011) Genetic variation near IRS1 associates with reduced adiposity and an impaired metabolic profile. Nature genetics, 43(8), 753-60. PMID: 21706003  

Lohmueller KE, Indap AR, Schmidt S, Boyko AR, Hernandez RD, Hubisz MJ, Sninsky JJ, White TJ, Sunyaev SR, Nielsen R.... (2008) Proportionally more deleterious genetic variation in European than in African populations. Nature, 451(7181), 994-7. PMID: 18288194  

MacArthur DG, Balasubramanian S, Frankish A, Huang N, Morris J, Walter K, Jostins L, Habegger L, Pickrell JK, Montgomery SB.... (2012) A systematic survey of loss-of-function variants in human protein-coding genes. Science (New York, N.Y.), 335(6070), 823-8. PMID: 22344438  

Speliotes EK, Willer CJ, Berndt SI, Monda KL, Thorleifsson G, Jackson AU, Lango Allen H, Lindgren CM, Luan J, Mägi R.... (2010) Association analyses of 249,796 individuals reveal 18 new loci associated with body mass index. Nature genetics, 42(11), 937-48. PMID: 20935630  

Tennessen JA, Bigham AW, O'Connor TD, Fu W, Kenny EE, Gravel S, McGee S, Do R, Liu X, Jun G.... (2012) Evolution and functional impact of rare coding variation from deep sequencing of human exomes. Science (New York, N.Y.), 337(6090), 64-9. PMID: 22604720  

Zuk O, Hechter E, Sunyaev SR, & Lander ES. (2012) The mystery of missing heritability: Genetic interactions create phantom heritability. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 109(4), 1193-8. PMID: 22223662  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,798 views

Tadpoles see through their asses

by Papes in Sick Papes

A compelling example of the brain’s dynamic ballsiness (i.e., the ability of neural circuits to learn to detect unfamiliar sensory stimuli), is described in a recent exercise in sickness by the duo of Blackiston and Levin. ... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,631 views

a little bit of unpredictable stress everyday

by Mitchell Harden in Mitch's Blog

That is the recipe for depression. Chronic Mild Stress (CMS). Or at least it is the recipe I used to depress rats. As I mentioned earlier I worked with rats to research the mood-effects of Salvia. One important piece of this research was the idea that a depressed brain is different than a healthy brain and may respond differently to drug exposure. So in order to apply that in rats, I needed a way to create depressed rats. For me, that meant using CMS.
... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,669 views

Stress Leaves Its Mark on Dad’s Sperm

by Anouk Vleugels in United Academics

For the first time, researchers have found that stress can leave an epigenetic mark on sperm, which then alters the offspring’s hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, a part of the brain that deals with responding to stress. The study was published in the Journal of Neuroscience.... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,207 views

How Reliable Are Neuroimages?

by Tonya Sudiono in United Academics

Because of neuroscience, we are confronted with more and more pictures of brains in the newspapers and other media. But how reliable are these neuroimages? Here's what you didn’t know about neuroimaging techniques yet.... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,195 views

Spontaneous Alternation for T Maze, Y Maze

by Adam Maze Engineers in Maze Engineers

Spontaneous alternation behavior (SAB) is a fancy, sciency way of describing the natural tendency of animals (specifically mice/rats/rodents) to alternate which arms of a maze they choose to check out. Unlike the tests for reference and working memory that we discussed last week, when studying spatial memory through observation of spontaneous alternation behavior, the arms of the mazes do not contain any reward. Mice are simply put into the maze, allowed to explore, and their sequence of choices........ Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,097 views

‘Hotspots’ for DNA breakage in neurons may promote brain genetic diversity, disease

by Tom Ulrich in Vector, a Boston Children's Hospital blog

As organs go, the brain seems to harbor an abundance of somatic mutations — genetic variants that arise after conception and affect only some of our neurons. In one recent study, researchers found about 1,500 variants in each of neurons they sampled.

New research revealing the propensity of DNA to break in certain spots backs up the idea of a genetically diverse brain. Reported in Cell last month, it also suggests a new avenue for thinking about brain development, brain tumors and neuro........ Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 822 views

The geometry of consciousness is a multi-dimensional math trip

by amanda alvarez in It Ain't Magic

Amanda Alvarez writes about how neuroscientists are studying consciousness with mathematics.... Read more »

Oizumi M, Tsuchiya N, & Amari SI. (2016) Unified framework for information integration based on information geometry. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 113(51), 14817-14822. PMID: 27930289  

join us!

Do you write about peer-reviewed research in your blog? Use ResearchBlogging.org to make it easy for your readers — and others from around the world — to find your serious posts about academic research.

If you don't have a blog, you can still use our site to learn about fascinating developments in cutting-edge research from around the world.

Register Now

Research Blogging is powered by SRI Technology.

To learn more, visit http://selfregulationinstitute.org/.