Post List

Medicine posts

(Modify Search »)

  • December 31, 1969
  • 07:32 PM
  • 1,791 views

Experimental Biology Blogging: To a Bigger Heart and Back Again, characterization of cardiac remodeling in pregnancy.

by Scicurious in Neurotic Physiology

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States for both men and women, but in women in particular the disease often goes undetected. Finding ways to detect symptoms of heart disease in women can help us detect signs and risk factors early and help prevent deaths and increase the quality and [...]... Read more »

van Rooij, E., Sutherland, L., Liu, N., Williams, A., McAnally, J., Gerard, R., Richardson, J., & Olson, E. (2006) A signature pattern of stress-responsive microRNAs that can evoke cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 103(48), 18255-18260. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0608791103  

Malik FI, Hartman JJ, Elias KA, Morgan BP, Rodriguez H, Brejc K, Anderson RL, Sueoka SH, Lee KH, Finer JT.... (2011) Cardiac myosin activation: a potential therapeutic approach for systolic heart failure. Science (New York, N.Y.), 331(6023), 1439-43. PMID: 21415352  

  • December 31, 1969
  • 07:32 PM
  • 1,024 views

Comparing Apples with Oranges: B&W

by Peter Nollert in Emerald BioStructures Blog



Identifying individual amino acid residues within a GPCR and comparing these across different receptors is a routine task that’s helped by a widely accepted nomenclature system: that of Ballesteros and Weinstein.

Juan A. Ballesteros, Harel Weinstein (1995). Integrated methods for the construction of three-dimensional models and computational probing of structure-function relations in G protein-coupled receptors Methods in Neurosciences, 25, 366-428 DOI: 10.1016/S1043-9471(05)80049........ Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 3,283 views

Nicotine and the Humphrey Bogart Gene

by Dirk Hanson in Addiction Inbox

You can lead a fish to water, but can you make it smoke?

... Read more »

Petzold AM, Balciunas D, Sivasubbu S, Clark KJ, Bedell VM, Westcot SE, Myers SR, Moulder GL, Thomas MJ, & Ekker SC. (2009) Nicotine response genetics in the zebrafish. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 106(44), 18662-7. PMID: 19858493  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,668 views

New GPCR structure: CXCR4 Chemokine Receptor (HIV and cancer target)

by Peter Nollert in Protein Crystallization Blog

Congratulations to Ray Stevens and team to determining and publishing the crystallographic structure of the CXCR4 Chemokine receptor in Science. The diffenent binding areas for the small molecule and peptide antagonist are nicely resolved and show extensive interactions with binding pocket residues in the 2.5 – 3.1 A crystal structures.... Read more »

Wu B, Chien EY, Mol CD, Fenalti G, Liu W, Katritch V, Abagyan R, Brooun A, Wells P, Bi FC.... (2010) Structures of the CXCR4 chemokine GPCR with small-molecule and cyclic peptide antagonists. Science (New York, N.Y.), 330(6007), 1066-71. PMID: 20929726  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,405 views

New GPCR structure: CXCR4 Chemokine Receptor (HIV and cancer target)

by Peter Nollert in Emerald BioStructures Blog

Congratulations to Ray Stevens and team to determining and publishing the crystallographic structure of the CXCR4 Chemokine receptor in Science. The diffenent binding areas for the small molecule and peptide antagonist are nicely resolved and show extensive interactions with binding pocket residues in the 2.5 – 3.1 A crystal structures... Read more »

Wu B, Chien EY, Mol CD, Fenalti G, Liu W, Katritch V, Abagyan R, Brooun A, Wells P, Bi FC.... (2010) Structures of the CXCR4 chemokine GPCR with small-molecule and cyclic peptide antagonists. Science (New York, N.Y.), 330(6007), 1066-71. PMID: 20929726  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,570 views

Cellular Feast or Famine

by Sanford- Burnham in Beaker

Not all cholesterol is bad. Every cell requires it for growth – they either have to get cholesterol somewhere or they die. A sensor called sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2 (SREBP-2) monitors cellular cholesterol levels and responds to low levels by switching on genes that allow the cell to either 1) take up more from the bloodstream or 2) manufacture more from cholesterol building blocks inside the cell. Now researchers have uncovered a third cholesterol source also controlled b........ Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,956 views

HIV vaccine research: Protein which train B cells for production of antibodies against HIV which successfully neutralize HIV

by B V Waghmare in HIV virus and antiretroviral drugs and antiAIDS vaccine research and developmets

HIV virus rapidly undergoes mutation, which is main hurdle in developing vaccine against HIV.There is a region on HIV virus which shows less variations, called as Cd4 binding site ,therefore a protein which stimulate antibody formation against this region can be developed and used as a vaccine.
Researchers at Vaccine Research Center (VRC) and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), National Institutes of Health have studied genes which code for such proteins which can........ Read more »

B V Waghmare. (2011) HIV vaccine development : Proteins which trains B Cells for production of antibodies which successfully neutralize HIV by binding with it . http://bvwaghmare.blogspot.com. info:/(DOI/arXiv/etc.)

