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  • May 8, 2017
  • 05:45 PM
  • 202 views

Let those who never smelled bad cast the first stone

by Aurametrix team in Aurametrix Blog

Analysis of our metabolism is crucial to comprehending the responses of our genes and microbes to the stresses of daily life, and to elucidating the causes and consequences of health and disease. And measurement of urinary metabolites - small molecules produced from foods, drinks, drugs, environmental contaminants, bodily waste products and bacterial by-products - is key to the analysis. We applied this approach to an elusive condition that has always evaded diagnosis: s........ Read more »

Bouatra, S., Aziat, F., Mandal, R., Guo, A., Wilson, M., Knox, C., Bjorndahl, T., Krishnamurthy, R., Saleem, F., Liu, P.... (2013) The Human Urine Metabolome. PLoS ONE, 8(9). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0073076  

Irene S. Gabashvili. (2017) Raw Data from Clinical Trial NCT02692495. Mendeley Data. info:/DOI: 10.17632/8bk6h6bmkr.1

  • March 31, 2017
  • 07:00 AM
  • 237 views

Friday Fellow: Mexican Giant Horsetail

by Piter Boll in Earthling Nature

by Piter Kehoma Boll If you are walking through the forest of Central America, you may end up finding something that at first you could think is a group of bamboos, plants growing as a cylindrical segmented stem that can … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • February 3, 2017
  • 11:22 AM
  • 212 views

Brain Shape and Personality Type

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Personality has often been conceptualized a a human feature shaped largely by nurture and environment.Unlike major neuroscience medicine disorders, personality features have been considered less influenced by brain structure and genetic influences.A recent brain structure (morphology) study puts these assumptions at risk.Roberta Riccelli along with colleagues in Italy and Florida State University studied brain structural features across 507 participants in the Human Connectome Project.All subjec........ Read more »

  • December 21, 2016
  • 04:30 AM
  • 454 views

Colder May Not Be Cool for Recovery

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

After exercise, cold water immersion at 15°C may offer some improvements in recovery based on performance of a jump task and possibly markers of muscle damage. A colder temperature may not be as effective as cool water, so controlling the treatment parameters based on evidence is important.... Read more »

Vieira, A., Siqueira, A., Ferreira-Junior, J., do Carmo, J., Durigan, J., Blazevich, A., & Bottaro, M. (2016) The Effect of Water Temperature during Cold-Water Immersion on Recovery from Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage. International Journal of Sports Medicine, 37(12), 937-943. DOI: 10.1055/s-0042-111438  

  • December 6, 2016
  • 12:07 PM
  • 518 views

Online Insomnia Therapy Effective in Clinical Trial

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Insomnia of sufficient severity to meet clinical significance is estimated to affect up to 20% of the general population.This makes insomnia an important public health challenge.Effective, inexpensive and accessible programs to treat insomnia are needed.One recent controlled clinical trial supports the promise of an online intervention that incorporates key elements of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT).Lee Ritterband and colleagues at the University of Virginia recently published a controlled c........ Read more »

  • October 24, 2016
  • 11:19 AM
  • 546 views

Exercise After Study Boosts Memory

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

There is significant interest in activities that may boost academic achievement in the classroom.I previously posted on evidence that exercise prior to a learning task improved reading comprehension scores.You can access that post by clicking HERE.Now a study has compared two types of activities after a memorization task in male students.In this study, 60 male students completed a learning task and then were randomized into one of three activities for one hour. The three activities were playing ........ Read more »

  • October 21, 2016
  • 05:00 AM
  • 383 views

Friday Fellow: Witch’s Butter

by Piter Boll in Earthling Nature

by Piter Kehoma Boll Last week I introduced a cyanobacteria that reminds me of my childhood and that is commonly known as witch’s jelly or witch’s butter. But witch’s butter is also the common name of fungus, so I thought … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • August 21, 2016
  • 03:00 AM
  • 691 views

Brawn, Brain and Beauty

by Aurametrix team in Aurametrix Blog

In the future all humans will be tall and beautiful look-alikes, as in GATTACA. Or they will split into frail beauties and sturdy beasts, as described in H. G. Wells' The Time Machine. British evolutionary psychologist Oliver Curry and paleoanthropologist Matthew Skinner believe in the possibility of similar scenarios, based on either the rich and poor divide ("gracile" vs "robust" species) or climate change-related evolution (pale hairy giants vs aquatic and space humans). The change may b........ Read more »

