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  • May 8, 2017
  • 05:45 PM
  • 207 views

Let those who never smelled bad cast the first stone

by Aurametrix team in Aurametrix Blog

Analysis of our metabolism is crucial to comprehending the responses of our genes and microbes to the stresses of daily life, and to elucidating the causes and consequences of health and disease. And measurement of urinary metabolites - small molecules produced from foods, drinks, drugs, environmental contaminants, bodily waste products and bacterial by-products - is key to the analysis. We applied this approach to an elusive condition that has always evaded diagnosis: s........ Read more »

Bouatra, S., Aziat, F., Mandal, R., Guo, A., Wilson, M., Knox, C., Bjorndahl, T., Krishnamurthy, R., Saleem, F., Liu, P.... (2013) The Human Urine Metabolome. PLoS ONE, 8(9). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0073076  

Irene S. Gabashvili. (2017) Raw Data from Clinical Trial NCT02692495. Mendeley Data. info:/DOI: 10.17632/8bk6h6bmkr.1

  • May 1, 2017
  • 06:30 PM
  • 234 views

Sharing the Future with Artificial Intelligence

by Aurametrix team in Aurametrix Blog

Artificial intelligence has reached a buzzword utopia as it seems everyone is talking about self-driving cars, delivery drones and virtual assistants with human-like "intelligence." Some believe this new era of AI will make the American Dream universally accessible, enabling early retirement in bucolic settings. Others are concerned about a greater inequality created by a jobless future.... Read more »

  • January 30, 2016
  • 10:00 PM
  • 867 views

Go for it

by Paco Jariego in Mind the Post

Go was considered one of the “grand challenges” in AI research, and the last stronghold of human superiority on board games. Cracking Go is a feat previously thought to be at least a decade away, and it gives credence to the idea that true, general-purpose, strong artificial intelligence may be possible.... Read more »

Silver D, Huang A, Maddison CJ, Guez A, Sifre L, van den Driessche G, Schrittwieser J, Antonoglou I, Panneershelvam V, Lanctot M.... (2016) Mastering the game of Go with deep neural networks and tree search. Nature, 529(7587), 484-9. PMID: 26819042  

Searle, J. (2010) Minds, brains, and programs. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 3(03), 417. DOI: 10.1017/S0140525X00005756  

  • May 8, 2015
  • 09:30 AM
  • 1,066 views

do memristor chips remember electric sheep?

by Greg Fish in weird things

Humans beware. Our would-be cybernetic overlords made a leap towards hyper-intelligence in the last few months as artificial neural networks can now be trained on specialized chips which use memristors, an electrical component that can remember the flow of electricity through it to help manage the amount of current required in a circuit. Using these specialized chips, robots, supercomputers, and sensors could solve complex real world problems faster, easier, and with far less energy. [...] ...... Read more »

  • March 3, 2014
  • 12:04 AM
  • 1,365 views

Influence of Temperature on Calcium Carbonate Polymorph formed from Ammonium Carbonate and Calcium Acetate

by JNSM in JScholar Publishers

This research used ammonium carbonate and calcium acetate in the preparation of various calcium carbonate polymorphs for biomimetic composite applications. Biominerals were synthesized at temperatures ranging from 25 to 80 °C to investigate the effect of synthesis temperature on the abundance of vaterite, aragonite, and calcite, delineating regions that are favorable for the formation of these different calcium carbonate polymorphs... Read more »

Philip G Malone, Kevin Torres-Cancel, Robert D Moser, Allison PG, Rae Gore E, Mei Q Chandler, Charles A Weiss, Jr.*. (2014) Influence of Temperature on Calcium Carbonate Polymorph formed from Ammonium Carbonate and Calcium Acetate. Journal of Nanotechnology and Smart Materials, 1(1), 1-6. info:/1: 105

  • February 20, 2014
  • 10:17 PM
  • 1,306 views

Smart Materials from Nanotechnology for Global Challenges

by JNSM in JScholar Publishers

There are several open challenges that our society has to address in the near future: produce sufficient amounts of clean energy from renewable sources, design new technologies that enable a sustainable economic growth, address some relevant environmental issues like quality of air and water or waste recycling, improve our standard of life via more accurate diagnostic tools and new medical treatments, just to mention a few. Most of these challenges deal with the design, synthesis, characterizati........ Read more »

