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  • September 23, 2014
  • 01:55 PM
  • 3 views

Lie Detection using Brain Waves: It’s just as creepy as it sounds…

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Currently lie detectors (polygraphs) are not admissible in court, this is because (despite what you may read) there is little proof to show that they are much better than a guess — coming in at roughly 50% accuracy. They aren’t really based in science, making them more of a toy. There might just be a new contender in the lie detection department coming soon however, researchers have found that brain activity can be used to tell whether someone recognizes details they encountered in normal, d........ Read more »

  • September 21, 2014
  • 02:33 PM
  • 45 views

Move over Carbon nanotubes introducing Diamond nanothreads

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Carbon nanotubes, the wave of the future. Our hopes and dreams for the future have been firmly placed in using the unique material for everything from electronics to engineering. Unfortunately the production of carbon nanotubes has been hampered by setbacks, which as it turns out might not be a bad thing. This is because for the first time, scientists have discovered how to produce ultra-thin “diamond nanothreads” that promise extraordinary properties, including strength and stiffness greate........ Read more »

Fitzgibbons, T., Guthrie, M., Xu, E., Crespi, V., Davidowski, S., Cody, G., Alem, N., & Badding, J. (2014) Benzene-derived carbon nanothreads. Nature Materials. DOI: 10.1038/nmat4088  

  • September 19, 2014
  • 07:28 PM
  • 63 views

Nanosponges Clean up Antibody-mediated Autoimmune Disease

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

What does lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, type I diabetes, multiple sclerosis, and rheumatic heart disease have in common? All of these (and many other) apparently unrelated disorders are caused by autoimmunity, in which the immune system produces antibodies that attack normal, healthy cells and tissues. Currently considered incurable, these autoimmune diseases can be managed, but to varying degrees and not without serious side effects. Moreover, autoimmune diseases include a wide range of dysfunct........ Read more »

Copp JA, Fang RH, Luk BT, Hu CM, Gao W, Zhang K, & Zhang L. (2014) Clearance of pathological antibodies using biomimetic nanoparticles. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 111(37), 13481-6. PMID: 25197051  

  • September 19, 2014
  • 06:25 PM
  • 60 views

Estimating how much we don't know

by Iddo Friedberg in Byte Size Biology

Most of our understanding of what genes do comes from computational predictions, rather than actual experiments. For almost any given gene that is sequenced, its function is determined by putting its sequence through one or more function annotation algorithms. Computational annotation is cheaper and more feasible than cloning, translating, and assaying the gene product (typically a protein) to find out exactly what it does. Experiments can be long, expensive and, in many cases, impossible to pe........ Read more »

  • September 17, 2014
  • 01:24 PM
  • 72 views

Biofilms: Using Bacteria for new Designer Nanomaterials

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

For most people biofilms conjure up images of slippery stones in a streambed and dirty drains. While there are plenty of "bad" biofilms around – they are even the same stuff that causes pesky dental plaque and a host of other more serious medical problems – a team of researchers sees biofilms as a robust new platform for designer nanomaterials that could clean up polluted rivers, manufacture pharmaceutical products, fabricate new textiles, and more.... Read more »

Peter Q. Nguyen,, Zsofia Botyanszki,, Pei Kun R. Tay,, & Neel S. Joshi. (2014) Programmable biofilm-based materials from engineered curli nanofibres. Nature Communications. info:/10.1038/ncomms5945

  • September 14, 2014
  • 02:24 PM
  • 84 views

Biospleen Helps Clean Blood to Prevent Sepsis

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

When a patient has sepsis Things can go downhill fast. A life-threatening condition in which bacteria or fungi multiply in a patient's blood -- sepsis is often too fast for antibiotics to help. But that's all about to change with the introduction of a new device -- inspired by the human spleen -- that may radically transform the way doctors treat sepsis.... Read more »

Kang JH, Super M, Yung CW, Cooper RM, Domansky K, Graveline AR, Mammoto T, Berthet JB, Tobin H, Cartwright MJ.... (2014) An extracorporeal blood-cleansing device for sepsis therapy. Nature medicine. PMID: 25216635  

  • September 11, 2014
  • 11:00 PM
  • 100 views

Transcendental idealism and Post’s variant of the Church-Turing thesis

by Artem Kaznatcheev in Evolutionary Games Group

One of the exciting things in reading philosophy, its history in particular, is experiencing the tension between different schools of thought. This excitement turns to beauty if a clear synthesis emerges to reconcile the conflicting ideas. In the middle to late 18th century, as the Age of Enlightenment was giving way to the Romantic era, […]... Read more »

Post, E.L. (1936) Finite combinatory processes -- formulation 1. Journal of Symbolic Logic, 1(3), 103-105. info:/

