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  • November 21, 2014
  • 05:58 AM
  • 10 views

Genomic instability not linked to autism?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

An eyebrow was raised upon reading the findings reported by Penelope Main and colleagues [1] concluding that: "it appears unlikely that genomic instability is a feature of the aetiology of autism." Based on results derived in part from "the cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome (CBMN-cyt) assay" [2] looking at markers of DNA damage, authors reported very little to see in their small cohort of children with autism (n=35) compared with siblings (n=27) and asymptomatic controls (n=25) although with........ Read more »

Main PA, Thomas P, Angley MT, Young R, Esterman A, King CE, & Fenech MF. (2014) Lack of Evidence for Genomic Instability in Autistic Children as Measured by the Cytokinesis-Block Micronucleus Cytome Assay. Autism research : official journal of the International Society for Autism Research. PMID: 25371234  

  • November 21, 2014
  • 04:41 AM
  • 12 views

Non-Sticky Nano Bullets Targeting Cancer

by Agnese Mariotti in United Academics

Researchers describe the use of traceable nanoparticles constructed to specifically target tumors. These drug loaded nano particles could function as ‘intelligent’ bullets, leaving body in 72 hours.... Read more »

Phillips E, Penate-Medina O, Zanzonico PB, Carvajal RD, Mohan P, Ye Y, Humm J, Gönen M, Kalaigian H, Schöder H.... (2014) Clinical translation of an ultrasmall inorganic optical-PET imaging nanoparticle probe. Science translational medicine, 6(260). PMID: 25355699  

  • November 21, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 12 views

Can Low Back Pain in Young Athletes be Treated and Prevented?

by Adam Scott and Jan Bruins in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Increased training time in sports that require a forward lean posture can predispose young athletes to low back pain.... Read more »

  • November 20, 2014
  • 04:21 PM
  • 27 views

Designing a better flu vaccine

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

We all hate getting sick and the seasonal flu vaccine can help prevent a time of serious illness. Unfortunately the vaccine is usually an educated guess as to which strains of the flu are going to be most prevalent that year. Well now an international team of researchers has shown that it may be possible to improve the effectiveness of the seasonal flu vaccine by 'pre-empting' the evolution of the influenza virus.... Read more »

Fonville, J., Wilks, S., James, S., Fox, A., Ventresca, M., Aban, M., Xue, L., Jones, T., Le N. M. H., ., Pham Q. T., .... (2014) Antibody landscapes after influenza virus infection or vaccination. Science, 346(6212), 996-1000. DOI: 10.1126/science.1256427  

  • November 20, 2014
  • 05:30 AM
  • 43 views

Intestinal permeability: an emerging scientific area (also with autism in mind)

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

What is the intestinal barrier? What is intestinal permeability? What factors affect the permeability of the intestinal barrier? How do you measure intestinal permeability? How might [altered] intestinal permeability link to health, well-being and various clinical diagnoses?The new triad @ Bischoff SC et al. 2014These are some of the questions tackled by the excellent open-access review by Stephan Bischoff and colleagues [1] which I would like to draw your attention to i........ Read more »

Bischoff, S., Barbara, G., Buurman, W., Ockhuizen, T., Schulzke, J., Serino, M., Tilg, H., Watson, A., & Wells, J. (2014) Intestinal permeability - a new target for disease prevention and therapy. BMC Gastroenterology, 14(1), 189. DOI: 10.1186/s12876-014-0189-7  

  • November 20, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 42 views

To Remove or not to Remove? That is the Question When Dealing with CPR Emergencies in Football

by Daniel Wager and Erin Oliver in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Football shoulder pads create a barrier for a rescuer who has to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation on an athlete who is suffering from sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). Performing chest compressions under the shoulder pads, which increases compression depth, may be more effective in saving an SCA victim’s life.... Read more »