Gianfranco Pacchioni. (2014) Smart Materials from Nanotechnology for Global Challenges. Journal of Nanotechnology and Smart Materials, 1(1), 1-1. info:/1: 101

  • February 14, 2014
  • 11:45 PM
  • 1,594 views

Evolution is a special kind of (machine) learning

by Artem Kaznatcheev in Evolutionary Games Group

Theoretical computer science has a long history of peering through the algorithmic lens at the brain, mind, and learning. In fact, I would argue that the field was born from the epistemological questions of what can our minds learn of mathematical truth through formal proofs. The perspective became more scientific with McCullock & Pitts’ (1943) […]... Read more »

Valiant, L.G. (2009) Evolvability. Journal of the ACM, 56(1), 3. DOI: 10.1145/1462153.1462156  

  • October 4, 2013
  • 08:13 AM
  • 1,854 views

Why PLOS ONE is no longer my default journal

by Juan Nunez-Iglesias in I Love Symposia!

Time-to-publication at the world’s biggest scientific journal has grown dramatically, but the nail in the coffin was its poor production policies. When PLOS ONE was announced in 2006, its charter immediately resonated with me. This would be the first journal where only scientific accuracy mattered. Judgments of “impact” and “interest” would be left to posterity, […]... Read more »

  • September 24, 2013
  • 09:30 PM
  • 1,248 views

How teachers help us learn deterministic finite automata

by Artem Kaznatcheev in Evolutionary Games Group

Many graduate students, and even professors, have a strong aversion to teaching. This tends to produce awful, one-sided classes that students attend just to transcribe the instructor’s lecture notes. The trend is so bad that in some cases instructors take pride in their bad teaching, and at some institutions — or so I hear around […]... Read more »

  • September 6, 2013
  • 02:44 PM
  • 1,441 views

Can DNA Template Lead to Future Technologies?

by Jason Carr in Wired Cosmos

DNA is the blueprint for life. Could it also become the template for making a new generation of computer chips based not on silicon, but on an experimental material known as graphene? That’s the theory behind a process that Stanford chemical engineering professor Zhenan Bao reveals in Nature Communications (citation below). Bao and her co-authors, former post-doctoral fellows Anatoliy Sokolov … Read More →... Read more »

A.N. Sokolov, F. L. Yap, N. Liu, K. Kim, L. Ci, O. B. Johnson, H. Wang, M. Vosgueritchian, A. L. Koh, J Chen, J. Park.... (2013) Direct growth of aligned graphitic nanoribbons from a DNA template by chemical vapour deposition. Nature Communications. DOI: 10.1038/ncomms3402  

  • July 3, 2013
  • 11:18 AM
  • 1,513 views

New Knowledge About Early Galaxies

by Jason Carr in Wired Cosmos

The early galaxies of the universe were very different from today’s galaxies. Using new detailed studies carried out with the ESO Very Large Telescope and the Hubble Space Telescope, researchers, including members from the Niels Bohr Institute, have studied an early galaxy in unprecedented detail and determined a number of important properties such as size, … Read More →... Read more »

Jens-Kristian Krogager, Johan P. U. Fynbo, Cédric Ledoux2, Lise Christensen, Anna Gallazzi, Peter Laursen, Palle Møller, Pasquier Noterdaeme, Céline Péroux, Max Pettini.... (2013) Comprehensive study of a z . Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 433(1). info:/10.1093/mnras/stt955

  • July 2, 2013
  • 12:00 PM
  • 735 views

Super Intelligent Machines Aren’t to Be Feared

by Tony Prescott. in United Academics

Fear of machines becoming smarter than humans is a standard part of popular culture. In films like iRobot and Terminator, humans are usurped. Throughout history we can trace stories about humankind overreaching through a desire to understand and copy ourselves, from Ancient Greek mythology to Milton’s Paradise Lost and Shelley’s Frankenstein. Today’s Prometheans are supposedly scientists working on artificial intelligence (AI), who run the risk of creating machines intelligent ........ Read more »

  • May 23, 2013
  • 03:37 PM
  • 1,312 views

Researchers Turn a Smartphone into a Biosensor

by Jason Carr in Wired Cosmos

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign researchers have developed a cradle and app for the iPhone that uses the phone’s built-in camera and processing power as a biosensor to detect toxins, proteins, bacteria, viruses and other molecules. Having such sensitive biosensing capabilities in the field could enable on-the-spot tracking of groundwater contamination, combine the phone’s GPS … Read More →... Read more »

