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All posts; Tags Include "Sensation and Perception"

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  • December 12, 2016
  • 10:43 AM
  • 459 views

Simple Jury Persuasion: Why you don’t want your  trial videos to elicit awe from jurors 

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

While you don’t want jurors to think your visual evidence was made by poorly trained technicians—here’s a study that tells us something counter-intuitive that you may find useful (we have). It may not make obvious sense, but you also don’t want jurors to be blown away (i.e., awed, in wonder, overwhelmed by the majesty of […]

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Simple Jury Persuasion: Educating jurors about science may have no effect
Simple Jury Persuasion: Telling jurors where to look
Simple Jury Pe........ Read more »

Farias M, Newheiser AK, Kahane G, & de Toledo Z. (2013) Scientific faith: Belief in science increases in the face of stress and existential anxiety. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 49(6), 1210-1213. PMID: 24187384  

  • December 2, 2016
  • 07:02 AM
  • 282 views

Should I trust you? Let me see your face… 

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

If you try to identify what it is that makes someone trustworthy, you might list their forthrightness, values consistent with your own, or even their willingness to embrace unpopular positions. And that is all well and good but it likely is untrue. Instead, researchers tell us, we draw “relatively stable trustworthinesss impressions from facial appearance”. […]

Related posts:
Your face can get you killed… 
Never trust a man with a wide face
You can tell a lot from looking at some........ Read more »

Klapper, A., Dotsch, R., van Rooij, I., & Wigboldus, D. (2016) Do we spontaneously form stable trustworthiness impressions from facial appearance?. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 111(5), 655-664. DOI: 10.1037/pspa0000062  

  • November 28, 2016
  • 07:02 AM
  • 369 views

It’s late in 2016 and we still neither like nor trust atheists

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

We’ve written about atheists here (and how unpopular they are in North America) a number of times. The first time was in 2010 when we wrote an article in The Jury Expert because we were so taken aback by the level of vitriol we’d seen in a blog post describing a new research article on […]

Related posts:
Everything you ever wanted to know about atheists  (the 2016 update)
An update on disrupting suspicion of atheists
Everyone knows you just can’t trust an atheist!


... Read more »

  • November 16, 2016
  • 07:02 AM
  • 306 views

Beards, designing in discrimination, assertion for women, and the exhausting process of helping  

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

You are not seeing double. Over the last month we’ve kept reading and reading and reading but many of the articles we read for the blog were fun but just not substantive enough for a full blog post. So. Think of this as the director’s cut version of the blog—full of things you wish we’d […]

Related posts:
Science knowledge, objectifying women, earning  power, and social media colors
Spiders, dogs, assassins, beards and the demons  of sleep paralysis (things you want to know........ Read more »

  • November 10, 2016
  • 11:55 AM
  • 421 views

Simple Jury Persuasion: When does your client need to go  beyond apology?

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Gender stereotypes are powerful things and when your client has broken gender stereotypes and broken trust with others, they need to go beyond mere apology. First, a bit about what gender stereotypes are: Women are expected to be benevolent and concerned about others while men are expected to be confident, competitive and independent. Go against […]

Related posts:
Simple Jury Persuasion: When your Muslim female client wears a head-covering
Simple Jury Persuasion: “I transgressed. Pleas........ Read more »

Frawley, S., & Harrison, J. (2016) A social role perspective on trust repair. Journal of Management Development, 35(8), 1045-1055. DOI: 10.1108/JMD-10-2015-0149  

  • October 28, 2016
  • 07:02 AM
  • 442 views

Choosing your jurors: On bias, curiosity and  wisdom

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Earlier this week, we wrote on the question of whether those who have a higher score on the Need for Cognition Scale are just lazy (and the answer was no, not really). If you read this blog regularly, you know that bias is where we work and focus. We also like a curious juror (sometimes) […]

Related posts:
Uncommon Wisdom: Lessons from Patent and IP  Mock Jurors
Choosing to either disgust your jurors or tick them off
Choosing science over beliefs: Frequency of dog bites and feelings of........ Read more »

Kahn, Landrum, Carpenter, Helft, & Jameson. (2016) Science curiosity and political information processing. . Advances in Political Psychology. info:/

  • October 26, 2016
  • 07:02 AM
  • 454 views

Are spouse killers “wicked” or  “stressed”?