Crabtree, G. (2013) Our fragile intellect. Part II. Trends in Genetics, 29(1), 3-5. DOI: 10.1016/j.tig.2012.10.003  

Dickenson, E., O'Connor, P., Robinson, P., Campbell, R., Ahmed, I., Fernandez, M., Hawkes, R., Charles, H., & Griffin, D. (2016) Hip morphology in elite golfers: asymmetry between lead and trail hips. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 50(17), 1081-1086. DOI: 10.1136/bjsports-2016-096007  

  • August 18, 2016
  • 08:00 AM
  • 680 views

Sorry, I Don't Drink

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

Koalas don’t drink a lot of water, but the spinifex hopping mouse and kangaroo rat put him to shame. They never drink. What water they need they get from the seeds they eat and from the fact that they conserve water amazingly well – including the water that they produce during metabolism. Adult mayflies don’t drink either – they don’t have working mouthparts! Of course, some only live a few minutes as adults, so it may not be that big a deal.... Read more »

  • July 29, 2016
  • 11:22 AM
  • 702 views

Elite Cyclists and Brain Fatigue Resistance

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

In a Brain Post from 2012 I reviewed a study of fatigue in elite athletic performance. This study supported a key role in the brain insula in regulating the perception of exercise-induced fatigue. You can access this post by clicking HERE.An update on this topic was recently published in PloS One by a research team in Australia.This study compared performance on a cognitive task after extreme 20 minute cycling time trial. Professional cyclists were compared to recreational cyclists on the Stroop........ Read more »

Martin K, Staiano W, Menasp√† P, Hennessey T, Marcora S, Keegan R, Thompson KG, Martin D, Halson S, & Rattray B. (2016) Superior Inhibitory Control and Resistance to Mental Fatigue in Professional Road Cyclists. PloS one, 11(7). PMID: 27441380  

  • July 18, 2016
  • 07:26 AM
  • 645 views

The Internet asks me about smelly things

by Rosin Cerate in Rosin Cerate

Whenever I'm working on a new post, I like to take a bit of time to check in on the stats for this blog. I'm particularly interested in what people are typing into their search engines to find their way here. For whatever reason, a post I wrote about what poisons smell like is very popular among users of the Internet. I'm taking this as a sign that people like to read about smells, so I thought I'd look into a couple of odour-related search queries via which people have found this blog.'type of ........ Read more »

Sell CS. (2006) On the unpredictability of odor. Angewandte Chemie (International ed. in English), 45(38), 6254-6261. PMID: 16983730  

  • June 1, 2016
  • 02:43 AM
  • 563 views

Organ regeneration in the lab

by jens wilkinson in It Ain't Magic

Interview with Takashi Tsuji, team leader of the Laboratory for Organ Regeneration at the RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology... Read more »

Takagi, R., Ishimaru, J., Sugawara, A., Toyoshima, K., Ishida, K., Ogawa, M., Sakakibara, K., Asakawa, K., Kashiwakura, A., Oshima, M.... (2016) Bioengineering a 3D integumentary organ system from iPS cells using an in vivo transplantation model. Science Advances, 2(4). DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1500887  

  • May 5, 2016
  • 02:26 PM
  • 647 views

Ketamine Metabolite Linked to Rapid Antidepressant Effect

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Model of crytalized ketamine moleculeStandard antidepressant therapies typically take two weeks or more to begin to act.Ketamine is an anesthetic drug recently demonstrated to have a rapid antidepressant effect.The mechanism for this effect is unknown. A recent mouse study of ketamine and metabolites of ketamine show some potentially groundbreaking insight for the treatment of depression.This study found these significant findings:Ketamine like most organic compounds is made of boty an R an........ Read more »

Zanos, P., Moaddel, R., Morris, P., Georgiou, P., Fischell, J., Elmer, G., Alkondon, M., Yuan, P., Pribut, H., Singh, N.... (2016) NMDAR inhibition-independent antidepressant actions of ketamine metabolites. Nature. DOI: 10.1038/nature17998  