Gallegos, D., Long, K., Yu, H., Clark, P., Lin, Y., George, S., Nath, P., & Cunningham, B. (2013) Label-free biodetection using a smartphone. Lab on a Chip, 13(11), 2124. DOI: 10.1039/C3LC40991K  

  • May 18, 2013
  • 07:00 AM
  • 1,749 views

Bigger groups make better decisions

by Randy Olson in Randal S. Olson's Blog

Randy Olson reviews a research paper that shows us how bigger groups can make more accurate decisions.... Read more »

  • May 13, 2013
  • 09:58 AM
  • 1,540 views

Riding Hexapod Walkers on Dusty Alien Worlds

by Jason Carr in Wired Cosmos

Speculative fiction is the home of countless machines that fly in space, yet resemble humanoid lifeforms. Scientists are now working on the next generation of robots that will blaze a trail in space by going where humans simply can’t maneuver on their own. Like so many things in the field of space exploration, the descendents … Read More →... Read more »

  • April 20, 2013
  • 04:00 AM
  • 727 views

Will the droids take academic jobs?

by Artem Kaznatcheev in Evolutionary Games Group

As a researcher, one of the biggest challenges I face is keeping up with the scientific literature. This is further exasperated by working in several disciplines, and without a more senior advisor or formal training in most of them. The Evolutionary Game Theory Reading Group, and later this blog, started as an attempt to help [...]... Read more »

  • March 11, 2013
  • 02:04 PM
  • 1,535 views

Let’s Explore Quantum Computing

by Jason Carr in Wired Cosmos

It’s fairly easy to surmise how quantum computing will evolve in the future if/when it becomes a reality. Devices that are currently based around a system of electronic circuits would eventually die off. Quantum devices would ultimately become the new standard in computing. While Peter Shor’s research showed how quantum algorithms would speed up advanced [...]... Read more »

Benningshof OW, Mohebbi HR, Taminiau IA, Miao GX, & Cory DG. (2013) Superconducting microstrip resonator for pulsed ESR of thin films. Journal of magnetic resonance (San Diego, Calif. : 1997), 84-87. PMID: 23454577  

Petersson KD, McFaul LW, Schroer MD, Jung M, Taylor JM, Houck AA, & Petta JR. (2012) Circuit quantum electrodynamics with a spin qubit. Nature, 490(7420), 380-3. PMID: 23075988  

  • March 7, 2013
  • 06:30 AM
  • 913 views

Games, culture, and the Turing test (Part I)

by Artem Kaznatcheev in Evolutionary Games Group

Intelligence is one of the most loaded terms that I encounter. A common association is the popular psychometric definition — IQ. For many psychologists, this definition is too restrictive and the g factor is preferred for getting at the ‘core’ of intelligence tests. Even geneticists have latched on to g for looking at heritability of [...]... Read more »

Strannegård, C., Amirghasemi, M., & Ulfsbäcker, S. (2013) An anthropomorphic method for number sequence problems. Cognitive Systems Research, 27-34. DOI: 10.1016/j.cogsys.2012.05.003  

  • March 6, 2013
  • 10:03 AM
  • 1,541 views

Dead Sparrow Turned into Robot to Study Bird Behavior

by Jason Carr in Wired Cosmos

Researchers at Duke University recently took a major step toward better understanding how swamp sparrows use a combination of song and visual displays to communicate with one another. How they came about making this discovery, though, is what makes this story particularly newsworthy — they stuffed a deceased swamp sparrow with a miniature computer and some [...]... Read more »

  • March 4, 2013
  • 01:50 PM
  • 1,424 views

Distributed control of uncertain systems using superpositions of linear operators - Likelihood calculus paper series review part 3

by Travis DeWolf in studywolf

The third (and final, at the moment) paper in the likelihood calculus series from Dr. Terrence Sanger is Distributed control of uncertain systems using superpositions of linear operators. Carrying the torch for the series right along, here Dr. Sanger continues investigating the development of an effective, general method of controlling systems operating under uncertainty. This is the paper that delivers on all the promises of building a controller out of a system described by the stochastic diff........ Read more »

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