  • September 10, 2014
  • 02:26 PM
  • 95 views

Multiple Sclerosis and Myelin loss

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system that disrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. The exact cause is unknown, however people with multiple sclerosis lose myelin in the gray matter of their brains and the loss is closely correlated with the severity of the disease, according to a new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study.... Read more »

Vasily L. Yarnykh, James D. Bowen, Alexey Samsonov, Pavle Repovic, Angeli Mayadev, Peiqing Qian, Beena Gangadharan, Bart P. Keogh, Kenneth R. Maravilla, & Lily K. Jung Henson. (2014) Fast Whole-Brain Three-dimensional Macromolecular Proton Fraction Mapping in Multiple Sclerosis. Radiological Society of North America . info:/10.1148/radiol.14140528

  • September 9, 2014
  • 06:03 AM
  • 88 views

Punning with the Pub in PubMed: Are there any decent NCBI puns left? #PubMedPuns

by Duncan Hull in O'Really?

Many people claim they get all their best ideas in the Pub, but for lots of scientists their best ideas probably come from PubMed.gov – the NCBI’s monster database of biomedical literature. Consequently, the database has spawned a whole slew of tools that riff off the PubMed name, many puns and portmanteaus (aka “PubManteaus”), the pub-based wordplays are very common. All of this might make you wonder, are there any decent PubMed puns left? Here’s an incomplete coll........ Read more »

Gibney Elizabeth. (2014) How to tame the flood of literature. Nature, 513(7516). PMID: 25186906  

Kumar Neeraj, Berg Alexander, Belhumeur Peter N, & Nayar Shree. (2011) Describable Visual Attributes for Face Verification and Image Search. IEEE transactions on pattern analysis and machine intelligence. PMID: 21383395  

McEntyre Johanna R, Ananiadou Sophia, Andrews Stephen, Black William J, Boulderstone Richard, Buttery Paula, Chaplin David, Chevuru Sandeepreddy, Cobley Norman, & Coleman Lee-Ann. (2010) UKPMC: a full text article resource for the life sciences. Nucleic acids research. PMID: 21062818  

  • September 6, 2014
  • 06:22 PM
  • 116 views

Is the Internet of Things the Real Thing?

by Aurametrix team in Health Technologies

The Internet of Things: an exciting new world with a digital nervous system or a nightmare where objects take decisions while we are unconscious?15 years ago, when the term was first coined, it was about assigning everything around us a unique identity with RFID tags, to enable all material things to talk to each other and save us time for gathering and using information. As RFID tags dropped below 1 cent cost, and sensors, modems and devices are getting smaller, smarter and cheaper, this vision........ Read more »

Ashton K. (2009) That 'Internet of Things' Thing, in the real world things matter more than ideas. RFID Journal. info:/

Schreier G. (2014) The internet of things for personalized health. Studies in health technology and informatics, 22-31. PMID: 24851958  

Perera, C., Zaslavsky, A., Christen, P., & Georgakopoulos, D. (2014) Sensing as a service model for smart cities supported by Internet of Things. Transactions on Emerging Telecommunications Technologies, 25(1), 81-93. DOI: 10.1002/ett.2704  

  • September 1, 2014
  • 11:15 PM
  • 113 views

Falsifiability and Gandy’s variant of the Church-Turing thesis

by Artem Kaznatcheev in Evolutionary Games Group

In 1936, two years after Karl Popper published the first German version of The Logic of Scientific Discovery and introduced falsifiability; Alonzo Church, Alan Turing, and Emil Post each published independent papers on the Entscheidungsproblem and introducing the lambda calculus, Turing machines, and Post-Turing machines as mathematical models of computation. The years after saw many […]... Read more »

Gandy, R. (1980) Church's thesis and principles for mechanisms. Studies in Logic and the Foundations of Mathematics, 123-148. DOI: 10.1016/S0049-237X(08)71257-6  

  • August 30, 2014
  • 02:54 PM
  • 145 views

Direct mind-to-mind communication in humans

by Shelly Fan in Neurorexia

Image credit: www.techspot.com Here’s something right out of science fiction: a team of neuroscientists in Spain developed a system that allows a person to transmit the...... Read more »

Grau C, Ginhoux R, Riera A, Nguyen TL, Chauvat H, Berg M, Amengual JL, Pascual-Leone A, & Ruffini G. (2014) Conscious Brain-to-Brain Communication in Humans Using Non-Invasive Technologies. PloS one, 9(8). PMID: 25137064  