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,857 views

Using folate receptor alpha flurorescence imaging in ovarian cancer

by Sally Church in Pharma Strategy Blog

The idea behind this concept is that fluorescence technology can be used to help guide ovarian cancer surgery more effectively, since the tumors tend to be small and hard to see for surgeons performing the excision.... Read more »

van Dam, G., Themelis, G., Crane, L., Harlaar, N., Pleijhuis, R., Kelder, W., Sarantopoulos, A., de Jong, J., Arts, H., van der Zee, A.... (2011) Intraoperative tumor-specific fluorescence imaging in ovarian cancer by folate receptor-α targeting: first in-human results. Nature Medicine. DOI: 10.1038/nm.2472  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,903 views

2011: The Year in Drugs Deaths and data fraud

by Neurobonkers in Neurobonkers

A look at the biggest drugs news stories of the year and a statistical analysis of drugs deaths this year.... Read more »

Measham,F. Moore, K. Østergaard, J. (2011) Mephedrone, ‘‘Bubble’’ and unidentified white powders: the contested identities of synthetic ‘‘legal highs". DRUGS AND ALCOHOL TODAY, 137-146. info:/

Editorial team. (2010) The EMCDDA annual report 2010: the state of the drugs problem in Europe. The European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction, also published in Euro surveillance :European communicable disease bulletin, 15(46). PMID: 21144426  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,585 views

Copyright vs Medicine: If this topic isn’t covered in your newspaper this weekend, get a new newspaper

by Neurobonkers in Neurobonkers

After thirty years of silence, authors of a standard clinical psychiatric bedside test have issued take down orders of new medical research. Doctors who use copies of the bedside test which will have been printed in some of their oldest medical textbooks are liable to be sued for up to $150,000.... Read more »

Newman, J., & Feldman, R. (2011) Copyright and Open Access at the Bedside. New England Journal of Medicine, 365(26), 2447-2449. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMp1110652  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,674 views

Is this journal for real?

by Neurobonkers in Neurobonkers

This year 134 suspect new journals have appeared from the abyss, all published by the same clandestine company “Scientific & Academic Publishing, USA“... Read more »

Morrison, Heather. (2012) Scholarly Communication in Crisis. Freedom for scholarship in the internet age. Simon Fraser University School of Communication. info:/

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,404 views

Dizziness When Standing Up Linked to Greater Risk of Heart Failure: Research

by United Academics in United Academics

Many people feel suddenly dizzy when they stand up too quickly. This is caused by orthostatic hypotension, a rapid drop in blood pressure. Now a team of scientists at the University of North Carolina suggest that people with orthostatic hypotension might have a greater risk of developing heart failure.... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,400 views

The Aging Effects of the Sun Revealed on Trucker’s Face

by United Academics in United Academics

The man on the picture, William McElligott, spent 28 years of his life driving a delivery truck in Chicago. Only the left side of his face was exposed to the sun, with the result that it now looks much older than his right side. His case is a rare reminder of the aging effects of the sun, but also of the need to take precautions when working under certain conditions.... Read more »

Gordon, J., & Brieva, J. (2012) Unilateral Dermatoheliosis. New England Journal of Medicine, 366(16). DOI: 10.1056/NEJMicm1104059  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,924 views

Babies Are Healthier When There Is a Dog at Home: Research

by United Academics in United Academics

New research published in Pediatrics suggests that children living with a dog are significantly healthier than those living without it. The researchers followed up 397 Finnish children, asking their parents to fill in weekly questionnaires about their health until they were 1 year old. Scientists believe that this is so because dog contact helps the babies build up their immune system.... Read more »

Eija Bergroth, Sami Remes, Juha Pekkanen, Timo Kauppila, Gisela Büchele, & Leea Keski-Nisula. (2012) Respiratory Tract Illnesses During the First Year of Life: Effect of Dog and Cat Contacts. Pediatrics. info:/10.1542/peds.2011-2825

