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  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 3,397 views

Men interested in immediate sex place higher priority on a woman's body than the average. Go fig.

by EcoPhysioMichelle in C6-H12-O6

Instead of blogging about poop I decided to blog about sex today. I'm terribly sorry for those of you who may have been expecting fecal matters. Anyway, from the File of Terribly Obvious Stuff, today I bring you a study that states that men who are looking for long-term partners pay more attention to a woman's face, whereas men looking for short-term partners pay more attention to a woman's body. I know, I know, your mind is blown, right? ... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,957 views

in indirect support of the hygiene hypothesis

by Ragamuffin in How We Are Hungry

A recent study out of the University of Michigan Medical School suggests that the stomach bacterium Helicobacter pylori protects against inflammation caused by Salmonella in a mouse model of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD).... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,023 views

Let’s Get Cellular: Meth Metabolism

by Dirk Hanson in Addiction Inbox

We know from the work of Nora Volkow and others that meth abusers have chronically low levels of dopamine D2 receptors in their brains. But what is going on in the rest of the body when methamphetamine addiction is running full force?... Read more »

Sun, L., Li, H., Seufferheld, M., Walters, K., Margam, V., Jannasch, A., Diaz, N., Riley, C., Sun, W., Li, Y.... (2011) Systems-Scale Analysis Reveals Pathways Involved in Cellular Response to Methamphetamine. PLoS ONE, 6(4). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0018215  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,266 views

Let’s Get Cellular: Meth Metabolism

by Dirk Hanson in Addiction Inbox

We know from the work of Nora Volkow and others that meth abusers have chronically low levels of dopamine D2 receptors in their brains. But what is going on in the rest of the body when methamphetamine addiction is running full force?... Read more »

Sun, L., Li, H., Seufferheld, M., Walters, K., Margam, V., Jannasch, A., Diaz, N., Riley, C., Sun, W., Li, Y.... (2011) Systems-Scale Analysis Reveals Pathways Involved in Cellular Response to Methamphetamine. PLoS ONE, 6(4). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0018215  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,949 views

Minding As and P: Can Arsenic Substitute for Phosphorus or Not?

by Sara Klink in Promega Connections

Back in December 2010, there was a press conference held by NASA to announce the discovery of a bacterium found in a high salt, high pH lake with high concentrations of arsenic that seemed to have substituted arsenic for phosphorus in the bacterium’s biomolecules. This set off a wave of response in the blogosphere regarding what Felisa Wolfe-Simon and her team did nor did not do to confirm arsenic was incorporated into DNA molecules. Controversy ranged from the ability of arsenic to form a sta........ Read more »

Wolfe-Simon, F., Blum, J., Kulp, T., Gordon, G., Hoeft, S., Pett-Ridge, J., Stolz, J., Webb, S., Weber, P., Davies, P.... (2011) Response to Comments on "A Bacterium That Can Grow Using Arsenic Instead of Phosphorus". Science. DOI: 10.1126/science.1202098  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,206 views

Crystal structure solved by protein folding game players

by Olexandr Isayev in olexandrisayev.com

Following the failure of a wide range of attempts to solve the crystal structure of M-PMV retroviral protease by molecular replacement, authors challenged players of the protein folding game Foldit to produce accurate models of the protein. Remarkably, Foldit players were able to generate models of sufficient quality for successful molecular replacement and subsequent structure determination.... Read more »

Khatib, F., DiMaio, F., Cooper, S., Kazmierczyk, M., Gilski, M., Krzywda, S., Zabranska, H., Pichova, I., Thompson, J., Popović, Z.... (2011) Crystal structure of a monomeric retroviral protease solved by protein folding game players. Nature Structural . DOI: 10.1038/nsmb.2119  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,661 views

Harmful genes, and sneaky, too: Genetic hitchhiking in the human genome

by Stephen Matheson in Quintessence of Dust

Genetic hitchhiking is thought to be an inevitable result of strong positive selection in a population. The basic idea is that if a particular gene is strongly selected for (as opposed to selected against), then the chunk of the genome that carries that gene will become very common in the population. The result is a local loss of genetic diversity: all (or nearly all) of the individuals in the population will have that same chunk of genetic information, whereas before the selection process acted........ Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,331 views

Comparing Apples with Oranges: B&W

by Peter Nollert in Protein Crystallization Blog

Identifying individual amino acid residues within a GPCR and comparing these across different receptors is a routine task that’s helped by a widely accepted nomenclature system: that of Ballesteros and Weinstein.... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 3,082 views

Do OTC Head Louse Treatments Work? Part 2: Questionable treatments

by Joe Ballenger in Cheshire

Many treatments for head lice on the market claim to be effective, but this is not backed up by evidence. Many head louse treatment manufacturers make claims of efficacy which go above and beyond the evidence behind their products.... Read more »