  • August 28, 2014
  • 04:53 PM
  • 212 views

This is your Brain. This is your Brain on Drugs

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Drugs are bad for the brain. That is (excuse the horrible pun) a no-brainer, but while scientists have seen the after effect drugs have on the brain, we have never seen how they affect the blood flow to the brain. That is of course, until now. A new method for measuring and imaging how quickly blood flows in the brain could help doctors and researchers better understand how drug abuse affects the brain and they are currently testing this new method as we speak.... Read more »

  • August 27, 2014
  • 03:23 PM
  • 154 views

The Learning Brain Unravelled

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

As an engineer you would think math would come easy to me, it didn’t. Funny thing though, science in general and biology in particular came very easy to me. The big question is why? Why would math, something I need to know how to do for my work and my degree, be so hard to learn? Thankfully science has stepped in to answer the question, at least partially, about why somethings can come so easy to a person and other things (like me and math) take so much longer to pick up.[…]... Read more »

Patrick T. Sadtler,, Kristin M. Quick,, Matthew D. Golub,, Steven M. Chase,, Stephen I. Ryu,, Elizabeth C. Tyler-Kabara,, Byron M. Yu,, & Aaron P. Batista. (2014) Neural constraints on learning. Nature. info:/10.1038/nature13665

  • August 27, 2014
  • 09:46 AM
  • 134 views

Fluid-injection could act as 'trigger' for large earthquakes

by This Science is Crazy! in This Science Is Crazy!

New study investigates whether fluid-injection techniques (such as fracking, solution mining and enhanced geothermal)can generate enough stress to set off large quakes prematurely... Read more »

Mulargia, F., & Bizzarri, A. (2014) Anthropogenic Triggering of Large Earthquakes. Scientific Reports, 6100. DOI: 10.1038/srep06100  

  • August 26, 2014
  • 01:27 PM
  • 157 views

The Holographic Universe [we might Live in!]

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Are you feeling a little… flat? Well that might be because you are only in 2 dimensions. I know what you’re thinking, insane! Well first check the name of the business and second, check out the science. In fact, it may seem like a joke, but the math suggests that it could very well be true and with it could come a deeper understanding of the universe. Testing this hypothesis (which was first made in the late 90’s) has been harder to do than you might think, but that has now changed. We are........ Read more »

  • August 23, 2014
  • 01:30 PM
  • 131 views

An end to Finger Pricking for Diabetics

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

About 10% of the US is diabetic, that doesn’t sound like a lot until you realize how many people there are in the US (roughly 311 million and counting). Think about it like this, every 7 seconds (roughly) a child is born. With that statistic every minute and 10 seconds leads to another person with diabetes. By the time you finish reading this, about two people in the US will be diagnosed with diabetes.[…]... Read more »

Liakat S, Bors KA, Xu L, Woods CM, Doyle J, & Gmachl CF. (2014) Noninvasive in vivo glucose sensing on human subjects using mid-infrared light. Biomedical optics express, 5(7), 2397-404. PMID: 25071973  

  • August 21, 2014
  • 08:03 AM
  • 115 views

Payment System Protects Privacy of EV Owners

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

A new electronic payment system created at A*STAR aims to protect the privacy of EV owners recharging their electric cars.... Read more »

Au, M., Liu, J., Fang, J., Jiang, Z., Susilo, W., & Zhou, J. (2014) A New Payment System for Enhancing Location Privacy of Electric Vehicles. IEEE Transactions on Vehicular Technology, 63(1), 3-18. DOI: 10.1109/TVT.2013.2274288  

  • August 20, 2014
  • 03:41 PM
  • 127 views

Cool Burning Flames Could Lead to Better Engines

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

A team of international researchers has discovered a new type of cool burning flames that could lead to greener, more efficient combustion engines.... Read more »

Dietrich, D., Nayagam, V., Hicks, M., Ferkul, P., Dryer, F., Farouk, T., Shaw, B., Suh, H., Choi, M., Liu, Y.... (2014) Droplet Combustion Experiments Aboard the International Space Station. Microgravity Science and Technology. DOI: 10.1007/s12217-014-9372-2  

  • August 18, 2014
  • 01:21 PM
  • 161 views

We can Build it Better: The First Artificial Cell Network

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

How does the old saying go? Imitation, is the sincerest form of flattery? Well that is what we’ve been trying to do for a very long time, but mimicking the intricate networks and dynamic interactions that are inherent to living cells is difficult to achieve outside the cell. Unfortunately despite all our intelligence nature has had the upper hand on us for a long time. That has not changed… until now that is.[…]... Read more »

Karzbrun E, Tayar AM, Noireaux V, & Bar-Ziv RH. (2014) Programmable on-chip DNA compartments as artificial cells. Science (New York, N.Y.), 345(6198), 829-32. PMID: 25124443  

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