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  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,592 views

Cheap Cell-Phone Microscopes Might Make Distance Ed Science Labs Feasible

by Michael Windelspecht in RicochetScience

Review of recent advances in cell phone microscopes... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,955 views

in indirect support of the hygiene hypothesis

by Ragamuffin in How We Are Hungry

A recent study out of the University of Michigan Medical School suggests that the stomach bacterium Helicobacter pylori protects against inflammation caused by Salmonella in a mouse model of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD).... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,021 views

Let’s Get Cellular: Meth Metabolism

by Dirk Hanson in Addiction Inbox

We know from the work of Nora Volkow and others that meth abusers have chronically low levels of dopamine D2 receptors in their brains. But what is going on in the rest of the body when methamphetamine addiction is running full force?... Read more »

Sun, L., Li, H., Seufferheld, M., Walters, K., Margam, V., Jannasch, A., Diaz, N., Riley, C., Sun, W., Li, Y.... (2011) Systems-Scale Analysis Reveals Pathways Involved in Cellular Response to Methamphetamine. PLoS ONE, 6(4). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0018215  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,264 views

Let’s Get Cellular: Meth Metabolism

by Dirk Hanson in Addiction Inbox

We know from the work of Nora Volkow and others that meth abusers have chronically low levels of dopamine D2 receptors in their brains. But what is going on in the rest of the body when methamphetamine addiction is running full force?... Read more »

Sun, L., Li, H., Seufferheld, M., Walters, K., Margam, V., Jannasch, A., Diaz, N., Riley, C., Sun, W., Li, Y.... (2011) Systems-Scale Analysis Reveals Pathways Involved in Cellular Response to Methamphetamine. PLoS ONE, 6(4). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0018215  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,949 views

Minding As and P: Can Arsenic Substitute for Phosphorus or Not?

by Sara Klink in Promega Connections

Back in December 2010, there was a press conference held by NASA to announce the discovery of a bacterium found in a high salt, high pH lake with high concentrations of arsenic that seemed to have substituted arsenic for phosphorus in the bacterium’s biomolecules. This set off a wave of response in the blogosphere regarding what Felisa Wolfe-Simon and her team did nor did not do to confirm arsenic was incorporated into DNA molecules. Controversy ranged from the ability of arsenic to form a sta........ Read more »

Wolfe-Simon, F., Blum, J., Kulp, T., Gordon, G., Hoeft, S., Pett-Ridge, J., Stolz, J., Webb, S., Weber, P., Davies, P.... (2011) Response to Comments on "A Bacterium That Can Grow Using Arsenic Instead of Phosphorus". Science. DOI: 10.1126/science.1202098  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,658 views

Harmful genes, and sneaky, too: Genetic hitchhiking in the human genome

by Stephen Matheson in Quintessence of Dust

Genetic hitchhiking is thought to be an inevitable result of strong positive selection in a population. The basic idea is that if a particular gene is strongly selected for (as opposed to selected against), then the chunk of the genome that carries that gene will become very common in the population. The result is a local loss of genetic diversity: all (or nearly all) of the individuals in the population will have that same chunk of genetic information, whereas before the selection process acted........ Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,039 views

Bays by the bay

by aewills in A Bouquet From Mendel

The California Bay tree (Umbellularia californica) is introduced, and a paper is discussed about headaches caused by the Bay tree ketone Umbellulone.... Read more »

Nassini R, Materazzi S, Vriens J, Prenen J, Benemei S, De Siena G, la Marca G, Andrè E, Preti D, Avonto C.... (2011) The 'headache tree' via umbellulone and TRPA1 activates the trigeminovascular system. Brain : a journal of neurology. PMID: 22036959  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,295 views

Mapping future climate space

by brettcherry in Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience Blog

By mapping climate suitability for plant species researchers are able to understand how climate change can affect biodiversity or determine suitable climates in the future for different plants. ... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,581 views

Viral MicroRNA Mimicing Cellular MicroRNA? and a New Dual-Fluuorescent Reporter System

by Nicole Kelesoglu in E3 Engaging Epigenetics Experts

Researchers from Chinese Academy of Sciences design a clever, single plasmid, dual-fluorescent reporter system to show more viral microRNAs functioning like cellular microRNAs. ... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,597 views

Detecting Gene Doping in Sports: MicroRNA biomarker sought

by Nicole Kelesoglu in E3 Engaging Epigenetics Experts

WADA funds research into developing detection methods for the emerging threat of gene doping in sports.... Read more »

Elmo W.I. Neuberger, Magdelena Jurkiewicz, Dirk A. Moser and Perikles Simon. (2012) Detection of EPO gene doping in blood. Drug Testt. Analysis. DOI: 10.1002/dta.1347  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 3,945 views

Lions And Tigers And Ligers, Oh My!