  • April 27, 2016
  • 08:35 AM
  • 942 views

Your Body Has A Photographic Memory

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

For the first time anywhere - an easy explanation of your immune system in 1500 words! For the low, low price of zero dollars you can find out how your body protects you better the second time you are exposed to a disease. Special bonus offer – we’ll throw in how vaccines work and why you need one every year for the flu, although your old flu vaccines might still be helping you. ... Read more »

  • January 5, 2016
  • 07:00 PM
  • 905 views

Too hot to handle: investigating birds’ heat tolerance sheds light on their ability to adapt to climate change

by Betty Zou in Eat, Read, Science

Researchers at the University of New Mexico and University of Massachusetts Amherst are undertaking the "Hot Birds" project to complete a global survey of the heat tolerance of bird species living in extremely hot areas. The first paper to come out of those studies looks at doves and quails in the Sonoran Desert in Arizona with different strategies for staying cool.... Read more »

  • December 21, 2015
  • 10:59 PM
  • 795 views

Musculin: A Muscle Produced Peptide That Promotes Physical Endurance

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Ekaterina Subbotina, Ph.D. Postdoctoral Research Scholar University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine Iowa City, IA 52242¬† Medical Research: What is the background for this study? Dr. Subbotina: Exercises represent the most natural and effective way to … Continue reading →
The post Musculin: A Muscle Produced Peptide That Promotes Physical Endurance appeared first on MedicalResearch.com.
... Read more »

Ekaterina Subbotina, Ph.D. (2015) Musculin: A Muscle Produced Peptide That Promotes Physical Endurance. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • November 23, 2015
  • 12:06 PM
  • 875 views

Gambling and Brain Frontal-Striatum Connections

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

For the remainder of 2015, Brain Posts will focus on pathological gambling and also highlight the top-viewed posts for the year.Functional connectivity is a relatively recent brain imaging technique that provides a new look at brain circuitry at rest and with tasks.Resting state connectivity using fMRI provides a snapshot of brain connections in each individual. There is increasing study of resting connectivity in individuals with disorders in neuroscience medicine compared to control population........ Read more »

  • November 18, 2015
  • 07:04 AM
  • 1,448 views

Give Thanks For The Cranberry

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

Here comes Thanksgiving! The cranberry is an amazing fruit on its own for several reasons. Its cultivation and botany are unusual, as is its seed dispersal mechanism and structure. However, a major push has been on to understand the medicinal uses of the cranberry. Much debate is taking place as to the usefulness of cranberry compounds, anthocyanidins and polyphenols, in the prevention of urinary tract infections. Cranberry is even having some success in type II diabetes and as an anti-viral age........ Read more »

Ruel G, Lapointe A, Pomerleau S, Couture P, Lemieux S, Lamarche B, & Couillard C. (2013) Evidence that cranberry juice may improve augmentation index in overweight men. Nutrition research (New York, N.Y.), 33(1), 41-9. PMID: 23351409  

Shidfar F, Heydari I, Hajimiresmaiel SJ, Hosseini S, Shidfar S, & Amiri F. (2012) The effects of cranberry juice on serum glucose, apoB, apoA-I, Lp(a), and Paraoxonase-1 activity in type 2 diabetic male patients. Journal of research in medical sciences : the official journal of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, 17(4), 355-60. PMID: 23267397  

  • November 11, 2015
  • 08:40 AM
  • 976 views

Where Do All Those Leaves Come From?!

by Mark Lasbury in The 'Scope

As you grab your rake or leaf-blower this fall, you might wonder how it is possible for trees to make so many leaves. Learn where they all came from.... Read more »

Pijpers, J., Winkler, M., Surendranath, Y., Buonassisi, T., & Nocera, D. (2011) Light-induced water oxidation at silicon electrodes functionalized with a cobalt oxygen-evolving catalyst. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 108(25), 10056-10061. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1106545108  

  • October 21, 2015
  • 08:30 AM
  • 1,202 views

Mostly Dead Is Slightly Alive

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

Halloween brings stories of the undead, the dead coming back to life, and the dead staying dead but still coming to visit you. But the scariest of all is the prospect of being buried alive. It happened all to often in the most recent three centuries, so people devised some amazing precautions to prevent premature burial. Nowadays it’s less likely to happen, but there are several conditions that can mimic death and could lead to fingernail scratches inside the lid of a casket.... Read more »

Christopher Dibble. (2010) The Dead Ringer: Medicine, Poe, and the fear of premature burial. Historia Medicinae. info:/

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