  • November 19, 2014
  • 02:24 PM
  • 58 views

How gut microbiota changes the blood-brain barrier

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Don’t be alarmed, but we are outnumbered. When figuring out what makes us, “us” we need to remember that there are far more bacteria genes in us than human genes, by recent counts it’s something like 360 to 1. We also know that your stomach can change your cravings, but now we know that your stomach affects more than just your thoughts. Your stomach can control what can get to your brain.... Read more »

Viorica Braniste, Maha Al-Asmakh, Czeslawa Kowal, Farhana Anuar, Afrouz Abbaspour, Miklós Tóth, Agata Korecka, Nadja Bakocevic, Ng Lai Guan, Parag Kundu.... (2014) The gut microbiota influences blood-brain barrier permeability in mice. Science Translational Medicine. info:/10.1126/scitranslmed.3009759

  • November 19, 2014
  • 09:25 AM
  • 60 views

A Meal More Powerful Than The NFL

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

Tryptophan supposedly puts you to sleep at Thanksgiving, but research shows that turkey isn’t really that high in this amino acid. On the other hand, tryptophan can save lives. In several old cultures, human sacrifices increased during periods of the year when tryptophan levels in the diet were low. ... Read more »

  • November 19, 2014
  • 04:57 AM
  • 49 views

Down Syndrome Disintegrative Disorder

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"Down syndrome disintegrative disorder seems an appropriate name for this newly recognized clinical association, which may be due to autoimmunity.""Hi, everyone. I'm Olaf and I like warm hugs!"That was the bottom line of the study published by Gordon Worley and colleagues [1] reviewing a small number of cases (N=11) of children diagnosed with Down's syndrome presenting at clinic "with a history of new-onset... or worsening... autistic characteristics" among other things. Based on some potentiall........ Read more »

  • November 19, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 50 views

Are They Really up to the Task or is it Just Sandbagging?

by Kyle Harris in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Among athletes with an invalid computerized neurocognitive test at baseline, 87% received valid scores upon reassessment, which suggests reassessment can be used to gain a valid baseline score.... Read more »

Schatz, P., Kelley, T., Ott, S., Solomon, G., Elbin, R., Higgins, K., & Moser, R. (2014) Utility of Repeated Assessment After Invalid Baseline Neurocognitive Test Performance. Journal of Athletic Training, 49(5), 659-664. DOI: 10.4085/1062-6050-49.3.37  

  • November 18, 2014
  • 05:14 PM
  • 71 views

Does brain training really work?

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Ever wonder if you could be the next Einstein if only you could do some brain training? Well as it turns out, while computer based ‘brain training’ can boost memory and thinking skills in older adults, many programs promoted by the $1 billion brain training industry are ineffective.... Read more »

  • November 18, 2014
  • 01:15 PM
  • 55 views

From H. pylori to Spanish colonialism: the scales of cancer.

by Artem Kaznatcheev in Evolutionary Games Group

Yesterday was the first day of the 4th Integrated Mathematical Oncology Workshop here at Moffitt. This year, it is run jointly with the Center for Infection Research in Cancer and is thus focused on the interaction of infection disease and cancer. This is a topic that I have not focused much attention on — except […]... Read more »

Kodaman, N., Pazos, A., Schneider, B.G., Piazuelo, M.B., Mera, R., Sobota, R.S., Sicinschi, L.A., Shaffer, C.L., Romero-Gallo, J., de Sablet, T.... (2014) Human and Helicobacter pylori coevolution shapes the risk of gastric disease. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 111(4), 1455-60. PMID: 24474772  

  • November 18, 2014
  • 08:00 AM
  • 53 views

This Is Your TV On Drugs

by Mark E. Lasbury in The 'Scope

There are more than 100 drug commercials on TV every hour of every day. Why? Because they work. Research shows that advertised drugs are prescribed 9x more than comparable drugs that aren’t advertised. And all those side effect notices? The drug companies like them because research says that all you remember is that they were “honest” with you.... Read more »