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

While it may be 2016, there are still some judges who view women and men differently even when they commit the same offense. When it comes to killing your spouse—apparently, the difference lies in the gender of the defendant. Australian researchers looked at the sentencing remarks from nine different judges from trials involving men killing […]

Related posts:
Does race make a difference in how jurors perceive  battered spouse syndrome cases?
Female serial killers: Who they are and how........ Read more »

  • October 24, 2016
  • 07:02 AM
  • 387 views

Empathy, need for cognition, getting it right and hair  transplants

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

It is yet another installment of things you want to know for voir dire, your personal appearance and choices, and how our country rates on caring for others. Sit back, educate yourself, and return to the fray with tidbits that will heighten your reputation among your co-workers for useful and inspirational pieces of information. “Need […]

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Empathy: Paving the road to preferential treatment with good intentions
Men: Exude confidence, masculinity, authority, and power!
........ Read more »

  • October 19, 2016
  • 07:02 AM
  • 341 views

Divided [North] America: We are (still) divided on climate change 

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Our scientists are not divided but we the people are very divided on the issue of climate change. You would think that when 97% of scientists agree the global weather patterns (aka “climate change”) are changing (aka “warming”) that Americans would give up and just say “okay, yeah, it’s happening”. But if you think that, […]

Related posts:
Divided [North] America: What divides America? Survey says: Values and Politics 
What do (13,000) Americans really think about  climat........ Read more »

Dunlap, R., McCright, A., & Yarosh, J. (2016) The Political Divide on Climate Change: Partisan Polarization Widens in the U.S. Environment: Science and Policy for Sustainable Development, 58(5), 4-23. DOI: 10.1080/00139157.2016.1208995  

  • September 27, 2016
  • 08:32 AM
  • 497 views

Do you really see plants? Humans and their plant blindness

by Alice Breda in la-Plumeria

What do you see in the picture? An elephant, right?
Some will say that they see an African elephant, or perhaps an elephant in the savannah protecting from the sun in the shade of a tree. But who sees an elephant and a majestic flowering baobab surrounded by savannah shrubs in a dry grass meadow?
If your answer is the latter, congratulations, you are a quite unique case. If in the picture you just see “an elephant” then you are just like most of the people around you.

This pheno........ Read more »

Wandersee, J., & Schussler, E. (1999) Preventing Plant Blindness. The American Biology Teacher, 61(2), 82-86. DOI: 10.2307/4450624  

  • September 26, 2016
  • 07:04 PM
  • 528 views

What is behavior? Baby don’t ask me, don’t ask me, no more

by Piter Boll in Earthling Nature

by Piter Kehoma Boll One of the most difficult concepts to explain in biology is certainly life itself. But I am not here today to talk about the definition of life, but rather of another puzzling concept: behavior. Behavior is the … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • September 21, 2016
  • 07:02 AM
  • 549 views

Interracial marriage is more accepted in 2016, except for those who find it “icky”

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

We’ve written about American attitudes toward interracial marriage a fair amount here and (at least once) questioned poll results suggesting dramatic improvement in attitudes toward  interracial marriage among Americans (an 87% approval rating?!). While interracial relationships may be more acceptable to many more Americans, there is also the recent report of an attack on an […]

Related posts:

So we cannot talk about race but we overwhelmingly approve interracial marriage?

S........ Read more »

  • September 19, 2016
  • 07:02 AM
  • 467 views

This and that: Heat, attraction, smoking pot,  smartphones, tattoos and stature

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

It’s time again for a combination post of things that didn’t make the cut for a full post but that we thought interesting (or odd) enough to want to share with you. We hope you enjoy this latest collection of factoids that will make you memorable when (and if) you re-share them. Hot, hot, hot: […]

Related posts:
Tattoos as a restorative act (for college-aged women anyway) 
Can you assess juror morality by counting tattoos?
“Glasses can’t hide neck tattoos”


... Read more »

Noelke, C., McGovern, M., Corsi, D., Jimenez, M., Stern, A., Wing, I., & Berkman, L. (2016) Increasing ambient temperature reduces emotional well-being. Environmental Research, 124-129. DOI: 10.1016/j.envres.2016.06.045  

  • September 13, 2016
  • 07:02 AM
  • 601 views

Impaneling a jury? Remember this (and that) during voir dire! 