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,484 views

Testing Hair Can Detect Heart Disease

by Andrew Porterfield in United Academics

Usually, doctors take a blood test to determine levels of cortisol, a hormone that’s elevated by stress and is linked to a number of cardiovascular disorders. But a blood test just takes a cross-section “snapshot” of blood cortisol levels, and can’t tell how long these levels have been high.... Read more »

Manenschijn, L., Schaap, L., van Schoor, N., van der Pas, S., Peeters, G., Lips, P., Koper, J., & van Rossum, E. (2013) High Long-Term Cortisol Levels, Measured in Scalp Hair, Are Associated With a History of Cardiovascular Disease. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology , 98(5), 2078-2083. DOI: 10.1210/jc.2012-3663  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,257 views

I WILL FEAR NO EVIL: THE FIRST HEAD TRANSPLANT ON HUMAN

by Eugenio Maria Battaglia in Science to Grok

In 2008, doctor Sergio Canavero, an italian neurosurgeon based in Turin, IT, have awakened a 20 years old lady from a permanent post-traumatic vegetative state, by means of a bifocal extradural cortical electro-stimulation. Today, while Science still find it hard to explain consciousness and embodied cognition – the world-class neurosurgeon made a shock announcement: “I’m ready for the first head transplant on a man.”

In the manuscript published on Surgical Neurology I........ Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,576 views

Ibrutinib leads the race to CLL 17p deletion market

by Pieter Droppert in Biotech Strategy Blog

Earlier this month, Janssen/Pharmacyclics announced they had submitted a New Drug Application (NDA) for FDA approval of ibrutinib, an oral Bruton’s tyrosine kinase inhibitor (BTK) in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) for the treatment of patients with a deletion of the short arm of chromosome 17 (del17p).

The company have requested Priority review; approval later this year or in early 2014 is highly likely given that the agent also has Breakthrough designation status.

This is grea........ Read more »

Hartmut Döhner, M.D., Stephan Stilgenbauer, M.D., Axel Benner, M.Sc., Elke Leupolt, M.D., Alexander Kröber, M.D., Lars Bullinger, M.D., Konstanze Döhner, M.D., Martin Bentz, M.D., & Peter Lichter, Ph.D. (2000) Genomic Aberrations and Survival in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia. The New England Journal of Medicine, 1910-1916. info:/10.1056/NEJM200012283432602

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,252 views

Interlukin 32 biomarker which predict relapse of mycobacterium tuberculosis

by B V Waghmare in HIV virus and antiretroviral drugs and antiAIDS vaccine research and developmets

Interlukin 32 a protien which is found in people which do test positie for mycobacterium tuberculosis infection but do not develop pulmonary disease, it is found that interlukin is important in killing micobacterium, thereby protect them from TB disease, this interleukin 32 can be used therapeutically in patients suffering with TB along with chemotherapy, which will enhance efficacy of anti tuberculosis chemo therapy... Read more »

B V Waghmare. (2014) Interlukin 32 biomarker that will predict relapse of tuberculosis infection and will be used in treatment of TB. http://www.medicalwebsite.org/2014/09/protein-that-protect-from-tb-infection.html. info:/

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,427 views

...How to Fix Science

by Viputheshwar Sitaraman in Draw Science

(Part 2/2) However, we can fix science. [Infographic]... Read more »

Alberts, B., Kirschner, M., Tilghman, S., & Varmus, H. (2014) Rescuing US biomedical research from its systemic flaws. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 111(16), 5773-5777. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1404402111  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 386 views

H255Y and K508R missense mutations in FLCN promote kidney neoplasia

by Joana Guedes in BHD Research Blog

The germline FLCN missense mutations H255Y (Hasumi et al., 2009) and K508R (Toro et al., 2008) have been identified in patients with bilateral multifocal (BMF) kidney tumours and other clinical symptoms of Birt-Hogg-Dube (BHD) syndrome, or with BMF kidney tumours as the only manifestation. Building on their previous work identifying the H255Y mutation in human BHD kidney tumour, Hasumi et al. (2016) investigated whether these mutations have an impact on FLCN function. The authors evaluated the F........ Read more »

join us!

Do you write about peer-reviewed research in your blog? Use ResearchBlogging.org to make it easy for your readers — and others from around the world — to find your serious posts about academic research.

If you don't have a blog, you can still use our site to learn about fascinating developments in cutting-edge research from around the world.

Register Now

Research Blogging is powered by SRI Technology.

To learn more, visit http://selfregulationinstitute.org/.