  • November 18, 2014
  • 04:52 AM
  • 36 views

Paediatric congenital heart disease and autism risk?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"Children aged 2-17 with CHD [congenital heart disease] were more likely than those without CHD to have had a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (crude OR, 4.6; 95% CI, 1.9-11.0) or intellectual disability (Crude OR, 9.1; 95% CI, 5.4-15.4)".The traveller @ Wikipedia That was a key conclusion reported in the study by Hilda Razzaghi and colleagues [1] based on their analysis of data from "the 1997-2011 National Health Interview Survey", a US initiative which aims to pro........ Read more »

  • November 18, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 57 views

Psychological Strategies Effectively Reduce Perceived and Physiological Markers of Stress

by Caitlin Dios & Bryan Pope in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Both cognitive and somatic relaxation strategies reduce perceived stress and physiological markers of stress.... Read more »

  • November 17, 2014
  • 04:41 AM
  • 63 views

Social anxiety in one in four adults with autism

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"Twenty-eight percent (14 of 50) of individuals with ASD [autism spectrum disorder] fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for SAD [social anxiety disorder]"."I am Vulcan, sir. We embrace technicality."So said the findings reported by Susanne Bejerot and colleagues [1] (open-access) as part of their investigations looking at SAD occurrence among adults diagnosed with ASD. Once again the sometimes very disabling issue of anxiety resurfaces with autism in mind. Before going on, I'm minde........ Read more »

Bejerot S, Eriksson JM, & Mörtberg E. (2014) Social anxiety in adult autism spectrum disorder. Psychiatry research. PMID: 25200187  

  • November 17, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 50 views

Tag Us In! What Do Coaches Know About Exertional Heat Stroke and the Role of the Athletic Trainer?

by Yanira Dawson, Crystal Petrus, Savannah Kuester in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

High school football coaches are confident in their ability to handle exertional heat stroke but their knowledge is limited in this area. The coaches value and understand the role of athletic trainers.... Read more »

  • November 16, 2014
  • 01:47 PM
  • 68 views

Soldiers and Suicide: A familiar tale

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

As a Marine, there is a special place in my heart for all things military. While most protesters are busy arguing about the people who are dying overseas, there is an even more disheartening statistic — the suicide statistics of service members here at home. Suicide is an ugly word, so it’s no surprise that there is not a large movement fighting for better care and a new study done on soldiers doesn’t help.... Read more »

  • November 15, 2014
  • 12:09 PM
  • 80 views

Telomeres, Epigenetics, and Aging: the new found complexities in your genes

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Telomere length is associated with aging, this isn’t a new statement, but interestingly enough there is more to this story than just the size of your telomeres. Telomere lengths have now been shown to cause epigenetic changes, this new discovery may help explain the aging of cells and how they initiate and transmit disease.... Read more »

Jerome D. Robin,, Andrew T. Ludlow,, Kimberly Batten,, Frederique Magdinier,, Guido Stadler,, Kathyrin R. Wagner,, Jerry W. Shay,, & Woodring E. Wright. (2014) Telomere position effect: regulation of gene expression with progressive telomere shortening over long distances. Genes . info:/

  • November 15, 2014
  • 04:40 AM
  • 72 views

Milk has gotta lotta bottle?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"High milk intake was associated with higher mortality in one cohort of women and in another cohort of men, and with higher fracture incidence in women". Those were some of the conclusions reached in the study by Karl Michaëlsson and colleagues [1] (open-access) looking at milk consumption and "mortality and fractures in women and men". The BBC among other media have covered the study (see here).Take me out tonightBased on quite a large participant group (two actually) who completed a food........ Read more »

Michaelsson, K., Wolk, A., Langenskiold, S., Basu, S., Warensjo Lemming, E., Melhus, H., & Byberg, L. (2014) Milk intake and risk of mortality and fractures in women and men: cohort studies. BMJ, 349(oct27 1). DOI: 10.1136/bmj.g6015  

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