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Here’s a round-up of articles that could be “all about voir dire” or simply interesting things to ponder as you go about your daily tasks. You may not think of Lemony Snicket as an expert on voir dire but he may have a point with the quote illustrating this post when it comes to voir […]

Related posts:
Should political orientation matter in voir dire?
Voir Dire Fundamentals: Look for trouble, not for friends
Voir Dire Strategy: Who’s the authoritarian?


... Read more »

  • August 26, 2016
  • 07:02 AM
  • 574 views

Juvenile offenders, divorce likelihood, assessing conscious awareness  and myth-busting in 2016

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Here’s another collection of tidbits that did not stimulate full posts but that we found interesting enough to share with you so that you can investigate them more for yourself if you so desire. While this post contains more serious information than we usually share in these sorts of posts, it is useful information to […]

Related posts:
Myth-busting: ”Today’s adults have a shorter attention span than a goldfish” 
So is that juvenile offender a “wayward youth” or a “superpr........ Read more »

  • August 24, 2016
  • 07:02 AM
  • 581 views

Psychopathy Personality Inventory—Revised (PPI-R) Scale 

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

We wrote about this scale in our last post when researchers (trying to convince the reader there is such a thing as a good psychopath for you to hire) used it in a study of German adults. The PPI-R is apparently a measure of psychopathy that is able to “detect relatively mild levels of psychopathy […]

Related posts:
The Trust in Science and Scientists Inventory Scale 
Measuring beliefs in the paranormal: The Australian Sheep Goat Scale
The Dirty Dozen Scale 


... Read more »

Lilienfeld, S. O., & Widows, M. R. (2005) Psychological Assessment Inventory–Revised (PPI-R). Lutz, FL: Psychological Assessment Resources. info:/

  • August 22, 2016
  • 07:02 AM
  • 533 views

Listen up, HR folks! There are ‘good’ psychopaths for you to hire!

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

How to hire the "good psychopath"? ... Read more »

  • August 19, 2016
  • 07:02 AM
  • 693 views

Psychopaths brains work differently—at least when  they are criminal psychopaths

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

This will shock you, or maybe relieve you: Psychopaths are different from the rest of us. Here’s another article saying there are measurable differences in how the brains of how criminal psychopaths work (and look) when compared to non-criminal psychopaths (those who have psychopathic traits but have not been convicted of criminal offenses) and non-psychopaths. […]

Related posts:
Is this a new treatment for adult criminal psychopaths? 
I want to believe some psychopaths have feelings........ Read more »

  • August 17, 2016
  • 07:02 AM
  • 626 views

Slow motion videos and juror perception of time for  intentional acts

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

New research tells us you may not want to have slow motion videos played at trial if you are the defense attorney. However, if you are the prosecutor—push hard for that video! It’s really a simple lesson: when jurors see slowed down footage of an event, they are more likely to think the person on […]

Related posts:
Do you want to make your juror “think fast”?
“Aggression genes”, Asperger’s and Absolution (for criminal acts)
Trustworthiness, real adulthood, cat videos and h........ Read more »

Caruso, E., Burns, Z., & Converse, B. (2016) Slow motion increases perceived intent. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 201603865. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1603865113  

  • August 4, 2016
  • 07:02 AM
  • 721 views

Attribute amnesia, uninterrupted eye contact, fMRI bugs, and women  driven out of STEM careers

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Here are a few articles that did not act as a catalyst to stimulate an entire post but that tweaked our fancy enough that we wanted to share them with you. Think of them as “rescue items” if you have social anxiety and want to seem scintillating….or something like that. So have you seen this […]

Related posts:
Ten minutes of uninterrupted eye contact causes hallucinations and other important things 
Women as Expert Witnesses: The good, the sad, and the ugly
Science knowledge, ob........ Read more »

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