Burgess, I. (2009) Current treatments for pediculosis capitis. Current Opinion in Infectious Diseases, 22(2), 131-136. DOI: 10.1097/QCO.0b013e328322a019  

Canyon, D., & Speare, R. (2007) Do head lice spread in swimming pools?. International Journal of Dermatology, 46(11), 1211-1213. DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-4632.2007.03011.x  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,041 views

Bays by the bay

by aewills in A Bouquet From Mendel

The California Bay tree (Umbellularia californica) is introduced, and a paper is discussed about headaches caused by the Bay tree ketone Umbellulone.... Read more »

Nassini R, Materazzi S, Vriens J, Prenen J, Benemei S, De Siena G, la Marca G, Andrè E, Preti D, Avonto C.... (2011) The 'headache tree' via umbellulone and TRPA1 activates the trigeminovascular system. Brain : a journal of neurology. PMID: 22036959  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,598 views

Detecting Gene Doping in Sports: MicroRNA biomarker sought

by Nicole Kelesoglu in E3 Engaging Epigenetics Experts

WADA funds research into developing detection methods for the emerging threat of gene doping in sports.... Read more »

Elmo W.I. Neuberger, Magdelena Jurkiewicz, Dirk A. Moser and Perikles Simon. (2012) Detection of EPO gene doping in blood. Drug Testt. Analysis. DOI: 10.1002/dta.1347  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,239 views

Genes Dealt Made Asians Svelte

by nooffensebut in The Unsilenced Science

Early genome-wide association studies suggest a genetic propensity to thinness in Asians. I review how these kinds of studies might be able reveal genetic racial differences in obesity and intelligence, and I address a few of the challenges to doing so.... Read more »

Belsky DW, Moffitt TE, Houts R, Bennett GG, Biddle AK, Blumenthal JA, Evans JP, Harrington H, Sugden K, Williams B.... (2012) Polygenic risk, rapid childhood growth, and the development of obesity: evidence from a 4-decade longitudinal study. Archives of pediatrics , 166(6), 515-21. PMID: 22665028  

Hsu FC, Lenchik L, Nicklas BJ, Lohman K, Register TC, Mychaleckyj J, Langefeld CD, Freedman BI, Bowden DW, & Carr JJ. (2005) Heritability of body composition measured by DXA in the diabetes heart study. Obesity research, 13(2), 312-9. PMID: 15800289  

Kilpeläinen TO, Zillikens MC, Stančákova A, Finucane FM, Ried JS, Langenberg C, Zhang W, Beckmann JS, Luan J, Vandenput L.... (2011) Genetic variation near IRS1 associates with reduced adiposity and an impaired metabolic profile. Nature genetics, 43(8), 753-60. PMID: 21706003  

Lohmueller KE, Indap AR, Schmidt S, Boyko AR, Hernandez RD, Hubisz MJ, Sninsky JJ, White TJ, Sunyaev SR, Nielsen R.... (2008) Proportionally more deleterious genetic variation in European than in African populations. Nature, 451(7181), 994-7. PMID: 18288194  

MacArthur DG, Balasubramanian S, Frankish A, Huang N, Morris J, Walter K, Jostins L, Habegger L, Pickrell JK, Montgomery SB.... (2012) A systematic survey of loss-of-function variants in human protein-coding genes. Science (New York, N.Y.), 335(6070), 823-8. PMID: 22344438  

Speliotes EK, Willer CJ, Berndt SI, Monda KL, Thorleifsson G, Jackson AU, Lango Allen H, Lindgren CM, Luan J, Mägi R.... (2010) Association analyses of 249,796 individuals reveal 18 new loci associated with body mass index. Nature genetics, 42(11), 937-48. PMID: 20935630  

Tennessen JA, Bigham AW, O'Connor TD, Fu W, Kenny EE, Gravel S, McGee S, Do R, Liu X, Jun G.... (2012) Evolution and functional impact of rare coding variation from deep sequencing of human exomes. Science (New York, N.Y.), 337(6090), 64-9. PMID: 22604720  

Zuk O, Hechter E, Sunyaev SR, & Lander ES. (2012) The mystery of missing heritability: Genetic interactions create phantom heritability. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 109(4), 1193-8. PMID: 22223662  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,593 views

Tet1 Enzyme Based Enrichment Method for Methylome Sequencing: TamC-Seq

by Nicole Kelesoglu in E3 Engaging Epigenetics Experts

Summary of a recent Nature paper that details a new inexpensive, enzyme based enrichment method for methylome sequencing. ... Read more »

Zhang L, Szulwach KE, Hon GC, Song CX, Park B, Yu M, Lu X, Dai Q, Wang X, Street CR.... (2013) Tet-mediated covalent labelling of 5-methylcytosine for its genome-wide detection and sequencing. Nature communications, 1517. PMID: 23443545  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,106 views