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

Geographic isolation is often involved in speciation events. Here are examples of hybrid speciation involving a very localized isolation and a mating choice behavior.... Read more »

Jesús Mavárez1, Camilo A. Salazar, Eldredge Bermingham1, Christian Salcedo, Chris D. Jiggins . (2006) Speciation by hybridization in Heliconius butterflies. Nature, 868-871. DOI: 10.1038/nature04738  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,383 views

Methylomes in Lethal Prostate Cancer Support Personalized Medicine

by Nicole Kelesoglu in E3 Engaging Epigenetics Experts

Recent surprising evidence has shown that metastatic tumors usually do not vary in their genomes within an individual. Yet, these tumors behave differently at different sites around the body. Does that mean that epigenetic profiling will be too variable to target for cancer treatment? In a word, no.... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,147 views

The good, bad, and ugly of protein refolding

by Scott Jeffers in Protein Solubility Blog

The good news is that 95% of the protein aggregates in the inclusion body are your protein of interest. To get a 95% pure sample of protein you just have to lyse the cells using your preferred method (sonication works well, as does French press) in a lyses buffer containing Triton X-100. You then centrifuge your inclusion bodies containing your aggregated protein and discard the soluble supernatant. Next, you wash your inclusion body pellet in lysis buffer without Triton X-100 to remove the dete........ Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,103 views

Five things to think about when preparing glycoproteins for crystallization:

by Dave Dilyx in Protein Solubility Blog

So, you have decided to crystallize your glycoprotein. First for the bad news, protein crystallization is difficult; it is not called the bottleneck of crystallography for nothing. When you want to crystallize a glycoprotein your problems are compounded because glycosylation is usually heterogeneous and can interfere with crystallization. However, there is good news, crystallographers believe that all proteins can be crystallized; it is just a matter of hard work and determination. A major prob........ Read more »

Chang, V., Crispin, M., Aricescu, A., Harvey, D., Nettleship, J., Fennelly, J., Yu, C., Boles, K., Evans, E., Stuart, D.... (2007) Glycoprotein Structural Genomics: Solving the Glycosylation Problem. Structure, 15(3), 267-273. DOI: 10.1016/j.str.2007.01.011  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,380 views

The case of the missing genitalia: copulation costs for male spiders

by Chris Buddle in Arthropod Ecology

Male spiders can be missing their organs (pedipalps) and this is clearly quite a cost for their fitness! This post explores this topic, with some original data, and with some discussion of past literature on the topic.... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,864 views

To Bee Or Not To Bee: How Bees Avoid Difficult Choices

by Jalees Rehman in Fragments of Truth

Humans who are faced with difficult choices are often tempted to simply opt out of making a choice, especially when they realize that they cannot easily resolve their uncertainty as to which choice is the better choice. Some researchers consider this ability to opt out as an indicator of “meta-cognition”, a term used to describe “thinking about thinking”. Instead of plowing ahead with a random choice, humans can recognize that they lack adequate information and choose not........ Read more »

Clint J. Perry, & Andrew B. Barron. (2013) Honey bees selectively avoid difficult choices. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1314571110  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,220 views

IS THIS A BANANA I SEE BEFORE ME? SEEING COLOURS THAT AREN’T THERE

by A Giffen in Antisense Science

We all know that bananas are yellow, strawberries are red and oranges are…well orange. But what about a black and white banana? Or a grayscale green bean? Well it turns out our brain still processes these images in the colour we think they should be in.Banana

In a study carried out earlier this year, neuroscientists showed there was a link between our memories, our knowledge of object colour and the way neuronal networks in the brain perceive the object when presented in black and whit........ Read more »

Bannert MM, & Bartels A. (2013) Decoding the Yellow of a Gray Banana. Current biology : CB. PMID: 24184103  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,532 views

A field guide to whole-genome analyses

by Mauro Mandrioli in The aphid room

Genome sequencing projects have been for long time possible goals for few model organisms and required the concerted effort of large consortia, but now...... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,455 views

At the origin of the aphid-ant mutualism

by Mauro Mandrioli in The aphid room

Several hemipteran species are involved in mutualistic relationships with ants so that aphids produce honeydew, a sweet waste product enriched in sugar and aminoacids, that ants collect as a supply for their diet. In return...... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 924 views

PD-L1 expression associates with non-inactivated VHL ccRCC

by Joana Guedes in BHD Research Blog

The loss of the of the tumor suppressor gene VHL and the subsequent deregulation of VHL/HIF/VEGF signalling are known to play a role in development of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). Renal tumours associated with BHD syndrome are histologically diverse and include a percentage of ccRCC (Pavlovich et al., 2002). Anti-angiogenic therapies targeting the VHL/HIF/VEGF pathway have emerged in past years (Rini et al., 2006) but the development of resistance to these therapeutic agents is leadi........ Read more »

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