Five things to think about when preparing glycoproteins for crystallization:

by Dave Dilyx in Protein Solubility Blog

So, you have decided to crystallize your glycoprotein. First for the bad news, protein crystallization is difficult; it is not called the bottleneck of crystallography for nothing. When you want to crystallize a glycoprotein your problems are compounded because glycosylation is usually heterogeneous and can interfere with crystallization. However, there is good news, crystallographers believe that all proteins can be crystallized; it is just a matter of hard work and determination. A major prob........ Read more »

Chang, V., Crispin, M., Aricescu, A., Harvey, D., Nettleship, J., Fennelly, J., Yu, C., Boles, K., Evans, E., Stuart, D.... (2007) Glycoprotein Structural Genomics: Solving the Glycosylation Problem. Structure, 15(3), 267-273. DOI: 10.1016/j.str.2007.01.011  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,669 views

Stress Leaves Its Mark on Dad’s Sperm

by Anouk Vleugels in United Academics

For the first time, researchers have found that stress can leave an epigenetic mark on sperm, which then alters the offspring’s hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, a part of the brain that deals with responding to stress. The study was published in the Journal of Neuroscience.... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,251 views

Medicine goes under the Needle

by James Dunce in Antisense Science

Tattoo artists may soon be faced with the prospect of a career change into the world of medicine thanks to the revelation that tattooing technology can be effectively applied in the delivery of vaccines and anti-parasitic drugs to the upper layers of the dermis.... Read more »

Shio MT, Paquet M, Martel C, Bosschaerts T, Stienstra S, Olivier M, & Fortin A. (2014) Drug delivery by tattooing to treat cutaneous leishmaniasis. Scientific reports, 4156. PMID: 24561704  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,190 views

Interlukin 32 biomarker which predict relapse of mycobacterium tuberculosis

by B V Waghmare in HIV virus and antiretroviral drugs and antiAIDS vaccine research and developmets

Interlukin 32 a protien which is found in people which do test positie for mycobacterium tuberculosis infection but do not develop pulmonary disease, it is found that interlukin is important in killing micobacterium, thereby protect them from TB disease, this interleukin 32 can be used therapeutically in patients suffering with TB along with chemotherapy, which will enhance efficacy of anti tuberculosis chemo therapy... Read more »

B V Waghmare. (2014) Interlukin 32 biomarker that will predict relapse of tuberculosis infection and will be used in treatment of TB. http://www.medicalwebsite.org/2014/09/protein-that-protect-from-tb-infection.html. info:/

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 528 views

FDA officially refers consumers to Wikipedia for information on food pathogens

by Austin Bouck in Animal Science Review

I was perusing the Bad Bug Book while doing some research on the recent Blue Bell outbreak and came across a hyperlink. After hearing “do you want to know more?” in my head I clicked through on some non-L. mono species of Listeria and was…confused. I quickly doubled back, thinking that maybe I had been redirected, but there it was...... Read more »

Food and Drug Administration. (2012) Listeria Monocytogenes. Bad Bug Book, Foodborne pathogenic microorganisms and natural toxins. Second Edition, 99-100. info:/

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 621 views

Zebrafish model of early stage human ccRCC

by Joana Guedes in BHD Research Blog

Von Hippel–Lindau (VHL) disease is caused by a germline mutation in the VHL gene that leads to the development of several tumors including clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) (Maher and Kaelin, 1997). ‘Clear cell’ tumors are characterized by large, proliferating epithelial cells with clear cytoplasm, and a reduced number of cilia. VHL inactivation leads to the stabilization of hypoxia inducible factors 1a and 2a (HIF1a and HIF2a) that leads to up-regulation of genes involve........ Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 546 views

Highlights from the RLDC 2016 Cincinnati Conference

by Joana Guedes in BHD Research Blog

As mentioned in last week’s blog, the International Rare Lung Diseases Research Conference (RLDC) was held in Cincinnati, USA, 22nd-25th September. Clinicians, scientists, patient organizations, patients and families were brought together to discuss research and clinical trials in rare lung disease and to promote dialogue between the research community and patients.... Read more »

McCormack FX, Inoue Y, Moss J, Singer LG, Strange C, Nakata K, Barker AF, Chapman JT, Brantly ML, Stocks JM, Brown KK, Lynch JP 3rd, Goldberg HJ, Young LR, Kinder BW, Downey GP, Sullivan EJ, Colby TV, McKay RT, Cohen MM, Korbee L, Taveira-DaSilva AM, Lee . (2011) Efficacy and Safety of Sirolimus in Lymphangioleiomyomatosis. New England Journal of Medicine, 365(3), 271-272. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMc1106358  

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